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Land rover gs rover 8


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Been helping a mate sort some sheds at his farthers place found a rover 8 GS in a dismantled state, can any one give me an idear of its value, hoping that i can get hold of the moter chassey seems sound bulk head will need work but seen worse ,Its service number is 74 EN 08 think this is about 1964/65 .will get pics next week.

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Value is subjective.

 

It is always what someone is willing to pay. A similar vehicle on ebay uk this week failed to get any bids at 500 pounds opening price.

 

R

 

Everybody would prefer a rover8 FFR and they vary in price hugely. depending upon 24v originality and running components in-situ. Even rarer is a Rover 9 FFR 40 amp!

 

A Rover 8FFR has been advertised on here recently for a give away price of £500.

 

That would make a GS worth a lot less in my opinion. I believe they are more common also that restricts value.

 

It is really only worth a donor spares vehicle as a GS.

 

Agree with Robin though and value is very subjective depending upon who wants it and why.

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and how far they have to travel to see it & get it back home.

 

Would not be a UK buyer then................:undecided:

 

Sorry talking drivle as I though it was with Robin oversees...........That will teach me to have a glass of wine after an 18 mile bike ride.......Goes straight to the head!

Edited by Rover8FFR
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Its located about 5 miles from me so no transport costs involved ,the bulkhead will need some work on the botom of the door pilers and were the ruber seal fits under the screen but foot wells sound,will be going down during the week to do a better inspection, but on first inspection the chassey looks to need no welding .Thanks for the gide on prices will see if i can get it at a sensible price.

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  • 2 months later...

after a bit of digging I find that a Landrover 8 is in fact a Series 2A.... is that agreed?.......

.......I can only go general prices around my area and it doesn't make any differance whether ex military or civilian around here to be honest..........the bottom line is .........a SWB Series 2A in bits and needing work on the bulkhead isn't worth anymore than about £250 quid tops.....

.....and I wouldn't pay that..

the last ex-military SWB2A I bought (18 months ago) had an excellent chassis and the bulkhead was good too......not running but was more or less complete but in a mess and a long, long way from being back on the road.......

...... I gave £100 quid for her....

like someone said.........its all relative to who wants her but around here a rough old Landrover ain't worth a lot at all........

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Talking military 88" (excluding Lightweights).

 

Rover 6 = S2

 

Rover 8 = S2A

 

Rover 10 (early) = S2A is more or less like a Rover 8 , except individual wiper motors go and are replaced with a single wiper motor (best clue for non-rivet counter). It retains the inverted "T" grille mesh and deep sills.

 

Rover 10 (late) = S2A a very rare vehicle, this has the Maltese Cross grille mesh and shallow sills . Let me know with photographs when you find one..

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<SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: comic sans ms">after a bit of digging I find that a Landrover 8 is in fact a Series 2A.... is that agreed?.......<BR>.......I can only go general prices around my area and it doesn't make any differance whether ex military or civilian around here to be honest..........the bottom line is .........a SWB Series 2A in bits and needing work on the bulkhead isn't worth anymore than about £250 quid tops.....<BR>.....and I wouldn't pay that..<BR>the last ex-military SWB2A I bought (18 months ago) had an excellent chassis and the bulkhead was good too......not running but was more or less complete but in a mess and a long, long way from being back on the road.......<BR>...... I gave £100 quid for her....<BR>like someone said.........its all relative to who wants her but around here a rough old Landrover ain't worth a lot at all........</SPAN>

 

Noted Bob but I would dispute the above values with the very best of respect Mon Ami, especially regarding a functioning& complete 40amp Selenium rectified Rover 8 24v.

 

A pukka running 40amp Rover 8 is becoming a very rare old beast indeed. Parts are becoming even rarer for the old Toastie Grilled Rover.

 

I know of a couple of 24v Rover 8's recently in varying condition, but both needing different levels of work going for between £500 and £1000. They were both bought up very quickly. Lots of them have been converted to 12v and still waer the toast rack grille, but are not complete and genuine.

 

I have owned my EK for six years and EL (Yes one of the Rover 8s referred to above) for only a few months and have noticed how few of these old toasties crop up that are complete and un-butchered regarding the electrics.

 

In the last 6 years I have only ever seen 40amp electric items up for sale once or twice. (Generator, Rectifier and Control Box). 90 amp kit is ten a penny due to volumes of S3s produced and still out there.

 

I agree with your comments for a 12v GS as basically that is a tweaked civi landrover, so would command similar values, unless it has an interesting history back from Deepcut.

 

Any other Land Rover gurus agree with my perception / opinion or is it just that.....My Opinion??????

 

Ruxy / Clive what do you think?

