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  1. Due to the shortage or perceived shortage I have not been out in my Lwt for a few weeks and did not want to upset the neighbours who need fuel more than me. I did see this which made me smile! I did not have the heart to say its actually a CET
    3 points
  2. Clearly I’ve used up my goodwill allowance today “ I’ll get me coat “
    3 points
  3. Hi Nicked from a Facebook Page By the way not much fuel in the Portsmouth area at the moment Cheers Richard
    2 points
  4. Hi Alfie! Good show! Lex
    1 point
  5. and there you go again in that post implying a conspiracy, we don't think this because of your water beach posts, you are doing it now as well haha
    1 point
  6. @steviem Silicone to put the glass in. Cliff at Universal Jeep Supplies said that the proper rubber seals just trap water in the frame, speeding up the rust. Silicone keeps the water out all together, but you'd need to do the same for the rubber seal on the bottom and outside edge of the frame, or water will just get in there too.
    1 point
  7. Hello Ron, I have a few spare timing gears in my box of engine parts. If you're interested I'll see what I have and send you a picture. One of the sets I have is a slightly different cam shape to the others, although I'm not sure what Royal enfield model they were from. Send me an email if you want me to look them out. Regards, Tom
    1 point
  8. Yes, that's probably what it says, it's incredible that the cards survive at all as Colonel Penny was ordered to destroy them, luckily I got them. All persons that actually worked with these cards have passed away now, but I did try in the past when the good Colonel was still under us to ask him about abreviations and meanings, but he always said, "I'm retired now, and don't want to think about my work anymore" so never got much out of him, the lunches in the Officers mess at the Ayrshire barracks in Mönchengladbach were always good though! Lex
    1 point
  9. Hi Andrew, The reference starting MAR/ probably refers to the RAOC Central Vehicle Depot at Marchington, Staffs. regards, Richard
    1 point
  10. Home straight now! I have been assembling all the bits. firstly by fitting studs.. They were too long! I went back and checked the originals and they are identical so not sure what went wrong there. I took them out, threaded them a bit more and shortened them before fore finally fitting them. Then I got to the end ones and they were too short! They are identical to the originals but then I remembered that two studs had no nuts on them. I have made new ones. And for the top tank. This time, I cut the main gasket first. This is from rubberized cork, as recommended by Steve at CPA radiators. I treated the gaskets with 'Heldite' which had been recommended to me. It is very like the old 'Foliac' jointing and smells pretty bad. Works OK though. Then the water return. This time the studs were too long. I don't know how I managed to make such a mess of them. Oh well. And the filler neck after a bit of Brasso. The core still carries a lot of water stains so I had a go at cleaning it with soapy water and a scrubbing brush. This morning, I fitted the side castings and stuck the gasket down with Heldite. Amazingly, all of the holes lined up. Even more amazingly, the holes lined up in the bottom tank as well and I didn't have to poke a drill through any of them which was most satisfying. Turn it over and on to the top tank. That fitted OK as well so really making progress now. The moment of truth. Will it fit? The answer was no! The radiator tie-rod eye fouled the underside of the bonnet frame. I don't know how I managed that but in the end, just sprung it up and over the top. Spot the deliberate mistake! I fitted the outlet spigot the wrong way up! That was soon sorted and I cleaned and fitted the return pipe and the overflow. The rest of the engine is still filthy but that is a job for another day. The moment of truth! Filled to the brim with water coming out of the overflow but no leaks. Amazing. A whole lorry again! I swung it and it fired on the fifth compression which isn't bad after standing for over a year. I let it idle until everything was hot and no leaks showed themselves. We have a lorry again! Next job is to give it a good service and a thorough clean and out for a test run. Let's hope the weather is nice again next weekend. Steve 😁
    1 point
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  12. We are still doing battle with the wheels. One is still attached to the chassis but Dad has been working on the other. The wheelwright has had a look and stated that this wheel isn't bad but needs new felloes. We need to prepare it and then deliver it to him. Dad has spent a lot of time knocking out bolts. They are an interesting variant of the coach bolt. They are all a boit ropy so Dad has turned up some new ones (9/18" dia, just to be awkward) from some M16 bolts. The brake drum is not very well either. An attack with the wire brush has shown that the surface is too far gone and must either be skimmed or replaced. Fortunately, we have a spare in the collection and some attention with the flap wheel showed it to be serviceable. So, we have to get the old one off. My best find at Beaulieu this year was this pin spanner. Perfect for removing bearing nuts! This wheel still weighs coming on for a couple of hundredweight so we lowered it onto blocks using the chain block. Then we tried to knock the drum off by hitting it between the spokes. Not a hope so out with the propane. Some further knocking cracked the joint and two days of hitting it have moved the drum an inch where it has stuck As neither of us is really up to sustained hammer work, we have given up and are now ordering up the steel to make a puller. Once the drum is off, the wheel can go to the wheelwright. Then we have the next fight which is to get the second wheel off the axle. I shall be glad to see the back of this job! Steve 🙂 Like
