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Great War truck

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I am sure that these rear wheels are adapted tank idler wheels. I sold lots of these  ex. Ministry in the late 1970s for use as traction engine rubber tyres, the centres were trepanned out , the remaining band cut open and re rolled to suit the required radius and then welded or bolted to the engine wheels, generally worked out quite successful.

Richard Peskett.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I found this Th. Schneider engine, it is a fairly big engine.. Anyone an idea what these engines were fitted in? Thanks, Marcel

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2 hours ago, Cel said:

I found this Th. Schneider engine, it is a fairly big engine.. Anyone an idea what these engines were fitted in? Thanks, Marcel

 

 

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Purely a guess but could the '30' refer to the 3030cc moteur produced in the 1920s?

 

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5 hours ago, radiomike7 said:

 

Here is a bit of Th.Schneider history for you.  That engine was made after 1919 and before 1924.   The Société anonyme des automobiles Th. Schneider was registered at Besançon on 16 June 1910. Vehicle production finally ended early in 1930.  The manufacturer started out producing a range of cars with side valve 4-cylinder and 6-cylinder engines. In most respects these were conventional cars, apart from the "dashboard mounted" radiators, positioned ahead of the driver but behind the (front mounted) engine.  By the time war broke out in August 1914, the Th. Schneider range comprised seven 4-cylinder engine cars with engine sizes that ranged from 1.8-litres to 6.1-litres.  There was also a 3.2-litre 6-cylinder engine model. The engine capacities were 2,292cc, 3,030cc, 3,958cc and 5,500cc.  The cars offered for the 1920 model year were not strikingly different from those that had been offered before the war, but the radiators were mounted in front of the engines.  Overhead valve engines were available from 1922 as well as sidevalves until about 1924.  The company was declared bankrupt for the first time in November 1921, but was able to persuade the court to permit resumption of its activities thirteen months later.   Th. Schneider was then able to enjoy several years of successful business due to the excellent reputation of its cars.  Nevertheless, financial problems hit the business again in 1928, ending in a second bankruptcy in March 1929.  Production was progressively run down, presumably in order to use up existing inventory, but early in 1930 the factory doors were closed for the last time.

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16 hours ago, lynx42 Rick Cove said:

Here is a bit of Th.Schneider history for you.  That engine was made after 1919 and before 1924.   

Many thanks, I presume that is because of the radiator fan? Until now I have not come across a picture of the same engine. It looks fairly big for a car although not impossible but I like the tank idea! There is some kind of gear wheel installed behind the clutch, what could this be used for?

 

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I found  that the tanks had a engine with 2 seperate cast 2 cylindre blocks. So this might be a bit more modern. From a schneider / kegresse halftrack maybe?

 

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Regarding the Schneider engine, it could be from a variety of non military sources, The dustcart version could still be seen on the streets of Paris in the late 1950s early 60s.. Large numbers were in use in Paris as the main stay of the motor omnibus fleet, over  1200 model H were in use from 1916 to 1938 and in addition over 50 six wheel the H6 version saw service from 1923 until 1938. Also the Solex radiator is often confuses the make of vehicle De Dion Bouton, Schneider and even Mercedes.

 

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Richard Peskett.

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7 hours ago, Richard Peskett said:

Regarding the Schneider engine, it could be from a variety of non military sources, The dustcart version could still be seen on the streets of Paris in the late 1950s early 60s.. Large numbers were in use in Paris as the main stay of the motor omnibus fleet, over  1200 model H were in use from 1916 to 1938 and in addition over 50 six wheel the H6 version saw service from 1923 until 1938. Also the Solex radiator is often confuses the make of vehicle De Dion Bouton, Schneider and even Mercedes.

 

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Richard Peskett.

When I was restoring my 1916 Albion back in 1978, I went to look at some solid rubber tyres at a place called Jerralang Junction in Victoria Australia, as I had heard that there was the remains of an old truck there.  It turned out to be a Schneider with the Solex radiator and the 5 spoke wheels. There was nothing left except a small section of the chassis, the radiator and the two front wheels with grey semicircular (in section) tyres.  I brought home the wheels and I still have them but I should also have taken the radiator. It went to scrap not long after I went to see the bits.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Found this a while ago, A Riemann acetylene lamp with integrated generator. As it is of tin and not of brass it think it might be a WW1 version. It was advertised as a mining lamp and covered in a fat coat of black and silver paint. At the inside idid  find this gray/mustard coloured paint. So i did paint the complete lamp with it. What do you think of it? Glass 18cms. Helas the text on the plate was rusted beyond recognition.

 

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Edited by Citroman
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11 hours ago, Citroman said:

Another nice monster, i see double wheels on the trailer, might this be the normal road wheels of the truck?

 

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No, the wheels on the trailer have long hubcaps and the Latil doesn't have any hubcaps. The Latil wheels are also larger in diameter to those being carried on the trailer. Whilst this is a WW1 photo, the tracks look like those on the Char B1 tank produced just before WW2.

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