Edited by Rover8FFR
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There is no bench-marking of prices , people with vision will pay a premium according to the possibilities. There is a steady demand for the Rover "Marks" , the better examples will always make good money. Often the person who sells understands what he is disposing of, likewise more so the buyer understands all (probably more than the seller) and will often pay more for a unrestored example than one which has been "restored". Valuations on vehicles deteriorated / specialist bits missing can still make good money if they are marketed in the right way. If a person has no interest & just wants shot quick without breaking for eBay then they could be sold for scrap price , but there never seems many bargains turning up.. eBay has made it a National / International market.

 

In my case - I drifted towards newer S3 in particualr Lightweights when they were being disposed of, now I am retired with more time - I consider the S2A military marks a better project BUT as yet with too many projects uncompleted.. So the younger ones with a interest will still have a fight to obtain the limited supply.

 

Regarding "Toast-Racks" , somebody had 2 qty. new on eBay about 2 years ago, BIN £30 + P&P , I decided not to risk & did the BIN deal (on account of if I had to fabricate and have galv.) - the other only had one bid & made £15 + P&P..

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There is no bench-marking of prices , people with vision will pay a premium according to the possibilities. There is a steady demand for the Rover "Marks" , the better examples will always make good money. Often the person who sells understands what he is disposing of, likewise more so the buyer understands all (probably more than the seller) and will often pay more for a unrestored example than one which has been "restored". Valuations on vehicles deteriorated / specialist bits missing can still make good money if they are marketed in the right way. If a person has no interest & just wants shot quick without breaking for eBay then they could be sold for scrap price , but there never seems many bargains turning up.. eBay has made it a National / International market.

 

In my case - I drifted towards newer S3 in particualr Lightweights when they were being disposed of, now I am retired with more time - I consider the S2A military marks a better project BUT as yet with too many projects uncompleted.. So the younger ones with a interest will still have a fight to obtain the limited supply.

 

Regarding "Toast-Racks" , somebody had 2 qty. new on eBay about 2 years ago, BIN £30 + P&P , I decided not to risk & did the BIN deal (on account of if I had to fabricate and have galv.) - the other only had one bid & made £15 + P&P..

 

Thanks FT.

 

The toast rack grill is the easy part and could be easily fabricated I guess......All the working early 40amp gubbins behind that grill was my case in point...Rectifier, 40amp Gen, Control box etc..All the heart and soul of a pukka working Rover8 24v. In essence the 'Toast Rack' Land Rover.

 

All too many old Rover8 24v have had those items removed and replaced due to rarity and expense of replacement. Even a 90amp Gen modified to a 40amp vehicle would be more appropriate, but again not genuine. It is that genuine and exclusivity of complete vehicles / spare parts that in my book makes then a little more specialised and therefore command higher values.

 

I agree with what you say about the specialist versions of a S2a etc

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The purist in me says GS are possibly the hardest to find. Collectors ignore them too easily so they are the ones that fall unloved and get broken. Considering how few GS vehicles are known to exist, compared to the FFR variant, then it amazes me that collectors still say GS are worth less and should be used as spares for the more common FFRs. GS variants have a place on the show ground. They are military vehicles, and were designed (in the case of the 2a) to be capable of having FFR kit fitted if required.

 

Prices vary greatly. I miss some gems do to not knowing they were there or having funds. I payed over the odds for my FFR wreck, but did so because it was so complete and un-molested.

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.

 

Rover 10 (late) = S2A a very rare vehicle, this has the Maltese Cross grille mesh and shallow sills . Let me know with photographs when you find one..

Is this the type you mean? This is my current project. Civvy I know, but shows the shallow sills of the later series 3 (plus headlamps in the wings, but retains the wire grille (fat cross type) I can't remember the last time I saw a military GS with this set-up. Like you say-rare beasts indeed.

scam1 046.jpg

scam1 044.jpg

Edited by daz76
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Yes , that is a Maltese Cross grille mesh , head-lamps moved to wings, the 109" is the Rover 11 and there is just a few around (again early & late) . I think all the Rover 10 (late) went to the RAF , I don't know if any exist. Over the years the mil. types often lost their rear bumperettes as a civilian type tow-member replacements were used.

 

There were few contracts placed for the Rover 10 because the Lightweight 12 volt took over the role. Generally speaking Rover 10 is 12 volt because there were so few made in 24 volt and again for the RAF.

 

Over the years of production of Rover 10 & 11 there were many , many contracts , probably in small numbers for many specialist roles.

