Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/01/2020 in Posts

  1. 1 point
  2. Absolutely brilliant! Very much a well done to you guys. The detail is superb.
    1 point
  3. And my wife has instructed me to tell you, that I made her a vegetarian quiche. Red Leicester pastry, with mushrooms, sugar snaps and sweet peppers, mixed with egg, pepper cream and more red Leicester topped with melted Cambozola. There, done as instructed. Jon
    1 point
  4. Hand Book on e-bay. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Leyland-Hippo-Drivers-Hand-Book-1945/333800488020?hash=item4db80f3c54:g:rKQAAOSwV3RfvNrx
    1 point
  5. I have the second manual but 2nd edition 1942.
    1 point
  6. It's been called a few things recently
    1 point
  7. Sat here in my office at my PC I have just caught sight of that Rotherhams oiler again and remembered about it. Will it do you to replace the squashed one?. Bar the threads it looks identical. Let me know
    1 point
  8. I can’t for the life of me remember how it all goes together but all the parts are available or can be made easy enough.
    1 point
  9. Any updates?. I was enjoying the rebuild.
    1 point
  10. You're probably right Lex. I think I tested mine by using 3BA screws and nuts as a gauge. I certainly wouldn't have anything 5/32". I'll take another look tomorrow to see the fit of 3BA. Ron
    1 point
  11. You can say that again, that is a fine sight and some superb workmanship.
    1 point
  12. I took my links off yesterday to install my new washers. I also replaced the top spindles with some NOS spindles that I've had for ages, mainly because of the nicer adjusting hex's. Ron
    0 points
  13. To keep fuel in the pipe and not drain away when the engine stops, a restricter.
    0 points
  14. The blue would not have been original to the Locomobile although it might be to the body. The only Locomobiles to carry bus bodies were fitted with redundant B-type bodies when more troop transport was needed later in the war. The only correct colour for the combination would therefore be khaki-green! Steve
    0 points
  15. Just an opinion, but they are original, and you are unlikely ever to need to use them, so I would keep them, patina and all.
    0 points
  16. I bought a series 2a a few years ago, it was born as a petrol but someone had put a 2.5 diesel in it, I think it was from an LDV. Where I live it's all small roads with very steep hills, I hated it but thought that I would change it for a 2.25 Land rover diesel to keep it all land rover. It was a good engine, no smoke and on normal roads quite acceptable but around here, I don't think so. So I did what I should have done in the beginning and put a 2.25 petrol in pure silk. Noisy old diesels, you can keep them. This is after rebuild. Jon
    0 points
  17. I am soon to retire and have for years promised myself a Scammell R100, I do not have either the space or the facilities to go full sized so I have "gone ride on/in" . Furlough made me re-think the start date and as I am about to return to work I thought I would post my progress. This will not be to millitary spec but as reused by my local fun fair family, Benson's of Dorking, I have had a fascination for this truck since my school days when I used to watch them being used to nose trailors in and out of the yard.
    0 points
  18. As best I can work out, the lorry was knocked down to scrap dealer (Sam the Scrap) at the Keeley Sale for £600. At the time it had a very (very) large tank on the chassis. I think the scrap man must have removed the tank as it then passed to a tractor dealer in Great Missenden as part of a deal. In many ways the absence of the tank helped me as it would have been too large to dispose of, and too risky to cut up with gas not knowing it's former contents. The lorry sustained a bit of damage along the way (bronze taps missing; fan assembly snapped off) etc. Ross the tractor dealer (a ve
    0 points
  19. Hung on those bent chassis ends, just where you left it... 😜
    0 points
  20. That really does look a good source of spares. Even the smallest items are invaluable to a restoration project. How did the tractor dealer come about it?