    1 point
  13. Undercover Covers seems to get good reviews for their tilts, but I have just come across this alternative supplier based in Oxfordshire who has had good feedback. Might be useful as I understand Undercover Covers has had problems keeping up with the demand and/or staffing? https://www.allwheeltrim.co.uk/homepage.html#Homepage
    1 point
  14. Thank you Barry but you are far too kind. The last few pieces now before reassembling the thing. There is a strange aluminium spacer on the water pipe flange. This was corroded so I put it in the chuck and gave it a skim to clean. The last part was the radiator stay bracket. This is just an eye bolted into the top tank. Unfortunately, the original was just mild steel and broke off so I elected to make a new one from bronze. It was tough old stuff! Drilling bronze is horrible as it grabs the drill as it warms up. I managed to stall the mill with a 3/8" drill before I got through. The end has a nice radius which I machined as a series of flats before cleaning with a file. Unfortunately, I had to use my old mill as the nice new one has expired! Some sort of electrical fault which needs investigation. I wonder if the drilling upset it? Anyway, the result is nice and I made a brass nut to go with it. Reassembly next! Steve 🙂
    1 point
  15. Yes it is very much like the waterbeach saga and as with waterbeach chobham is far from finished ,as for conjecture well I gave out the coordinates for water each to the inch ,if that isn't putting your money where your mouth is I don't know what is ....patience.......
    1 point
  16. Thank you for the comment, but I must stress I do not regard myself as a skilled professional. If these various blogs help and or encourages just one person to have a go it's achieved some small thing. The Historic vehicle media, club rooms and show beer tents are full of commentators noting the lack of young people attracted into restoration and collecting of any shape or form. It's noticeable at shows now that the average age is well above 40 and rising for a large proportion of owners, there are a number of factors that contribute to this which don't need rehashing here. I've spent over 49 years of my life outside of my professional career and large sums of money doing what I do. I was taught by men who are now longer alive. I have in my collection auto engineering books that are now over 80 years old detailing methods and techniques that have not been taught for over 50 years. I'm 64, many of my life long friends and associates in this game who also took time and trouble to teach me are older than me some by a good margin (you know who you are). If we don't start to pass on what little we know then I fear our vehicles will slowly disperse back into the scrapyards from which they originally came. For our collective effort and for what the vehicles represent it has to be worth more than that. The alternative is we sit in our little huddles in the show beer tents and our dark dingy sheds complaining about our various ills and pills struggling with the decision to have that second pint or not if we don't want to be up twice in the middle of night. Then when we can't climb into the cabs any more it'll be off to the crusher with them because nobody cares anymore in this bright new electric era. We are under threat from the vision of a brave clean new world the fewer we become the easier target we make. Phew!! that's all a bit heavy for a Sunday morning sorry chaps must be the pain meds for the bad back, I'm off to the workshop to measure some big ends. Pete
    1 point
  17. Good to see someone taking the time to pass their knowledge on, very impressed, keep up the good work 👍
    1 point
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  19. Excellent work and attention to detail 👍
    1 point
  20. I have a selection of nail guns and sharp chisels, what could possibly go wrong 😬
    1 point
  21. If it’s just slightly weeping try Steel seal, I used some on a gpw block about a year ago and it still seams ok.
    1 point
  22. Love the Arnhem Bridge stand......I wan wun! Ron
    0 points
  23. Hi Ray and Tom, I have a couple here in Holland, but that is probably too difficult, but I can ask a friend near Luton, if his can be viewed if you want? he can also tell you all about it. Any chance of a picture of the glider loading plan? In the meantime a picture of mine, that is on loan to a museum. This is one with original parts recovered from the battlefield mounted on it, and 100% British wartime used. Lex PS, another solution could be to go to Duxford, as they have one on display, but it's a bit strange, as it's hanging from the ceiling!
