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  1. Actually, this isn't really a military item. Some years ago, it was realised by Greyhound owners that, as their racing dogs aged, they missed the track, they missed their friends and rivals and generally became depressed. But, chasing the hare proved all too much. So, White City introduced a veterans' day for retired racing greyhounds. It included some bottom-sniffing, a set of lamp posts were set up for competitive pi**ing (height achieved, quantity and colour were all judged) and the highlight was the closing event... the veterans' race. Chasing after a hare at their age would have clearly been impossible and so... thinking back to their childhood fairy tales the organisers remember the tale of the hare and the tortoise. This is one of the tortoises which were pulled, very slowly round the track in front of the old dogs.... I'll get my coat.
    6 points
  2. Something all of us know. 🤣
    4 points
  3. Bad weather's no longer a problem, I’ve just extended the garage😬 The wife had mixed emotions and started shouting something about a Fox Hat !! no idea what she was saying as I had the grinder going🤔
    4 points
  4. What, like all those GMCs registered as 1939 in the 1980s? 😉
    3 points
  5. Spare wheel fitting. This has been an on going mission for some time, and it has turned into a complete saga worthy of a telling by the great Bernhard Cribbins on Jackanory, except he would have to read it after the watershed time so as not to give the kids nightmares. It started last winter when son Stuart and I set out to fit the recently reconditioned carrier parts back on. All seemed to go well except we ran out of the right size bolts and had to leave a couple of bits off. We also left off some of the cross bracing to allow access to the air intake pipes and compressor condenser unit, which was yet to be refurbished and fitted. As you can see access is difficult, and I've still got the return pipe to squeeze in. One other bit still needing attention was the foot plate that secures the wheel when in the stowed position. I had difficulty in obtaining the right width of Balata strip Finally got some, and a selection of extra long bifurcated rivets. The wheel itself was cleaned and painted a couple of months back so we were ready to go It's a bit of a fight to the death to get the wheel onto the carrier as you have to wedge it in between the side of the pump box and the carrier. And it's a tad heavy too. Got it on in the end and began to wind it up. Bit of brake adjustment was required along the way to stop it unwinding by itself, and things were looking good. Until it got jammed halfway up. It appeared that now I have pumped the tyre up to the right pressure, it has grown too fat to fit on the carrier and gets stuck on the side. So wind it back down, and scratch head for a bit, needs some spacers behind it to move it over a bit. So fight the wheel off, make and fit some spacers, fight to get it back on and wind it up again. All good this time, so well pleased with the result. That was a fortnight ago!! This week got the condenser and pipework fitted and set about fitting the remaining cross bracing. None of the bolt holes want to line up, the whole carrier frame is leaning over toward the cab. More head scratching. Right, slacken all the bolts and use a ratchet strap to pull it over a bit. Fit the braces and tighten the bolts back up. Worked well, all bits fitted, all bolts tight, job done, wind wheel back up Except it gets stuck!! This time on the other side, on the pump box. Needless to say there was a few words, which will not get printed here, and the wheel comes down again, this time to remove the spacers, because now the frame is straight, there is loads of room on the carrier side. Finally, after all the aggro it is all fitted and it winds right up and can be stowed correctly Hopefully it will not need to come down again, ever!!
    3 points
  6. Robert with the deepest of respect take a deep breath and go and sit in the shade old friend Best regards Pete
    2 points
  7. Guys, Yes, I regularly correspond with Mike Starmer and we both agree that seeing a colour photo of a British & Commonwealth Army truck or non-armoured type from WW2 is very rare and often corrupted by the type of colour film but here are some from my collection showing the early G3 / G4 scheme used before SCC.2; This line up of the first Canadian troops to be posted to the UK and I believe they date from 1940. Most of the Canadian CMPs are equipped with CMP 11 Cabs and Bedford & Morris vehicles with aero screens etc Last is an ambulance which I can only guess is in SSC.2 from an unknown date, that shows SCC.2 was mostly brown with a touch of green to it. It was a gift from the Canadian Red Cross.
