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Hi Jerry, in short yes. They could also be used as ballast tractors by creating a box on the back. We have some of the original concrete weights tucked away too. Never be afraid to ask; I am always posting odd questions :cheesy:

 

James - Thanks for that. For my sins I'm helping a fairly comprehensive excercise rebuilding a Queen Mary (5 ton) at Debach (Suffolk) airfield. I'd always associated the Crossley with the 'Garden shed' coachwork, your vehicle's coachwork makes a handsome lorry. Jerry

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James - Thanks for that. For my sins I'm helping a fairly comprehensive excercise rebuilding a Queen Mary (5 ton) at Debach (Suffolk) airfield. I'd always associated the Crossley with the 'Garden shed' coachwork, your vehicle's coachwork makes a handsome lorry. Jerry

 

 

We have one of those projects too. We need to talk more! :D

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That's a handsome beast, are you going to restore any of them?[/QUOT

 

All i n good time. The one in the photograph is totally original and we don't really know how to proceed. It run and drives well but all the marking are visible and we don't quite know what to do. One is turned into a timber tractor, one is a rolling chassis and the final one is complete but the cab is totally rotten.

 

I rather like this one how it is now, as a survivor without interference, maybe it just some kind of clean up?

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I rather like this one how it is now, as a survivor without interference, maybe it just some kind of clean up?

 

 

Yes we have struggled with the same question. It is how you sympathetically restore something without destroying its originality. Sadly someone had a go at painting the front but the back is untouched. The old girl just sits in the shed as we don't know which way to jump.

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Humm not to my knowledge. We have had two of them for fifty year and the other over ten :cheesy:

 

Hi James, have managed to look back through the magazines and it was a gentleman by the name of Robin Davies who purchased three of these from a Peter Naylor in Helpston, Lincolnshire for Corralls before transporting them back to Portsmouth. So that clears up that one!

 

It was mentioned in Classic and Vintage Commercials and had some good pictures of the Crossley's if anyone had missed it.

 

Scott

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Hi James, have managed to look back through the magazines and it was a gentleman by the name of Robin Davies who purchased three of these from a Peter Naylor in Helpston, Lincolnshire for Corralls before transporting them back to Portsmouth. So that clears up that one!

 

It was mentioned in Classic and Vintage Commercials and had some good pictures of the Crossley's if anyone had missed it.

 

Scott

 

Thanks Scott, I have to admit I have never heard of either of these gentlemen. Is Robin restoring them?

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Thanks Scott, I have to admit I have never heard of either of these gentlemen. Is Robin restoring them?

 

I think they were brought more for the company (Corralls) from what I could make out. However they were brought out and the gentleman who had written in didn't know if they had survived. The editor responded though saying that one of the vehicles in question, CFL 994, was still listed by the DVLA as surviving.

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If anybody has an address I am near to Portsmouth and could investigate further.

 

Sorry, having read the article again it turns out that although the Crossley's were indeed sold they never actually went to Portsmouth as the new owners didn't think they would be viable projects. So they stayed in Peter Naylor's Lincolnshire farm at Helpston as far as I can work out. As I said earlier the DVLA apparently still lists the Crossley, CFL 994, as having current road tax.

 

Scott

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  • 7 months later...

I cant believe it's 8 months since I did anything with the Crossley!

Well I am now the proud owner of half of a Carb for the Crossley, if anybody has the butterfly throttle part that bolts on the bottom for a Solex 46RVI please let me know! :laugh:

$(KGrHqZ,!lIFJFzhYn3hBS(ld072e!~~60_12.jpg

The carb is made of Bronze which is why there aren't many left, so I may have to adapt something.

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I have a few Zenith 48VIR carbs used on 1960s Bedford trucks, complete with the extra bit you are after. I will try and find out if they will fit your carb.

The Zenith ones I have look quite similar too yours.

Edited by Shroomer
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I'm not sure if the zenith carb will work, but I've got one of the resto boys looking in the archives for any info on your carb. Hopefully they might turn up some useful drawings/parts lists? May take a few days.

 

I work for SU carbs ( also Zenith, Solex,Amal ) by the way.

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I'm not sure if the zenith carb will work, but I've got one of the resto boys looking in the archives for any info on your carb. Hopefully they might turn up some useful drawings/parts lists? May take a few days.

 

I work for SU carbs ( also Zenith, Solex,Amal ) by the way.

 

 

Hi Andy,

I have a 1950 data book from Solex and for the Crossley 4x4 with 30/100 engine. The carb is a 46RZI, choke is 38, main jet is 205, correction jet 210, pilot jet 75, GA jet is 7, GS jet 175, well is 7mm, Ass. is 20, E tube or Jet cap. is 51569/L2, MPH 41, RPM 2,500, Specification Record No. S.964

There is a slight variant on this one for the Crossley 4x4 RAF fire tender.

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The Solex arrived in the post today, and what do you know it's complete and in good condition!

After referring to some rather grainy photos in my photocopy manual it looks like it mounts straight to the four bolt manifold but only using two of the available holes, not quite sure why Crossley did this but hey ho!

It is a governor carb which the manual explains how to adjust but what does this do and why?

I will strip and clean it and post some pictures later.

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  • 1 year later...

Hello "PB Harcourt" I have just joined this forum and this is my first post apart from talking to an administrator, I am interested in all things Crossley, I have restored a Crossley coach and am mid way through a second one . I also have a 1929 6 cylinder Crossley bus I took over in a dismantled state and also a complete but as yet unrestored Crossley 4x4 Tractor unit. I noticed you havent posted any news in the last year so i am interested to learn of any progress and what your current list of things needed and wanted for the restoration might be. my name is Daveby the way! Look forward to hearing from you.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hello "PB Harcourt" I have just joined this forum and this is my first post apart from talking to an administrator, I am interested in all things Crossley, I have restored a Crossley coach and am mid way through a second one . I also have a 1929 6 cylinder Crossley bus I took over in a dismantled state and also a complete but as yet unrestored Crossley 4x4 Tractor unit. I noticed you havent posted any news in the last year so i am interested to learn of any progress and what your current list of things needed and wanted for the restoration might be. my name is Daveby the way! Look forward to hearing from you.

 

Hello Dave

 

I was interested to hear abouit bthe Crossley tractor unit. Is it a wartime one? Do you have any photos please?

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Hello Pino,

Yes the Crossley tractor unit is a wartime one, the toughened wside window glasses are stamped May 1945 and so are the tyres so that makes it one of the last ones through the production line. The chassis number is 73044. It stayed with the RAF until 1956 and was then bought by a contractor who worked on trenchless cable laying. For this work it was fitted with a winch and a land amchor and was fitted with a pto drive from a Crossley fire crash tender to operate the equipment required to make it practical in this role. The trailer coupling was also removed during this conversion work. It worked in this role for nearly twenty years until the 1974 petrol crisis saw it retired off.

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