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  25. Good to see you got some glass cut, I am trying to do the same locally as someone has replaced our door glass with perspex!! We have a 1937 Ford Ten car and the window channel is different to yours, maybe the Fordson range of the time, 7V or E88W etc would be the same?
    0 points
  26. More on the Vickers handcart:- https://vickersmg.blog/2018/01/15/project-complete-irish-handcarts/
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  27. Never seen plastigauge before, simple but affective.
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  28. The 1525 should have the KM engine, basically the same as the IM as in my 1504 only a bit more displacement. Here is a picture of the fan setup, it is an eccentric axle that is also a tensioner for the flat belt. Not sure what you mean with oil pump plunger, but these engines have a gear pump that fills the gallery for the main bearings lubrication and the channels in the sump for the conrod dippers. No dipstick but a cork float with a stick coming out and a contact to stop the engine in case of low oil level. Regards Marcel
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  29. Attention now turns to the big ends. When starting out on a rebuild I like to get an idea of the general mechanical condition of an engine before it's completely stripped down, information gained at this stage will impact on decisions made later regarding the degree of machining and the amount of replacement parts required during the rebuild. So here I'm looking at each big end bearing in turn at this stage I can only see half the bearing surface of both the crank and the bearing but it gives a good indication of the overall condition. First up check to see if the the big end caps have been marked either with factory stamps or punched dots to represent which cylinder they come from (No1 is at the front of the engine). If there are no marks use a sharp center punch and make your own on the side face of the rod and cap while it is still in place and torqued up, don't overdo the punching, on smaller engines you can damage the cap and or rod but paint will not do it will come off during cleaning or machining. On reassembly the right cap must go back on the right rod and the numbers or punch marks must coincide to ensure the cap is the correct way round. You can see here these are factory stamps for No5 big end. Just crack the each cap nut in turn then go back and forth until they are free do not fully undo one side then the other or distortion of the cap may result. Take note of any shims that may have been fitted between the cap faces and rod this is a standard feature on Chevrolet 216 cu in engines for example. OK so here's No5 cap just sitting on top of the vice for the photo it's not in it. Overall there's nothing too terrible here the stripe just above the oil hole is where the crank pin oil passage runs Next some close inspection is called for, I'm looking for scoring, flaking, burning or surface cracking of the shell bearing here. All of which will indicate various forms of ware or failure and can tell you a lot about the operational history of the engine and what ills that may await you elsewhere. That's what's going on here, on close inspection I found tiny steel particles embedded in the white metal shell surface this may indicate poor oil filtration and or maintenance issues in terms of oil change frequency. With the cap off one half of the crank pin can be examined for scoring, burning (which will show up as a blue discoloration) caused by oil film failure. Nothing untoward here, just a slight mark where the crank has sat for a number of years that I rubbed off with my finger nail. Now to get a feel for the ware between the shell bearing and the crank pin and I'm using Plastigauge to measure the clearance. This is not a definitive measurement but it gives a pretty good indication of whats been going on. Final measurements will be taken using micrometer, dial gauge and vernier when all the components have been fully dissembled. If you have not come across Pastigauge before google it, also a very useful aid during reassembly to ensure correct clearance between bearing and crank both for big ends and main bearings (more about those another time). A piece of Plastigauge (that's the thing like a piece of wire in the photo above, it's actually a sort of plastic) is cut to lay across the width of the bearing surface and placed on the crank pin, the cap is replaced and the nuts tightened in sequence back and forth in turn finishing with a torque wrench to set the specified (see your manual) torque on the cap. Now the cap is removed again following the same undoing procedure the Plastigauge will have been squashed out like this (arrow) Using the gauge supplied the gap between the white metal shell bearing and the crank pin can be determined You can see here that this is 0.002". As a rough guide acceptable clearance on shell bearings is given as follows: 0.00075" to 0.0010" per inch of shaft diameter So for a 2" diameter shaft the range would be 0.0015" to 0.0020" so for this particular engine it looks hopeful but the crank pin will be measured accurately when it's removed to confirm that no under size machining has taken place. Last job was to remove the Plastigauge squish with my thumb nail (never use steel tools on machined bearing surfaces) apply a squirt of clean engine oil to the crank pin and shell bearing, put the cap back on repeat the tightening sequence as before and mark the cap with chalk so I know which one I've done and move onto the next rod. In the next update in a couple of weeks time I'll be able to give an update on all the big ends and the main bearing caps and journals too that will enable an assessment of what will be required in terms of work and expenditure on the bottom end of the engine. Pete
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  30. Yes, That is just dreaming after all. In the end some tank, or armored car, or truck, is better than no tank. All depends on some stuff for me, and it wouldn't be for a while no matter what happens! I have spent a considerable amount of time to think about most of that a lot, in particular security/storage and running space. Thanks to the dying industry around me there are actually a fair number of old buildings equipped for working on massive mining equipment - fantastic for heavy vehicles, but of course then those have little to no running space, while all the open land needs a garage or shop built to support equipment like that.. I was at a tank show in Virginia just recently, and I actually had a nice conversation with a former ferret owner who echoed the same sentiment, having realized the costs and problems of tank ownership he settled on a ferret instead. I would likely do similar if needed. But I will enjoy dreaming in the meantime!