    2 points
  8. A few shots of Tomo’s effort's today as phase one comes to a close . I think the photos speak for themselves as I can’t praise Tomo enough for his work plus it’s been a good excuse to have a beer each evening to discuss the finer points including “never show a rivet a full brush”
    2 points
  9. You may laugh, but one project I was involved with a while ago was the "environmentally friendly torpedo". Andy
    2 points
  10. My dad was the development manager at Muir Hill and was in charge of provision of this specially adapted 171 to the MOD. We went to St Kilda twice for the initial tests and the wading tests. I have some super 8 film of the tests. I will try to put them on here. Keith Trinder
    2 points
  11. exactly, and i was trying to help, give us the location, the government can't assassinate everyone thats been on this forum. bugger what's that red dot tracking across the wall? 😣...................................................................................
    2 points
  12. top coated the frame yesterday and left the dry so today started to fit all the bits back next week i plan to rebuild the axles this will include resetting the crown wheel and pinion, new bearings and oil seals
    2 points
  13. We call that a "Bloomer Loaf" so the pedal must hence forth be called a Bloomer Pedal 😄 Ron
    2 points
  14. Hi Ron, though I’d share with you an image of the original fuel tank, you can still see it attached to the fuel tap🙈😂
    2 points
  15. Not much progress at the moment, I’ve managed to bare metal the roof and it’s not as bad as I thought 🤥 A couple of coats of bonda to protect it and show what needs repairing Now ......I don’t want to blow my own trumpet.......but .......I pretty confident that when I am finished you won’t see a single repair !! You’ll see about 50 😬
    2 points
  16. Reminds me of the Father Ted episode where he damaged the prize car for the raffle and then attempted to tap out the dent.
    2 points
  17. I have just discovered this thread. My grandfather George Thorpe was chief steward on the HMS Vandyck.I have his account of the bombing and his subsequent internment written in pencil at the time in a very small leather journal.As well as his account it also contains addresses of several men onboard and their wives.It is very interesting as to his take on what happened in the original bombing,and includes dramatic scenes of the struggle at sea to Bleik.If it is of interest to anyone I would be happy to write most of it out verbatim.
    2 points
  18. You may have fun with the council planning people. I tried and failed to obtain planning permission for a building to store my MVs because no-one outside our "bubble" understands MVs, and the local council considers anything connected with them to be commercial. Andy
    2 points
  19. Just received the results FBHVC Press Release 17.11.2020__ - National Historic Vehicle Survey Results.pdf
    2 points
  20. Here is an interesting image. Photographed in Tunisia in 1930.
    2 points
  21. We used to bang 4" nails into a plank and bend them round pram wheel axels!!!
    2 points
  22. I personally don't have a problem with replicas as long as they are not portrayed as originals. I think that anyone who puts the effort into restoring anything is worthy of praise, the only exception, in my mind, are those who pay to have the work done and the then tell everyone that they restored the item themselves, why not just be honest. As for not using the correct thickness of steel, sometimes there seems to be little point, unless it can be seen and the in a lot of cases it can be packed out to look correct if you are using thinner material or ground back, if it is slightly too thick. If you take my Panzer 2 for example, what would be the point of using the correct thickness steel, apart to help rigidity, it only adds weight, increases cost and adds stress to the the running gear, apart from which even if I were to use the correct thickness steel, it still isn't armoured. I could of course spend a fortune on original fittings but why bother, it is after all a replica and everything that I produce is copied or built to scale. Apart from which, the whole project was purly an engineering exercise, for my own pleasure, to see if I could produce the components at home. If you have the ability, motivation and the imagination, build what you like but like what you build and when you have finished, take satisfaction in what you have achieved and don't worry about the rivet counters, most of them have neither the ability, motivation or imagination to start, let alone finish, a project. Jon
    2 points
  23. You are too kind, Ed. We only do it for the fun of it and the friends we make around the world. Steve
    2 points
  24. It was a French scrapyard that the previous Dutch collector bought it from. I had it shipped here on a Dutch trailer with an English tractor unit and a Polish driver. A truly European effort.
