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GMC Number 7 Set


R Cubed
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gmc breakdown vehicles known as "set no 7"were based on long and short chassis and fitted with a pulley block with a hoisting capacity of 500kg on a monorail. they were tobe used for towing broken down or disabled vehicles. they could also be used for transporting equipment or supplies where the pulley block could be used for loading purposes.

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Hi Richard, as Blazerman says they were used for light recovery but mainly lifting engines etc in field repair shops. They were not factory fitted to 352's which as you know were designed as gun tractors but not to say they were not field fitted by a unit which managed to 'acquire' one. Post war the French in particular commonly fitted 352's with No 7 sets. I have heard several manufacturers names mentioned but as usual I can't remember them:embarrassed:

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Not just a GMC fitment; somewhere I have a photo of a Chevy 1 1/2 ton cargo fitted with a 7 set towing a jeep across a shallow river.

Not sure if the 7 set would need to be modified in this case, as the Chevy rear body is 5ft 10 wide internally, narrower than a GMC.

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Not just a GMC fitment; somewhere I have a photo of a Chevy 1 1/2 ton cargo fitted with a 7 set towing a jeep across a shallow river.

Not sure if the 7 set would need to be modified in this case, as the Chevy rear body is 5ft 10 wide internally, narrower than a GMC.

 

In Pat Ware's Red Ball Xpress book - I suspect this is a U.S. proving ground view, possibly a trials vehicle. Never seen any combat photos.

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Not just a GMC fitment; somewhere I have a photo of a Chevy 1 1/2 ton cargo fitted with a 7 set towing a jeep across a shallow river.

Not sure if the 7 set would need to be modified in this case, as the Chevy rear body is 5ft 10 wide internally, narrower than a GMC.

 

Possibly you found it here: http://www.mapleleafup.org/forums/showthread.php?p=54940?

 

I found that picture while searching the source listed below. It is the only picture of such a conversion I have ever seen. Must have been a one-off field conversion, though I would not be surprised to learn this conversion has been carried out in more than one field ;)

 

Title: A one-and-a-half ton truck with wrecker mount pulling in a jeep during maneuvers somewhere in New Caledonia

 

Source: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/catalog.html

Digital ID: fsa 8e01243 Source: digital file from intermediary roll film

Reproduction Number: LC-USW33-027852-ZC (b&w film neg.)

Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540

8e01243r.jpg

Edited by mcspool
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Thanks all for the input, what I am trying to also find out is if the 352 is an Artillery tractor and towed the 105mm as we all know, what was used to change gun barrels and parts on these guns in the field workshops.

Was the No7 set only for Artillery ? if it was not a factory fitment how were these jobs carried out ?

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The '7' set in my CCKW has a pully block manufactured by Yale, would anybody know where I could obtain service/operating manuals from?

Have tried searching the net, but unable to find anything.

would you have a pic of your pulley block shop nut? our jeep had a pulley/winch type thing mounted on the front when we bought it also made my yale.

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But orriginally it was not designed for vehicle recovery , its use was too load bombs or heavy parts into the GMC body

 

I haven't heard that before. The bomb service truck was different, it had a much larger and longer lifting frame than the No7 and Bart lists it as being available from 1942.

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Thanks all for the input, what I am trying to also find out is if the 352 is an Artillery tractor and towed the 105mm as we all know, what was used to change gun barrels and parts on these guns in the field workshops.

Was the No7 set only for Artillery ? if it was not a factory fitment how were these jobs carried out ?

 

If a 353 with No 7 set wasn't available perhaps a Dodge WC52 or winch fitted jimmy could have been used with a lifting frame mounted on the front. I don't know this for fact Richard, it just seems a reasonable assumption.

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