    0 points
  21. I see a month has passed since I posted last, but we have not been idle at the Scrap Bus and Lorry Works. The second SQ2 (the ex-Keeley sale Leyland that had landed up ebay with a tractor dealer), has been pushed into place ready to be stripped of its useful parts. This one was a bugger to move on account of most of the wheels refusing to revolve in the customary fashion. By the time we had got it around the corner with the telehandler, it was just starting to play ball but we have left a nice rubber trail in the road. I include an additional little pic of the rear-end damage to the
    0 points
  22. I don't think I have ever seen a banjo-bolt drilled through just one wall, the hole dia. looks about right. I would say it is a manufacture fault - best option to confirm - buy a new bolt , drilling through both walls would hardly weaken , I doubt if one hole matches the cross-section area of the anulus - that would cause some flow restriction BUT is it to create some back pressure requirement ? I doubt if any need on a spill-line return to tank ? One can only assume it was not a problem in the past ? If you compare the compression ratio petrol/diesel , you would think hand ba
    0 points
  23. Nice to see they’ve put some TLC into it but I prefer the original colour scheme.
    0 points
  24. It is indoors now Steve and they have painted it LGOC red, well red.
    0 points
  25. There is also this one of course at the Caister Castle Motor Museum. A scrap man called Goodey put the bus body into a lorry chassis in the 1960's and it has appeared in a number of films including 'Oh What a Lovely War'. The poor old thing has been left outside like this for some years and is not doing well when you look closely. It is a very strange museum as you are absolutely forbidden to take photographs. Someone has sneaked this one when they weren't looking. Hopefully, someone will give it some love one day. Steve.
    0 points
  26. Still no end to the pandemic and the team has not been together for some time. Steve has continued making the patterns for a new Radiator for the Dennis at his home in Leicestaershire whilst Tim has continued with his researches and writings at his own home in Oxfordshire. Tony back at base in Devon has been working on a new threaded Puller to enable us to get the very firmly stuck second back wheel off the Peerless.Some work now being done on the back wheel that we have taken off the old chassis and at present, work is going on to remove the wheel chain retention brackets - all heavily rusted
    0 points
  27. My progress is becoming glacial which is very frustrating. However, the 5/16" UNS tap and die turned up from China this week so I have made up four replacement spindles for the bonnet catches. There are now eight completed catches in stock for the two lorries when the time comes. I continue to press on with the Dennis radiator pattern but there is nothing of interest to show for the time being. I would like to finish it before Christmas though. Cheers! Steve
    0 points
  28. Have you checked valve clearances and injector wear? Also are you burning oil. The engine may just be clapped out.
    0 points
  29. Weather has been better the last two weekends round here, not brilliant, but dry and workable, so much has been achieved in Tanker world. Collared our Stuart to help me lift the cat walk on, last weekend, and take the tubes off to have their end caps fitted. Carried on with stripping out the pump cupboard valve gear. I was surprised how heavy it all is, feels like it is made out of quarter plate, each section is as much as you want to lift comfortably. Does leave a very oily, sticky mess. Looking into the pump itself, the gear appears to be in g
    0 points
  30. Thanks John, although I don't read or speak German I have ordered a copy, my wife likes challenges, she married me! Much appreciated Lex, it might contain some interesting insights. Jon
    0 points
  31. ..........and I thought that the superstition of "three's" was only an American thing!!!! 🙂 I would sure like to stumble on a set of three Riker parts trucks! I hope that these very fascinating Renault trucks can find an owner to show some love and attention and bring them back from the current "Dormant" state of affairs. Al
    0 points
  32. Ok, I have an original book printed by the SAE board in 1944, so in English, I will see if there's anything in it about track metallurgics. Cheers, Lex
    0 points
  33. Agreed, the Carlos Fandango rear wheels are quite striking though.
    0 points
  34. Yes, a lot have been. But not just by reenactors , a lot of them are converted by the Belgian army with their own make of paraliner and straps. Again with the Belgian flag on them. I have a couple of those. Most I do find RAC helmets with Belgian decals or painted Belgian flags on them, on bare metal leaving the rough finish on the rest of the shell. I prefer these to convert and the nicer ones without that flag I keep in my collection. Some of these Belgian used ones I removed their flag and painted a reconnaissance flash on it when wearing a Recce BD or tanksuit. This is the one I
    0 points
  35. This truck was used in an underground limestone quarry in the region. It was used to haul blocks out. Is it a Morris?
    0 points
  36. I don't know whether you've seen this (e-)book before, it specifically deals with Wehrmacht vehicle track structures & designs - perhaps it would be of help? https://www.amazon.co.uk/Panzerketten-Gleisketten-deutschen-Kettenfahrzeuge-Weltkrieges/dp/3943883000 It's in German, but I'd be happy to translate any specific sections for you if needed.