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  31. the problem we have in the UK is that the government makes rules, the council takes the rules and applies them as they want to...and they manipulate the truth all the time, they dont actually lie they just suggest that something is what it is or isnt...they are the worst kind of humans and should all be removed from office and the planning system based entirely on fixed criteria with no ambiguity and no back handers...
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  32. Adrian, In view of your comment on the availability of those battle dress tops, I can tell you that the 100th BG didn't arrive until 9th June 1943, so that fits. Incidentally I have never heard of such British made clothing and I am amazed they wore such tat! It does not fit with my wifes belief that they all looked like Richard Gere in Yanks. And Baz, apologies!
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  33. Oh ! GOT-IT now , to take on the Scottish delicacy - 'Square sausage sandwich' .
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  34. Back in the very early 1970's when the MVCG was formed there were a number of us in the 18 to 30 age group who were active members and owners of vehicles. One of the driving forces why Military Vehicle collecting become popular was the fact that a lot of the veteran/vintage vehicles had moved out of our price range. However the WW2 kit had been pensioned off into the scrap yards during the proceeding 10 years. My first jeep was £200 with an MoT, even so it still took a number of years to pay back my Father the money I borrowed to purchase it . There was a good cross section of ages in the club from WW2 vets in there 50's down to long haired Herbert's like me at 16. Good times with life long friendships made and petrol around 40p per/gallon but then I was only earning £4.50 a week. Pete
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  35. Excellent progress again Pete! Good to see you are working on both the Retriever as well as the D15. On 9/25/2021 at 1:27 PM, Pete Ashby said: finding a company who will do this sort of one of work is not easy. I fully agree. Not all campanies are willing to do these one-off jobs. I think it's just too much of a hassle to spend the time that can also be used to do a large, more economic, production run. regards, Alex
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  36. I cannot help with any photos which show ATS girls with personal protection weapons who were DR's but can provide this photo of a member of 137th (Mixed) Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery, with a Sten gun, Belgium, 26 January 1944. So should it be the case that the ATS DR's were armed - they were not alone.
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  37. I've never heard that theory before but either scenario could not end well. Was Martian the only post war recovery to carry a hot spanner?
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  38. With the clutch assemble out of the way the flywheel bolts fixing it to the end of the crankshaft flange were now visible. Those nice clever Dodge Brothers used special studs with a machined flat on the head that locks into the flywheel so you only have to undo the nuts on the other side there are no dowel pins or tapered bolts on this engine. To access the nuts the sump has to come off. Once again crack all the bolts working diagonally first then go around again then remove. Just as with the head if it's stuck don't go wedging a screwdriver into the flange use a block of wood a tap gently to try to brake the seal. Sump removed and you can see the nuts holding the flywheel onto the crank rear flange again just crack each nut in turn moving diagonally around the flange turning the crank to gain access. Here's the rear view you can see the machined flats on the studs, the flywheel face for the clutch friction plate and the gearbox pilot bushing for input shaft all will need to be checked out for spec and condition. The shiny thing lurking in the front of the bell housing is the clutch release bearing I couldn't get the return spring off so waited until the bell housing was removed to do this. The crane makes easy work of lifting out the flywheel, this is a heavy piece of kit with lots of lovely sharp starter ring gear teeth just waiting to trap your fingers in the bottom of the bell housing Last job was to cover up the block with a clean dust sheet it wouldn't go amiss to lay the sump back on if it was going to be left for any time in this condition. That pretty much brings this project up to date, I'll update with progress in a week or so's time. Pete
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  39. Found the first of the two elusive gas bottles, one down one to go !