    2 points
  25. I expect Lex can sell you one Andrew......For about 1 1/2 times the value of your G3😏 Bloody expensive door stops. Ron
    2 points
  26. Bit more progress on the Tanker this weekend. Down to the small bits now, the five minute jobs that take all day. Fuel filter/sediment bowl fitted and a quick test. Felt it was worth a short video, as she ticked over without stalling. Bit too slow mind and still needs adjusting. Now the fuel tank is fitted, next job wire up the fuel gauge. Connecting the sender is fun, working through a small hole in the pump room floor. Five cables to cram in, on the right terminals. Then the dashboard end, which is not quite as bad. Took the steering wheel off to get better access, but still managed to scrape off a fair bit of paint, which will need touching up later. Good news is the gauge works, and appears to be spot on accurate Which is more than can be said of the tank gauge, which is showing about 5 gallon more than is actually in the tank. Horn went in next, refitting the original one that has been cleaned up and adjusted. Not exactly loud for a truck this size, but a healthy beep, beep that will do the job. Moved on to the lights. I wired in the brakes and indicators a while ago, so at least we had the important ones when we drove over to the workshop for painting the tank earlier in the year. Now side, tail and head lamps get the benefit, and the new rear marker lights I recently fitted. Plugging them in under the dash was the easy bit, clipping in all the conduit takes the time Near side head and side light wires here, under the front bumper. Originally they were 2 BA screws into threaded holes. All of them sheared off during the dismantling process, so I have drilled them right out now and put nuts on the inside. Still 2 BA so reasonably authentic. Switch on and get a very bright pair of "un Militant" lamps. Bought on fleebay, they were listed for Land Rover, but fit into standard military shells nicely, just replace the 12 volt bulbs with a pair of 24 volt zenon truck bulbs. 110watts on dipped beam, can't wait to try them in the dark. Might actually be able to see where we are going. Thinking I was on a roll, I cracked on with the rear markers, and then, it all went pear shaped. Struck down by the curse of the elastic tape measure, to begin with. Nice new loom in new conduit that is about 6" too short to plug in. Don't quite know how I managed that one. Near side went in nicely, but that had a different issue Spot the schoolboy error! nearly fried the whole truck with this one. Double connector looks just right in the little clip. But, of course, it is a dead short to earth, not that I noticed until I tried plugging it in. There were many sparks and a rather scorched terminal. Singles look untidy, but at least they work. Got there in the end, and now have a full set of lights, including a couple of extra modifications for the modern times, like a reversing lamp and hazard lights. Back to the downside, dynamo has stopped charging again. Last time it was dirty contacts in the control box, and after a good clean up it was all was fine. A check of plugs and wiring this time, and it seems to be the same problem. Although, I may have blown the fuse inside, with the dodgy marker light. Either way the box is off again, and back in the home workshop for further investigation tomorrow. Sounds easy, but to get to it the drivers seat has to come out and the main electrical junction box on the back of the seat frame has to go as well. Another 5 minute job that took half an hour. Last job today take a picture of the whole thing. More than a bit pleased with how she is shaping up. Certainly be ready for next years show season
    2 points
  27. Yes, but the man that never had a ****-cart, or made a mistake never made anything. These jobs are only for the brave... and its looking good. Dave
    2 points
  28. Hi Ted, thanks for the pics. Unfortunately it has the model B 4 cylinder engine. 4 tons and 52 BHP is not an ideal driving experience (apart from economy). I’ve had a shot of the V8 engined heavy unit (the late Mick Paul’s) when I took a trip down to Cannock in 1993 (drove the 7V all the way down there and back!). ATB Peter
    1 point
  29. Thanks for all your help and advice. I will always make sure I carry plenty of water to try and cool things down. Maybe we should all park our military vehicles up through the summer and only take them out when its snowing!
