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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/22/2021 in Posts

  1. welcome aboard Toby !
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  2. Kids messing, £5 for the first one to tell me the answer, there very resourceful !
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  3. Hi Steve I’ve measured the one on my gpw in situ, the measurement is taken off the end of the prop in the picture below
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  4. sounds like you have a propshaft for a post war CJ Jeep, they are longer https://forums.g503.com/viewtopic.php?t=154947
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  5. Nothing to do with an asset code, when they got to the end of the numbers-letters-numbers series they started the letters-numbers-letters series. My newer Wolf is HP63AA but my older Lightweight is 57KB22. Chris
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  6. Also known as Springer and had inherent steering problems, hence the disposal of them after a very short service life.
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  7. spent today removing all the rusty panels and patches have ground up all the spot welds there is a lot of steel to put back just need to do a bit of panel beating to dress all the edge angles then strip down the only two combat wheels and axles then off to taffy the best blaster in the north west
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  8. have done the lights indicators for the grill and head / side lights fitted just need to do the indicators in the back lights will draw out the wire diagram for you when i cut out all the rust will post the damage for you there is a large number of drilled holes i need to weld up for you there is going to be a lot of body filling and sanding for you the body filling is better going over the red primer. Have put all the bolts from the parts i take off with them so it will be easer for you to rebuild your jeep
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  9. today job was to strip down the jeep body and cut all the rust out tomorrow then its of to the scrap yard 😏 sorry the sand blasters all ways get the two mixed up with old jeeps all the best jerry
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  10. My brother has a trials shirt, I think he picked up ridiculously cheap aswell. Recently doing an archaeological hunt trying to find my half of the bunk bed I came across it again as it's been buried amidst everything else he leaves lying around I discovered the savage had cut the rank tab off the front which in itself I think is high treason but worse yet he'd done such a bad job of it that it looks like where Jeremy Clarkson cut a piece out of James May's car on the Nile road trip.
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  11. Evening all, after having been a member on here for a little while now and following with great interest the various restoration threads I thought it was about time I posted some pictures illustrating the rebuild I’m currently undertaking on my 1919 Thornycroft J type. A brief history of the vehicle first I think. ED-1617 left the Basingstoke works on 21st November 1919 having been assigned chassis number J-7860, being delivered to dealer J.Melbourne of Warrington, Cheshire. It would appear they held the vehicle in stock for just over a year until eventually being sold to Joseph Brierley
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  12. I went to Widnes/Runcorn to value it at the turn of the century, another pic of its history for you.
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  13. After our first few rendezvous with the new J type it became apparent there was an issue with the gearbox. The lorry was by this point booked in to the steam fair at Beamish and so I decided to strip and investigate the issue straight away. With the help of a good friend the gearbox was dropped out from the lorry, and then stripped. This was back in January last year and so a full rebuild had not thus been decided. It was nice to find a visual issue, in the form of a snapped key shared between second and third gear on the lay shaft. The bolts holding second and third
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  14. I can make balls really easily. Just send me a drawing.
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  15. Thanks Burwood, it's nice to know that there's someone out there. Evening All, Continuing with turret gearbox, the next item that I needed to make was the handwheel. Not quite as simple as around disc as it contains a remote trigger for the MG34. It would have been a casting but as I don't have that option, I fabricated it. It started life as a flat piece of 10mm thick steel plate which I cut, turned and then added the relevant bosses. A quick grind with a burr and a shot blast made it look something like the original. Then the wall of the bosses need
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  16. I recently discovered that my 1940 Royal Enfield WD/C had been fitted with a later (WD/CO type) front frame section. Apparently these frames are quite weak and under the duress of heavy duty army work, it was quite common for them to break at the front down tube. So the heavier duty CO frame would often have been fitted. I acquired a correct 1940 front frame from a fellow RE enthusiast, resprayed and fitted it. Fortunately it's just possible to swap the front frames without disturbing the engine/gearbox etc. I've copied the markings from a series of army trials pictures. Ron
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  17. Is that a Serious question?
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  18. Finally got a decent days weather to do a bit more on Tanker work. I thought I was done with the cut and weld malarky ages ago, and was well peeved when I found these holes in the pump room floor the other week. Can't pretend I didn't see it and just hope it goes away, so dust off welder and fetch the grinder again Might as well chop the whole square out, because the remaining metal is pretty thin as well. Corralex sheet stuffed underneath helps to protect the diesel tank top from sparks. Weld in new plate. It's 3mm thick so a lot more forgiving than thin b
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  19. Tomo T comments regards these being a prototype is always a fair point. The build register shows the use of the M4 engine being available from July 1913, however it appears the L4 engine continued to be more popular by demand. Well at least more were supplied in lorries passing out of the factory. The point of sending them to the Colonies also raises issues, for many are listed as being supplied to the home market. Tozer, Kemsley and Fisher were exporting agents also sending products from many other different manufactures all about the world. Although their name appears regularly on th
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  20. The cab is starting to take shape
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  21. A lot of uncharted territory here and considerable differences from the 'Subsidy' model, which was in full production not long after this was supposedly built ? I wonder if it was an experimental model, (J 04) later sold off to the colonies ? Engine mountings are straight forward enough on later J types, all you need is some heavy 3 inch angle iron as shown here. The other side is just a 1" whit diameter pivot, which supports a bushed rocking bar between the two engine mountings, thus providing a bit of 'give' when the chassis flexed. If you have a 1 inch hole at thi
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  22. I was mistaken with the gearbox case and fooled by the silver paint;- it is steel, with a lathe turned finish. More details around the petrol tank. The right side member must be original as it is shaped to take the hand brake mechanism. Nice filler and the petcock can be restored. The gap under the fixing straps must have held something, not the seat as the tank is too lightly fabricated to take the weight.
