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I've been spending again! My '43 GPW


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You do need to be careful. They say the over 70s are most vulnerable. My March 42 GPW has underlying health issues so she probably won’t be coming out this year.

I had a bad feeling yesterday. BBC local news the night before said covid rates in our neighbouring towns of Gateshead and Sunderland, are two and three times the national average now. Both towns bord

I didn't want to be part of the understandably large crowds at the various memorials around the North East today. I felt that so many people would be a distraction to reflecting quietly on the signifi

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The inside of the screen in olive drab. Parts like these take up quite a bit of space in the workshop, and once drying, it leaves little space to do anything else.

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The hood after its olive coat, while the grill waits its turn.

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The windscreen seal was then screwed in place, ready for another trial fit of the screen to check the seal position and the clamps that hold the screen to the dash.

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After the hood was dry, the screen clamps were fitted, and then the hood was trial fitted on the tub.

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These little studs on the screen are expensive for what they are, so if you're repairing a screen, try and save them. The originals were badly bent, snapped or corroded, and took heat from the gas torch to release them from the frame.

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The grill gets its olive drab.

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The base of the seat was also detached from the frame at the front. I couldn't get between the skin and frame to clean them for spot welding, I decided to braze it back in place.

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After clamping, holes were drilled through the skin, to allow brazing through to the frame.

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Markings! My other Jeep and Dodge are both in 100th Bombardment Group markings, and this Jeep will be no different. The first stencil for the 100th Bomb Group Photo Lab jeep.

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The windscreen fitted showing the completed stencil.

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The last parts of the fuel pipe were formed to run from the engine to the firewall fuel filter. This section runs from the fuel pump, across the front of the engine block to behind the alternator where it joins the flexipipe.

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Both fenders took quite a bit of adjustment, on and off the Jeep, in order for the existing holes to line up, and new ones to be drilled in the new sections that were welded in. The hood then needed further adjusting ( kinking the hat channel slightly ) in order that it fit around the instrument cowl neatly, and to keep the gaps along the fenders even. The hood needed a couple of thin washers under one side of the hinge in order to bring its centre over the centre of the grill. All it would take is for the hinge hat channel to be spot welded a fraction out of place to throw the alignment off.

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The driver and rear seats drying. Fortunately the warm sunny weather has helped the paint to harden quickly.

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Fitting the drivers seat didn't go smoothly, as the tank strap bracket and bolt interfered with the seat frame. It is seen below after extending the strap to bring it outside the frame. It only needed to be about 3/4 of an inch longer to clear the frame. Finally after much messing around, the seat was in.

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The rear seat frame needed some small brackets making to hold the pivot into the Jeep body. My other Jeep is missing these brackets, and while the seat opens and closes ok, they stop the seat pivot tube from lifting out of the tub. Here's all three seats installed.

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The black out light and hood clamps are fitted in this shot, and the Jeep is looking pretty complete. The hood bows are also fitted, though needed a little bending to slide more smoothly, as I don't think the sides of the bows were parallel.

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With the fenders and grill fitted, the head light brackets could be trial fitted and adjusted to fit correctly. They needed a little brazing to repair some cracks.

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Fitting the fenders also allowed the front wiring harnesses to be fitted.

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The inner screen frame fitted. The rubber seals were lubricated with Vaseline to help them to slide into the frame, and the frame itself was lubricated along its hinge to help it to slide into the outer frame. Don't apply too much, otherwise you end up not being able to grip the seal and pull it into place! The canvas roof from my other Jeep was also trial fitted to check the screen rake and roof bows.

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It was with some trepidation that I connected a battery to the Jeep. Just a dab of the battery terminal first, to check for a big spark and a short, but when that went ok, it was held on, and the amp meter didn't show any signs of distress! The electrics come to life as the marker lights are switched on for the first time. Just a few earth issues which needed sorting to get them both to light up. Head lights and tail lights came next.

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The last big metal working job on the Jeep was the rear bumperettes, which at some point in their life, have been cut down. After most of the paint was stripped away, I found that both bumperettes had the Ford 'f' stamp on them.

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The missing parts were marked out on sheet steel, and cut out with the grinding disc. The new parts were then clamped and welded at the centre. Because the parts are curved, the clamps were progressively moved out and the weld extended outwards.

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I searched the 100th BG website and archives for ages, and only found two black and white pictures of this particular Jeep. Those two pictures are both front views, as seen below. Wartime pictures used with permission of the 100th Bomb Group Foundation - www.100thbg.com

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Two days after painting the Jeep rear bumperettes, the 100th Bomb Group Foundation news letter arrived from the USA. On the front cover, A4 size is a nice wartime colour picture of two Airmen with a hose, washing something, with a Jeep trailer and airfield construction equipment in the back ground. The rest of the picture is printed on the back cover, and what are the two Airmen washing? A Jeep. But not any old Jeep, the exact Jeep I'm copying!

This picture is a rear view of the jeep, and shows how the bumperettes are actually marked up, as opposed to the way I did it, the more often seen large white area! So out came the wet and dry, the bumperettes were rubbed down and resprayed olive drab.

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Looking more closely at the star on the rear of the body, the outline of a Ford script logo can be seen. While my Jeep isn't a script Jeep, I am at least copying a Ford Jeep with a Ford!

Once the olive was dry, the white outer edge was painted, followed by re-stencilling the Bomb Group and Squadron markings.

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I also made two hardboard templates for the windscreen glazing. These were dropped off at Pilkington's, and should be cut and back in a couple of days.

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