    1 point
  30. It's a firm from Arras Travaux Publics ?????? & Fils.
    1 point
  31. All left hand shaded as original ( I hope ! )
    1 point
  32. p101040.MOV is the link to the jeep running in the work shop
    1 point
  33. Brilliant turn out some fine vehicles on display.
    1 point
  34. What a beautiful boy. Good luck with it
    1 point
  35. What an excellent thread, Andy. It is the quality of threads like this, and the Gosling gentlemen documenting their projects, that drove me to register on HMVF and post my own limited efforts. I have enjoyed it enormously. Having seen the lorry in the flesh I can say how good it looks in the "flesh". Cheers Dave
    1 point
  36. 43 FK 50 TO 43 FK 99 44 FK 01 T0 44 FK 19 02 FK 92 TO 02 FK 96 [ police vans 41 FK 77 TO 41 FK 83 ] 46 FK 63 TO 48 FK 62 your number appears to have been sold 1973
    1 point
  37. There were 250JU's on Contract No. WV7867 in the FJ range of ARN's. Going by a little booklet I have with all vehicles in the FJ range, here are the 250JU numbers: Morris 250JU Minibus 13 seat WV7867 Asset Code 1144-0233 14FJ13 to 15FJ38 Morris 250JU Left hand drive Minibus 13 seat 15FJ64 to 16FJ25 Morris 250JU Van WV7867 Asset Code 2610-0233 31FJ21 to 31FJ41 BMC 250JU Minibus 13 seat WV7867 Asset Code 1144-0233 52FJ72 to 53FJ11 Hope this might be of use to you.
    1 point
  38. Petrol Tank?................
    1 point
  39. Just to clarify a living van is different to a motor caravan. A living van carries goods.
    1 point
  40. I am afraid that John Wardle is wrong about living vans and the new regulations. An answer to a recent parliamentary question on this point, amongst others said: "The vehicles operated by the Ministry of Defence are within the scope of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. Vehicles that were originally built as heavy goods vehicles but have been converted to be a living van (under the C&U regulations definition) are within the scope of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2020. Vehicles of historical interest, as defined in the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) Regulations 2020, will be exempt from these regulations irrespective of the load. However, if such a vehicle is being used commercially, it is not exempted from these regulations, as it is important to balance the granting of any exemptions with the safety of all road users. Date and time of answer: 11 Jan 2021 at 12:15." John
    1 point
  41. found some old photos when i was doing the usmc jeep
    1 point
  42. For a running engine that rocker shaft looks very dry. Might just be the video but is it getting an oil feed OK?
    1 point
  43. Great teamwork, an excellent job!
    1 point
  44. It’s always worth popping it on eBay. A few years ago I replaced a really cheap looking vintage plastic damper knob off my old Enfield WD/CO and through it in the bin (literally from about 10 foot away). I fitted the £30 NOS knob and was chuffed to have “fixed” this issue. About a week later I saw this know in the bin and thought I’d pop it on eBay. To my surprise it got a bid, then another, and then messages wanting to ‘buy it now’. It sold for something like £280 to a guy in Malaysia. He backed out the next day with a lame excuse and I offered it to the next highest bidder. He asked for more photos and subsequently purchased it. It turned out to be very rare and from a 1938 Triumph Tiger (if I remember correctly). i learnt not to throw stuff out from that, well not to until I’d confirmed it as junk. that again paid off when I removed a modern looking push button switch off my Jeep. It turns out after purchasing my Halftrack that it’s the starter button for said vehicle. So I now have a good replacement starter switch.
    1 point
  45. Still a lot of airfields left in the UK. Good to see there are some people driving in a little group. A few friends of mine came over in their Renegade Jeep to join my brother and me in his Jeep during the heatwave. Will be strange coming September to basically have no events for market Garden.
    1 point
  46. A chap in Denmark had some made, excellent quality, I'll see if he has any left. See picture. Cheers, Lex
    1 point
  47. I'd be interested to hear it Richard. I've heard of plenty of people who have had gearbox problems in private ownership. We assumed it was because it was basically a Ferret box, but a more powerful engine and more weight to shift?
    1 point
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