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MV Part longest usage


robin craig
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I was looking at a new (to me) book the other day, when I spied the horn on a Daimler Dingo.

 

If I am correct, that horn has not changed and was used in many vehicles over the years and is still in service in Stormers to this day.

 

Does that make it the longest usage of any Brit MV part?

 

Too qualify for this distinction, the part can not be a nut bolt or washer but a whole component ie a bracket or a light or an engine component that has been in service continuously from original fitment to a particular vehicle and then been used on others that are STILL in service today.

 

 

 

R

Edited by robin craig
clarification of part definition
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The screw lens FV light fittings do not go back as far as the early 50s from what I've seen. For example early Ferrets, Austin Champ etc didn't use them at that time. The FV headlamp is used on the Champ, so that is a possible contender.

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somehow i would like to say it is within bounds, but then we could say the same perhaps for a 24 volt headlight bulb as the bulb is a part of a complete headlight as the U joint is part of a complete shaft assembly.

 

So if you follow that far it kinda means its out of bounds as it is a sub component not a whole "part" as was the intent of the usage of the word "part"

 

Get my drift?

 

Sorry to spoil your endeavours

 

R

 

No problem Robin!

 

What you're after as I understand it is something that will bolt onto the vehicle as a complete discrete unit, whether that unit is one piece like, say, a guard or a bracket, or an assembly in itself like a light or horn, is that right?

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The Lucas horn changes several times over the years and though similar, the post-war style as shown in the link is not the same as the wartime pattern. The afv interior light is also not the same wartime and post-war. They are developments of the same but surely that does not count?

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Ruxy,

 

I highly doubt the Warner socket comes close, last production vehicles they were used on would be series 2A Land Rovers, me thinks.

 

R

 

Yes - correct. Only this week did I receive one off Matt Rimmer for my Rover 10 (last of line military S2A). However they were on the WW2 Jeeps etc. - I was wondering how long they continued on US vehicles (they seem current in Warner catalogue) - and they did I believe continue longer than early 1970's on British FV's.

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The horn as per the advert photo is the same as on a 1953 Series 1 Land Rover, Ex NZ Army.

That it is a 12 volt unit.

The same basic design is also on the front of my son's Leyland Cub of 1930.

That has a chrome surround to the outer edge, and chrome domed nuts holding it together, otherwise it the shape appears to be the same. A different mounting to the latter models, but only a variation to the pattern. There are no numbers stamped on the base but has Lucas New Alto stamped to the chrome surround.

Could this take the use of this horn pattern continuous back to 1930.

Leyland Cub's were used by the Army here in NZ.?

Doug

Leyland Cub army,  alt eml 061.jpg

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Alastair,

 

the basic question I would ask you is "is it currently still in British Military Vehicle usage in service".

 

R

 

Not sure if these are eliminated under the cotter pin rule, but certainly long in service, and I would think they are still being used somewhere, if only on a piece of plant holding a lid shut .

 

This one is not fully inserted, so it looks different as the ring is not over the pin.

 

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a2-11.jpg

DSCF0829.jpg

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Nice try Mr Gritineye, but sadly as per the "cotter pin" ruling its out of bounds.

 

The variations in the horn trouble me but when observed it does "look" the same and I'm saying that puts it in the running, we will await consensus on allowing at the final day of judgement.

 

We should do the same with the interior light. Could I ask Adrian to post a picture of the WW2 version and Chris or I will do a picture of the more modern version so we can have a look see?

 

 

R

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Nice try Mr Gritineye, but sadly as per the "cotter pin" ruling its out of bounds.

 

The variations in the horn trouble me but when observed it does "look" the same and I'm saying that puts it in the running, we will await consensus on allowing at the final day of judgement.

 

We should do the same with the interior light. Could I ask Adrian to post a picture of the WW2 version and Chris or I will do a picture of the more modern version so we can have a look see?

 

 

R

 

I'll do some 'then and now' on both to show the differences, though I'm not sure I have a post-war lamp to take a picture of....

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Horns may look the same but placed directly side by side there maybe a difference in size. I bought a NOS stock horn of ebay went to fit it on the vehicle and found that it was smaller than the original. Works just fine but thats another story

 

The part or parts that have been in use with the British Military that visually look the same and have interchangeable parts should be the definition of length of service.

 

Off to count my beans now

 

IMG_0683.jpg

Edited by ferrettkitt
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One can't forget the the Brit MV headlight is still in use with the RM DUKWs, even if they were not an original fitment they are still serving and im sure they were modified for thos lights a whiel ago as they also use th side / turn signals that are so common to them in other usage.

 

R

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So an easy way to find the longest serving part would be to find the oldest vehicle still on military strength, which may well be very old and in a museum or historic collection.

 

On that basis, is a ship a vehicle - most parts of HMS Victory?

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I know Sean you are awash with bright ideas but try to keep your feet firmly grounded and think vehicle not ship.

 

Otherwise we will have to consider bringing back keel hauling if you dont understand the difference!

 

Now muscle in and get your thinking cap back on.

 

R

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Another contender as longest part in use. A pressure gauge. As used on Fowler B5 traction engines in the Boer war delivered in South Africa July 1900.

The pressure gauge remains the same format and operation to this day.

Doug

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Another contender as longest part in use. A pressure gauge. As used on Fowler B5 traction engines in the Boer war delivered in South Africa July 1900.

The pressure gauge remains the same format and operation to this day.

Doug

 

Doug, is there a current in service military vehicle with this fitted? What kind of vehicle would it be fitted on? Any photos?

 

Chris

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With the present price of fuel perhaps a return to steam. Anyway any vehicle requiring a pressure gauge for hydraulics, or air etc would have its ancestry with the steam gauge. Many are a different size and face to the orginal but the same internal mechanism.

As for current useage of the same size and form as 1900, that would be on plant and equipment operating pressure vessels, pumps, boilers etc.If we could include marine craft as contenters, then the pressure gauge would certaining be included.

The interesting point overall is an item with its origin in steam days is still commonly in use today ( in many situations the size of the unit has changed)

Class it as another aspect to the search.

Doug

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How about the lucas brake light pressure switch to the back of the master cylinder ? Still available now with no changes apart from stock number and fitted to my 37 PU, hydraulic brakes were around before then so it must be in with a shout.

 

tim

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