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  40. It’s just dawned on me that I started this project almost a year to the day 🙈
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  41. The cam shaft sprocket and timing chain has been removed in these two photos leaving the engine front mounting plate behind. The Canadian Chrysler Dodge long block engine has a different front engine mounting arrangement compared to US manufactured 214 short block engine, the Chrysler engine mounts directly to the front frame cross member with two bolts and coil springs. The mounting plate is held in place by a couple of bolts, the countersunk machine screw that can be seen at the front and two small dowel pins. The way I tackle counter sunk machine screws is first to apply heat using the hot air gun, then one short sharp rap with a hammer and punch the right size for the screw head. Then an impact driver with a screwdriver bade that is the right width and length for the screw slot. Lean into it hard and press the trigger just a squirt on tighten then quickly switch to undo if it moves stop. Repeat the heating then give it anther squirt with the impact on tighten then another longer burst on undo and it should spin out. If not you may need to use a spot heat micro butane torch that plumbers seem to like to set fire to houses with, give it some beans but the key is not to mash the head or unfortunately your next tool of choice will be the drill bit and electric drill with much anguish and gnashing of teeth. Front view that's the end of the cam shaft with the three holes that take the drive sprocket the pipe to the right of it is important it's the main oil feed for the timing gear it needs to be removed very carefully. On rebuild it must go back exactly in the same position or the timing chain will not be properly lubricated, Dodge have a pipe some other makes have a small spout both do the same job. At the top of the block you can see the main water channel to the left and if you look closely you may see something just inside the top of the aperture, this is the distribution tube that squirts water at the under side of valve seats and is a feature common to all Dodge engines more about that nest of vipers another time. To the right the round hole for the water pump along with the three fixing holes for the pump body. Photos: front view Side view note where the oil pipe is pointing and how it is formed it can easily get bent out of shape.. more to follow Pete
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  42. With the head off the valves were now accessible and removed, it helps if all adjusters are backed right off. before you try to remove a valve it must be fully closed onto the seat you do this by turning the crankshaft with a socket on the starter dog this in turn turns the cam so that each valve in turn fully closes and can be removed, if you don't do this you will bend the valve stem. There is a special side valve engine valve spring cotter removal tool, the originals are not always easy to find and are expensive my son picked on up recently but it was not cheap. Some of the modern reproductions can be of questionable quality. I don't own one, I have always managed with a good quality Sykes-Pickavant over head valve tool with careful adjustment of the bottom jaws it does the job. I place a thin piece of strip wood over the head of the valve and compress onto that it prevents damaging the head of the valve and stops the tool from slipping around. On this engine the cotters were a bit sticky and a little shy to let go of the spring retainers as a result of standing without oil for so long. A bit of warming from the hot air gun and a dose of WD40 overnight did the trick. None of the valves were stuck in the guides and the stems were clean as a whistle there appears to be no appreciable rock in the guides and neither the valves or the seats in the block appear burnt. The next few posts on this blog will be a bit photo heavy with a bit of accompanying text as I'm going to show the strip down in stages. I've noticed on a number of vintage forums that there are new people coming along who don't yet have the experience or confidence to work on these older engine styles. So if this is useful to anyone who has not done this sort of work before so much the better, most side valve engines of this era are very similar it's just the size and the hanging on bits that are mark specific. For those of you who are accomplished engine builders you may want to skim through the next few posts and just look at the photos or feel free to add your two penny worth if you think it would be helpful and constructive, sometimes there is more than one way to skin a cat. As I keep saying I'm not a professionally trained motor engineer, my skill set lies elsewhere, but I've done a few of these engines over the years. Here are the valves stuck through a reference card as you want to put the same valve back in the same guide that it came from. Each valve will be removed individually, cleaned, inspected then the stems and guides will be measured against the spec for the engine. Yes I know its convention to start No1 from the left, but I'm left handed and can wright backwards OK ? Next job, remove the bottom pulley using the drawing holes and bolts with a hydraulic puller. The hand crank dog and nut will need to be removed on most but not all types of engine. You need to know what type you have. A few dogs are integral with the pulley and a harmonic balancer, trying to undo the dog will result in wrecking the balancer and or the crankshaft . Either way a little warmth from the heat gun and or your freeze spray won't go amiss, an impact gun is a useful tool here. Keep the torch away you don't want excessive heat travelling down the crankshaft and damaging the first main bearing just behind the timing chain. Then the timing chain cover cam sprocket and timing chain can be removed . No dramas here and on first look very little wear, Dodge do not use an automatic timing chain tensioner so the chain and sprockets need to be up to spec or it'll rattle like an old tin can. Front view Side view showing the oil slinger still in place on the crankshaft more to follow Pete
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  43. Its coming along very nicely. My welder has bust just as we started fabricating repairs on the Commer. I have for now ordered a very cheap gasless Mig that has been recomended by a few classic car friends. I thought lets give it a go and see what happens!
