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While I've been working away in Cambridge the Loyd Rear Axle has continued to be repaired by Pete as a very generous favour! See the photos below. The axle is the later type increased diameter unit, thus the one I found in Belgium earlier in the year was no use. The original range wreck axle has been hit a few times, one hit had pinned the LHS stub axle in place, another had sent a crack around 2 ft along the tube and another had punched a hole right through it. I cut out the damage pinning the stub axle and this has now been welded back in. I recovered a stub axle from the second Loyd wreck which was machined down and used as an internal sleeve when re-welding the axle tube. Finally the crack was ground out and welded. superficial range damage was left for posterity. Thanks again Pete, beer is on me!

 

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Edited by ajmac
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Working on the rear of the Loyd now.      

It’s on its wheels now.  Engine and gearbox in in Q1 2019.  The kids showed an interest when the Loyd had its first roll out this week.  

Update video.    

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Two more British built track return rollers added to the Loyd parts stock this weekend. I found them hanging on a steel wire looped over a corrugated steel roof on a shed, holding down the sheets!

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  • 1 month later...

Well, finally moved in and the two workshops are ideal, water tight, warm etc.. Pity I will not be able to get any Loyd work done as I have to rewire the house, get it signed off, redecorate the whole place, put up a fence & put in a Kitchen and Bathroom! All that fitted in between working away from home for the next Six weeks and then before the end of the year another 6 week stint away. With any luck I can get the chassis back to the workshop and fit the floor along with the engine guard.

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  • 5 months later...

Does anyone have any photos of original or NOS wartime british armour seat squabs? I've some wartime photos of a Loyd interior and the seats are leather covered, but what colour? I was hoping there was a standard that all british open vehicles had to follow. I have seen green leather NOS carrier seats but that may have been Canadian. Sadly I doubt there are any original Loyd seat squabs in existence. I'd love to be proved wrong.

 

ps. Finished the bedrooms and kitchen, so half the workshop is now clear, board the loft to clear the other half and the Loyd can move in....the rebuild phase will begin.

Edited by ajmac
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I have seen green leather NOS carrier seats but that may have been Canadian. Sadly I doubt there are any original Loyd seat squabs in existence. .

 

The green seat cushions that were around about 25 years ago by the dozen, had British TL part number labels on them but were not leather, but a green leathercloth, a Rexine type of material, and inside was a padding that was layers of felt IIRC, and not comfortable at all. Have seen some turn up recently nos.

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Jim Clark at allied canvas stocks the correct material to replicate "rexine" it's a very good modern equivalent and is a +99% match to colour and texture.

Rexine does have a bit of a leather look about it so it could be mistaken for leather in the photos.

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Jim Clark at allied canvas stocks the correct material to replicate "rexine" it's a very good modern equivalent and is a +99% match to colour and texture.

Rexine does have a bit of a leather look about it so it could be mistaken for leather in the photos.

True Ben, really all I can say from the photos is that looks like leather and as such could be vinyl, I didn't know synthetics like that were around in the 40s so I presumed it was leather. They are at least 100% not canvas :-)

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  • 1 month later...

It may be just a small addition, but it all counts towards the goal.

 

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A set of four NOS Bogie linings, these will be installed in the 1944 British fabricated bogie that is the type originally fitted to my Loyd. The other three are cast so if any one knows of a savable bogie frame which is fabricated rather than case please drop me a line.

 

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British Fabricated Bogie on a Loyd recovered last year (not mine, sadly)

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  • 2 months later...

Getting on with the rear axle.

Last year is was cut in two to allow the jammed track adjuster arms to be pressed out, that done it was welded back together on a jig. Thanks to Pete, who posts on here with his Bedford OY project.

one side of the axle is complete but the other had the retainer / spacer for the felt seal blown off on the range, I have ordered a water jet cut replacement which only needs three tack welds to attach, you can see the good side on one of the photos.

As you can see the axle has strengthening plates and a flat plate on top, this was added in circa 1943 when the Loyd design was improved to make it more robust, the rear axle diameter went up to 3.5" during this time.

 

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Cleaning up before painting.

 

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Looking its best in 50 years!

 

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The axle is upside down on the bench, note seal retainer attached with four short welds. Its all a pit poor in my opinion, all it really does is pay lip service to keeping water and dirt out of the track adjuster so that it will continue to rotate in the axle tube in use.

 

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On this side the outer seal retainer is missing, a replacement is to be welded on.

