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WW1 finds and discoveries


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We had a trip out to East Yorkshire today and collected this 1908 Singer. It is believed to have been converted to a lorry for war work in Aberdeenshire during WWI but we only have documentation going

A wartime period Velie has turned up in Lithuania of all places. It looks to be in good condition but the owner thinks it is a White apparently. Many of these US built trucks were used by the French a

Here is my WW-1 find and hope to add enough parts to rebuild back to its original grandeur.  This engine is a 1917 Riker (Locomobile) truck engine.   More Riker parts are likely to exist in Britain an

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1 hour ago, Citroman said:

It's an interesting engine with all those brass plugs on top.

Access to the valves and adaptors for the plugs?

I am intrigued by the crankcase which appears to have space for another pair of cam followers.

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The plugs are to access the valves which are typical of a fixed-head engine. The Thorny and the Dennis are the same. The centre plugs must be a simpler way of sealing off the water jacket instead of a flanged cover with studs.

You are right, the apparent spare follower positions are intriguing. To someone who knows what the engine is, they will be the main clue!

It is amazing what is about even 100 years later.

Steve  :)

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Hi, Steve.

Thunderbolt and lightning (very very frightening) here, so spending a few moments indoors. Might your mystery engine be a Georges Richard. I have some more photographs somewhere, but can't lay my hands on them just now. In the meantime, this will have to suffice. It's something I found online a while ago when I was looking for engines suitable for the 1906 Barford and Perkins C/C2 roller. Not identical, but the shape of the timing case caught my eye. So far as the spare tappet covers are concerned: might these hide cams for the trip gear of a low-tension ignition system? It is the inlet side of the engine - where igniters are typically located.

605349872_GeorgesRichard.JPG.032f8b55ce60ead4f5e8aaa12dbb84d0.JPG

Regards

Andy

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This Unic engine is different in detail, but does hint at the possible purpose of the extra cam follower holes. 

https://images.app.goo.gl/RNmcY5iHDjkEkm1F8

Though actually I don't know what those extra levers do. I did think possibly low-tension sparkers ("long mingling spark") but there are (maybe conventional) spark plugs. Albeit with weird HT connectors and possibly some levers. 

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21 minutes ago, andypugh said:

This Unic engine is different in detail, but does hint at the possible purpose of the extra cam follower holes. 

https://images.app.goo.gl/RNmcY5iHDjkEkm1F8

Though actually I don't know what those extra levers do. I did think possibly low-tension sparkers ("long mingling spark") but there are (maybe conventional) spark plugs. Albeit with weird HT connectors and possibly some levers. 

Assuming there is no magneto, maybe it has something like a trembler coil and those rods that appear to be activated by the camshaft are operating the rods that link to the spark plugs,  therefore acting as a distributor, make and breaking at the plugs?

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On 7/17/2020 at 9:41 PM, Cel said:

Not sure whether these are WW1, I think later. Anyone ever heard of the 'Truck and Tractor Appliance'? This is the only link I can find on the www: https://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EPW034851

My friend took the pictures last week, he thinks it is a front (steering) axle. 

Thanks

Marcel

5ac1374f-11c1-4afc-bf14-6e42723d223b.jpg

5cdf26a7-5b04-4c00-b452-d962fe0f9dd3.jpg

Never come across this name before. Some piece of agricultural equipment i suppose?

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Here is my WW-1 find and hope to add enough parts to rebuild back to its original grandeur.  This engine is a 1917 Riker (Locomobile) truck engine.   More Riker parts are likely to exist in Britain and other European countries than in the US due to the Great War.

Al

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Well that is an excellent start.  Is that mounting frame part of an original chassis?  It looks to be too complex just for a transit frame.

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Hello Gordon,

No the support frame is just that a fabricated stand to stabilize the engine and keep it off the floor.  I am hoping my new friends on the east side of the pond to keep an eye open for bits and pieces that can be used to resurrect this Riker, another Great War Truck..

Al

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