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HMS Van Dyke


Mk3iain
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On 9/6/2019 at 12:11 PM, Mk3iain said:

 

 

I have looked further into the circumstances of the sinking and official accounts say that the ship was lost after missing a rendezvous and subsequently found by the German forces and bombed. A bit convenient.

My dad and his brother were firm in their recollection that it was used as a diversion (they were there) and I have asked a retired senior naval officer if he felt the RN would avoid admitting this. "Absolutely".  I think so too.

Maybe we will find out some day if it is recorded anywhere but I wont hold my breath.

With regard to your thoughts above - if you look here https://www.naval-history.net/xDKWD-HF1940AA.htm under Sunday 9th June 1940, you'll find a transcription of the Admiralty War Diaries (Rear Admiral, Anti-Aircraft Ships) pertaining to the Vandyck.  It states that two destroyers, HMS Firedrake and HMS Delight were despatched at 03.10 to search for the Vandyke after she missed the rendezvous.  At 04.31 an air search was ordered.  A message was received from the Vandyck at 08.10 stating 'am at rendezvous X', at which point, HMS Delight is instructed to 'order Vandyck to steer 270 degrees' (the same bearing the troop ship convoy steers later that day) and subsequently to 'bring Vandyck on' and to inform the C in C Rosyth of her expected time of arrival in position.  

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/26/2019 at 12:35 AM, mikecsteer said:

Only just seen this, been busily on tour, then Christmas and then moved house, That is quite amazing, thank you for posting

 

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  • 11 months later...

I have just discovered this thread. My grandfather George Thorpe was chief steward on the HMS Vandyck.I have his account of the bombing and his subsequent internment written in pencil at the time in a very small leather journal.As well as his account it also contains addresses of several men onboard and their wives.It is very interesting as to his take on what happened in the original bombing,and includes dramatic scenes of the struggle at sea to Bleik.If it is of interest to anyone I would be happy to write most of it out verbatim.

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On 1/17/2021 at 8:03 PM, Pauline Beecroft said:

I have just discovered this thread. My grandfather George Thorpe was chief steward on the HMS Vandyck.I have his account of the bombing and his subsequent internment written in pencil at the time in a very small leather journal.As well as his account it also contains addresses of several men onboard and their wives.It is very interesting as to his take on what happened in the original bombing,and includes dramatic scenes of the struggle at sea to Bleik.If it is of interest to anyone I would be happy to write most of it out verbatim.

Hi Pauline - many thanks for posting this.  I, for one, would be incredibly grateful if you could transcribe and post your grandfather’s journal.  As you’re probably aware from this forum, I and several others have a vested interest in this subject - my father was a RN Sick Berth Attendant on the Vandyck, and I was due to visit Bleik for the eightieth anniversary last summer until the virus intervened.  I don’t know if you’re aware, but some of the Norwegian fishermen from Bleik salvaged the Vandyck’s bell, and it can still be seen today mounted on the side of the village’s church meeting house (you can even see it on Google street view).

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  • 6 months later...

This is a remarkable thread.

My father’s cousin was Thomas Denis O’Shaughnessy and served as an Able Bodied Seaman on HMS Vandyke. He was captured as a POW and remained so all the way through to 22 Mar 1945. He essentially spent his early 20s all as a prisoner.  I do not have a great deal of other information, I know he escaped 3 times, each time being recaptured. Once he escaped and with a Polish airman stole a plane, only to crash it on take off. 
 

After the war he never married and died 58 years of age. I think he had quite a sad life from what I gather. I expect this experience very much impacted him. 

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