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  23. Just a quick update Gave the garage a good clear out ready for the next step 🙄 didn’t want to be tripping over any rusty off cuts. The roof section is obviously worse than I thought, loads of filler and old repairs. Believe it or not the top looks better than the underside 😩 Same problem as before, all the rusted out areas have been previously repaired so I have no original patterns to follow, hopefully the previous restorer repaired like for like. Wish me luck!! 🤨
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  24. Nice big garage, but Memphis Belle really needs her own hangar!!
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  25. The workshop contents were back-breaking to carry and we seemed to be lifting boxes out of the trailer for some time without any signs of it becoming more empty!! We made one more trip after that, bringing home some lounge furniture, some camping gear and some of the 1940's kit. I think we're going to have an easier day tomorrow to avoid burn out.
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  27. get the new step there is a difference not much i can work around it
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  28. Stef that is effectively a matching numbers bike (Triumph did it like that at that time) TL 53184 is the 2767th bike from 3000 from contract C8886 which were delivered between Ocr44 and Feb45. I calculate the tank census number to be C4856946. Ron
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  29. Close up of the horse and cart, the building in the background has a name on the side, just cant make it out. Thanks for the ID Adrian, i would never have got it .
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  30. I googled Rue de Lille, there's a couple, so don't think it's the one in Paris, so that leaves Armentieres and Villeneuve D'Asq, on the west and east of Lille, the last one seems more likely, but will need time to find more, an then it could be half a mile away from that street..... Lex
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  32. heater or speaker for radio seen this before i am going to strip the axles next and get them blasted along with the 2 combat rims will phone universal next week and get two more rims and order the tyres from john grey
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  33. Good luck with the move and in the new house,
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  34. Here is the label off of mine and a picture of the lamps in use with the military Police. I also have the arrow shield with mine.
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  35. The left stub axle has a 'J' stamped on it. Kingpin brass covers missing.
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  36. The diff Precautionary flitching at midships promoted a large crack at the rear and so a repair was required
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  37. The gearbox, quite different to the later type. The top cover is a brass pressing. Timber engine mounts, surely this can't be right? Gear quadrant is part dismantled so is out of position.
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  38. Bodging or improvise and overcome? There has been much discussion on this forum and other sites about extra lights on your MV for travelling to and from shows. I'm very much in favour of it, there have been far too many accidents to MV's over the years, a lot of which have been attributed to the other motorist not seeing the rear lights on the slower moving MV. Now you would like to think that a Militant would be able to with stand some clown running into the back, but if a fully loaded Stolly can get punted into the woods (see the thread about the one in Australia) a Militant coul
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  39. Here's one, but there are more:
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  40. The metal repair filler has the advantage of not soaking up moisture and bonds better to the metal than normal body filler, but it is more expensive indeed. As for the metal spraying, I don't think that is something you can do yourself as it seems to require quite special tools... But there are a few vids on youtube about the process.
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  41. The pile is only getting bigger🤨 I will hopefully be starting the roof next week so best order another sheet of steel 😁
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  42. Committed to resolving the diaphragm issue in the gearbox today which I have been putting off for a few weeks. Drained the oil and got back underneath, spanner in hand, for the tedious job of undoing bolts a fraction of a turn at a time through the letterbox. Getting quite swift at it the second time. This time I removed all the bits behind the diaphragm to see what was what. Then realised it's the clutch brake. Had been wondering what the diaphragm was for! Cleaned everything again, found nothing amiss, but realised if this is the clutch brake why does it have a prmanant
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  43. For the drag link I had expected the braze to be holding the tube in place fairly well. However as I machined off the tube it became obvious that there was quite a bit of clearance between the original 1-1/4x10swg tube and the forgings. As I turned down the diameter of the tube it started to tear so I peeled it off. The braze was only at the very end. I believe the first end was as it left the factory, the second end had been repositioned as part of the trailer conversion. For this end I used an angle grinder to thin the tube on both sides and then peeled it back. The bra
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  44. It’s been a busy few days, I’ve used every scrap of spare time in a big push to finish the back panel 🎉😬 22 separate pieces of sheet steel folded, joggled, curved and welded in....I must need my head seen too..... Managed to get the first coat of filler on last night and sprayed with bonda. This is the third time it was filled and sanded, it’s not perfect but I can live with it. Last bit of sanding was done by hand and was quicker than the sander. Had a dry run fitting the panel before paint, we’ve all heard the saying “ fits like
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  45. There are several points to consider. One is wire thickness, you may need to use a thinner one when doing work on these thin panel. Also the type of gas you are using, I use an Argon mix and it gives you a flatter weld. Balance of wire speed and amps is essential also gas pressure settings.. Regarding the fillet welds, I find that weave welding works well, I learnt this with gas welding 50 years ago. Then we were only taught gas and arc welding, I learnt MIG by trial and error much later, but I always remember what a welder once told me, if someone is welding with MIG it should sound like sizz
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  46. Quiet please, Teacher in class 👨‍🎓 Sit up at the back there, and I'll try to explain. This is one of the harder welds to do successfully. Might look simple, just fill the corner, but even experienced professional welders have to give it some thought to get a good finish. It's all to do with the magnetic field created by the welding arc. This is what draws the filler material (MIG wire or stick) into the joint as you weld. If you are doing a straight butt weld the magnetic effect is equal on both sides of the joint, and you can get a straight weld with nice coins that not only look
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