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Your project , you could in fact do a Walt project because there were 88" and 109" "Car Utility" (Station Wagens) and this is where it all gets a bit complex. Rover 10 & 11 use a military chassis , there were RHD & LHD chassis (handed by only one steering relay hole) BUT also there were RHD / LHD "Unisex" chassis , there were used on the "Car Utility" - in fact a standard civilian chassis like yours , such station wagens did not have rear mil. bumperettes. Perusal of parts lists are quite interesting - plenty of authentic possibilities for your truck , AFAIK nomenclature plate for period but obviously branded as contract CAR UTILITY - so keep your eyes open for one with a plate , I would be interested to see a phgotograph.

Edited by ruxy
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Thanks for the info Ruxy. I haven't heard the grille referred to as the Maltese Cross before.Learnt something new! All the things you say about the 'civilianised' 109 SW's has got me thinking about how to restore it. Maybe a nod in the military direction would be good. Unfortunately the children have already christened it as our 'big red land rover'. Might pose a problem! I'll look out for the true military version a bit more carefully now. Cheers. Daz

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The purist in me says GS are possibly the hardest to find. Collectors ignore them too easily so they are the ones that fall unloved and get broken. Considering how few GS vehicles are known to exist, compared to the FFR variant, then it amazes me that collectors still say GS are worth less and should be used as spares for the more common FFRs. GS variants have a place on the show ground. They are military vehicles, and were designed (in the case of the 2a) to be capable of having FFR kit fitted if required.

 

Prices vary greatly. I miss some gems do to not knowing they were there or having funds. I payed over the odds for my FFR wreck, but did so because it was so complete and un-molested.

 

Very fair comment ferret1958uk. I guess the Rover8FFR owner in me is slightly biased. I must confess looking at all the registers that circulate on the web these days, that I was very much under the impression that the rover 8 & 9 24v vehicles were much rarer in numbers than a 12v GS. Certainly a Rover9 24v..........:shocked:

 

They say that the S2/2a landrover is the sweetest of them all and with that different grille they just stand out (to me) as a real sweatie. That grille certainly prompts lots of questions when out and about.......The grille however did make 'bush' BBQs less straight forward as it sat behind the square section protection.

 

I guess this thread has identified that we all have our affections for military vehicles in all sort of fractions and beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Added to that if somebody wants or needs something desperately enough then the average price pales into insignificance.

 

I know over the years I have had some real bargains and sometimes paid a premium for 40 amp spares. But I am just glad that I aquired the majority some time ago as they are a lot less common now. Whereas the 90 amp set ups are ten a penny by comparison due to volume of production in late S2a / S3 and the Lightweights / 101s etc.....

 

Also starter motors, dizzies, coils, filters and plugs are interchangeable so I guess its just that 40amp Gen set, rectifier and control box that are the unique and very rare electrics.

 

;)

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Ironic that kicking about thru the late 70s and 80s there seemed to be loads of 24V FFR Landrovers on offer in this area (seemed to be more lightweights than anything else as I recall? ) and they could be aquired a lot cheaper than a standard 12V..most folk would junk all the electrics and convert them to 12V.....always the way though I guess!..

.thru the 60s and into the early 70s a local fella to me had 2 Jeeps with a very rudimentary cab made out of wood and steel sheet and with very rudimentary cranes in the back of them....they had wide dumper type tyres on and he used them for timber tushing in the tighter/ more awkward areas of forest down here (he also had a couple of Matadors for the timber on 'easier' ground)......by the time I was 12 or so the Jeeps were lying dead behind his house and he had moved onto using a Landrover for the same job........don't worry though...they were 'saved' by another chap who thankfully was way more switched on than most folk at that time.....oh what I wouldn't give for 'advance hindsight' !

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Bob

 

I agree.........Hindsight......I wish I had the rights to that, bottle it and sell it to the world.....

 

Could of retired a loooong time ago. Also bought a massive barn to house a massive MV collection.

 

Didnt most people convert to 12v when they had failures with the 24v systems and back then it was cheaper to convert than preserve / repair.......How times have changed!

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Bob

 

I agree.........Hindsight......I wish I had the rights to that, bottle it and sell it to the world.....

 

Could of retired a loooong time ago. Also bought a massive barn to house a massive MV collection.

 

Didnt most people convert to 12v when they had failures with the 24v systems and back then it was cheaper to convert than preserve / repair.......How times have changed!

yeah as I recall a 24v spark plug was summat daft like 8 quid a piece and a normal one then was about 80p.....summat like that anyways:)...

....most fellas about here that fiddled with Landrovers had a pile of 24v bits lying under their bench/chucked in the far corner of the workshop etc......

...Typical question circa 1985 ish:

"Hey is that starter motor under your bench any good Dave? I could use that !"..

Typical answer:

"Nah! its 24 flipping volt ain't it....I took it off that ex-army one I bought last year!"

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