    0 points
  37. Hi. Martyn Thank you for the frame number photo .. This and the date on the Seat post confirm it's from contract c11465 for 150 triumph 3sw . The triumph factory in Coventry was adjacent to Coventry cathedral and through a series of raids was effectively destroyed in 1940 . Triumph set up a temporary factory at a site called Cape Warwick and effectively using surviving frames engines built the last 159 triumphs 3sws before relocating to Meriden where a new factory was established . After being relocated they shifted production to the triumph 3hw ..the overhead version of the bike .
    0 points
  38. Here a same model in the Renault factory courtyard.
    0 points
  39. Over 3 years after I first pictured it, the radio table is finally finished and painted. The flat fronted draw was not right so as a lockdown project, I started from scratch and built a new one with an angled front as original. Table now just needs drilling for the four shock mounts for the clips that secure the 19 Set’s wooden carrier to the table. I will do that when the new ones arrive. All that remains is to sort out the earthing straps in due course.. I have also made up the four clips that hold the table to the floor. The 19 Set has been refurbed for a while
    0 points
  40. That's great Lex, exactly the size nuts I have fitted. (Steve the 23/32" AF equates to the 3/8 Whit spanner size) I could explain but probably confuse you all the more! I just need to get some of those thin washers if anyone has them or making them. Otherwise my mate will have to stoke up the old Myford. Ron
    0 points
  41. The Riker previous owner told me the story of who took possession of the Riker from him, with the idea that he would be able to buy it back should that time ever come. As the story goes, the next owners family had a sell off, which included the Riker, but it moved on to another owner. He didn't know more only that he suggested that the Riker is still in the California coastal area still. He is helpful and if he, or some of his truck buddies, comes up with more current information he will share that information. Interestingly, my hunt for information on Locomobile and Riker trucks has put m
    0 points
  42. Well Al that does sound like some progress in tacking it down. Did the chap give you any leads to the owners who have had her since he did?
    0 points
  43. Now that does look good, well done on a very good job.
    0 points
  44. Evening All, It Took me most of Saturday to find the center of the turret ring on the hull floor and get the slip rig / rotary coupling bolted in place. Today, Sunday, we placed the turret on to the upper hull for the first time, progress me thinks. Then we took the CMP and Morris for a spin in the sun. The next job is to connect the commanders seat support to the rotary coupling. I shall endeavour to put a little more information in the next update. Jon
    0 points
  45. Impressive - nicely done! Andy
    0 points
  46. Been awhile since my last update, but I am still going... Well I gave the equilibrator to a man with a very big hammer, he managed to unscrew it for me. If you look at the picture you can see the washer (top left, a new one is below it) i took out, all 17 plus 2 spacers were rusted together. After seperating them they had little or no play left in them, so ebay and China came to my rescue and new washers were purchased. I cant get 17 + the spacers in and get the casing closed again so I have had to loose the spacers.. Now I just have to get the bottom mounting rewelded and I can
    0 points
  47. The diff casing is now sporting a new set of BSF dentures, the operation went well, although I had to extend the thread on the short ends to match the originals. This has completed stage one of the diff project. The Thorny plates are coming on well, but require careful attention to avoid the paint 'puddling' around the lettering. Stan's experimental engine stand went back under the knife for some modification, to enable the crank case to sit either way up. This was rapidly achieved and the locating holes bored out with a very useful baby mag drill. T
    0 points
  48. Not much of an update, the storage yard has been closed for some new gate posts going in and when I have been able to work on it, all the screws have been badly corroded. so all the floor is now out and the side armour has been removed. I was going to lift the front firewall/bulkhead off as one lump but I realised 1. It was heavy and 2. I would need something that lift quite high. The yard owner is happy to loan me his telehandler but I found some cracks in the windshield supports so decided to play it safe and dismantle the dash and windscreen from the firewall and remove as 2 separate
    0 points
  49. Having briefly subverted the thread with talk of roofing techniques and crane envy (which is perfectly fine with me by the way) it's time for another update on the Karrier. I've marked out and drilled the vertical portions of the rear bonnet support. Whoever produced these new castings did a good job; on the near side one the part number has been reproduced. Lots of careful measuring before committing to the position of these parts on the bulkhead. I'm hoping for a trial fitting of the bulkhead on the chassis next weekend. It wasn't quite in the
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...