 

Felt is on order to make the new seals.

 

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This shows the earlier version of Loyd rear axle, note the diameter and different mounting arrangment.

 

Next job is to build up the back of the chassis and fit the rear x-tube....hey it will soon be coming together :cheesy:

Edited by ajmac
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Seal retainer has been cut, Chassis is in its new home being painted before rebuild finally begins and work has been started on the track adjusters, in fact, the stub axle was pressed out by a 15 ton press just half an hour

 

 

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Remember I asked about felt seal material so I could cut a new one....this is the original, seen better days!

 

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Rear axle track adjuster strip down and rebuild starts.

 

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Adjuster starts to come loose

 

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Gentle tapping and lots of PlusGas helped it off - I should have shares in the PlusGas company!

 

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Even the smallest part like this front brake cable anchor has a Loyd part number.

 

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Note the two different types of anchor, one from each of the range wrecks.

Edited by ajmac
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  • 2 weeks later...

First off I am going to make the photos smaller and not update as often, sadly its much easier to update Facebook....shame on me.

 

All the Loyd parts are back in one place again and it makes work so much easier.

 

Rear axle install is complete along with braces (known as track adjuster arms), gussets and clamps. The clamps are interesting as they tell a story of Loyd development. As you will know there is little hard data and no books dealing with Loyds, other than photo books and a chapter in the first 'Carriers' book by NW.

 

The first Loyds used a 3" dia rear axle and two track adjuster arms, sometime in 1942/43 gussets were added to the arms presumably due to problems in the field. In a more complete design change the Tracked Towing Loyds in 1943 received a new rear axle of 3.5" dia with additional pads welded on the top side to bolt to the track adjuster arms. As the axle dia had increased new clamps were required but in a typical Loyd move to save money and time the original clamp castings were retained and the machining altered. To maintain the required material thickness in the clamps a spacer was added between the two halves before the bore was machined. You can see the spacers in the final photo of the assembly.

 

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Front axle strip down has started and the drum took some time to remove as I didn't want to damage anything, Loyd drums are like hens teeth. Over the next few weeks the axle will be stripped and rebuilt before going on the front of the chassis along with the torque tube, drivers floor and front lower hull plate.

 

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Loyd drums are like hens teeth.

 

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Are they an amalgam of 7V brake drums and Lloyd specific parts? I'm presuming the brake drums themselves are Fordson ones bolted inside the Lloyd drum/sprocket carrier?

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You have hit on an interesting part of Loyd Carrier development there!

 

Originally the very early vehicles (MKI) used 7V drums / Bendix brakes with a plate and sprocket bolted on the front, all part of the short development schedule and business case to the government, i.e. it's all proven technology.... However research in the archive has shown that in extended trails / first real world use the brakes were a real weak spot, getting so over heated that the Loyds were having to stop every few miles to let them cool down enough to regain some form of steering!

Loyd did a redesign with Girling which was tested in December 1940 and the resulting larger diameter drum / sprocket carrier casting is a unique Loyd part. There was a retrofit kit to bring all MKIs to MKII standard as the original setup was basically useless! It was available at £62. 6. 4. :-)

According to a letter by Vivian himself, the MKII was in production no later than 23rd April 1941, presumably some time before.

Edited by ajmac
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You have hit on an interesting part of Loyd Carrier development there!

 

Originally the very early vehicles (MKI) used 7V drums / Bendix brakes with a plate and sprocket bolted on the front, all part of the short development schedule and business case to the government, i.e. it's all proven technology.... However research in the archive has shown that in extended trails / first real world use the brakes were a real weak spot, getting so over heated that the Loyds were having to stop every few miles to let them cool down enough to regain some form of steering!

Loyd did a redesign with Girling which was tested in December 1940 and the resulting larger diameter drum / sprocket carrier casting is a unique Loyd part. There was a retrofit kit to bring all MKIs to MKII standard as the original setup was basically useless! It was available at £62. 6. 4. :-)

According to a letter by Vivian himself, the MKII was in production no later than 23rd April 1941, presumably some time before.

 

They're still bloody hard to turn when the brakes are hot! No matter how hard you yank on the lever

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They're still bloody hard to turn when the brakes are hot! No matter how hard you yank on the lever

That's why the later machines had big gussets added to the tillers.....drivers must have been bending them trying to turn! Remember that Loyd like every early war British designed and built tracked vehicle left a lot to be desired in almost every aspect :-)

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