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  44. With the pickup under the hoist in the garage it was an easy job to lift the engine and pallet, drive the pickup out of the way then lower away onto a pallet truck. that's what's going on here And here Enough of of all this moving and shifting it was time to get the tools out and start the strip down, the manifolds have been removed previously. To avoid distortion just crack all the fixings studs and or bolts, different manufactures use various combinations of studs and or bolts. Start in the middle and work outwards left and right in turn then go back and repeat the process until all fixings are slack and can be removed. Sounds easy but can be a real pain as the extremes of heat generated by the exhaust can alter the structure of the steel in the stud or bolt and increases corrosion all this adds up to the potential for snapped studs and rounded off bolt heads. Your only friend here is the micro butane torch and or the plumbers freeze spray and easing fluid of choice I use WD40. Having said all that I ended up snapping two studs and having to drill another one out of the manifold....... it happens. First off was the head dodge do not use studs all the head fixings are long shank bolts and they all came out without breaking off in the block. Result !! and a good start. Undoing the bolts or studs on a head you use the tightening sequence from the manual in reverse. Like the manifold removal just crack all the fixings first then go back around several times until they are free and likewise heat and cold and taking your time are your friends here. To physically remove the head some large versions have lifting points so a hoist can be used, most don't, do not try driving a screwdriver or any other form of pry bar between the mating surfaces this will damage both the head and the block mating surfaces possibly beyond repair. Try putting the plugs back in and if it turns over turn the engine over using a socket on the starter dog the compression may free the head if not out with the easing fluid and take your time in extreme cases a number of soft wood wedges can be used tapped in between the mating surfaces but this is a last resort as even this can cause damage. Here's the top face the head is face down on a clean length of scaffold plank, not on the concrete floor. For storage and transport before any remedial work it will have a sheet of ply fixed to the matting surface to keep it flat and supported safe from damage. The block side nothing too drastic here, no sign of a blown head gasket or water leaks it will be cleaned up and taken to the machine shop for a light skim and to check for true. More to follow Pete
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  45. Had the old lady ticking over this afternoon after work, everything nearly dry fitted before bodywork and paint, top bow holes have been filled on one side so I'll need to sort that and not happy with the hood so some work to do there, took her down the road, wonderful feeling driving such a legendary vehicle.
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  46. Busy weekend for Tankering one way and the other, good results all round. First off, Must big up Richard and Charlotte from RCH canvas. After weeks of measuring making and adjusting, we finally got to the end of the canvas that joins the tank and the pump room. It has been a considerable challenge for them, complicated shape, no pattern and nothing to copy from, built completely from scratch. But they were up to it and the finished product looks pretty good. Top section rivetted on Off side And the near side. Unfortunately I ran out of rivets, so couldn't finish the job, but it all fits nicely and should keep the rain out. After that excitement, moved onto another on going saga. Trying to find the "right" shade of red paint for the drain tap tops and the fuel out valve. I've tried various shades, and didn't like any of them, either too dark or too pink or orange. Got a result earlier in the week and finally found a shade that I think looks right. Minor downside is, it is a coach enamel and takes 3 or 4 days to dry, then several weeks to harden off. Next problem, what colour primer to use, as I know this will affect the final colour. A search of the net suggests white, yellow and even blue. Best answer set up a test From left to right, white, yellow, blue, and red. Interesting result here, not much difference in the white yellow and red, but the blue gave an unexpected bonus. The only blue I had, for the test, was some gloss left over from painting the Saltire badge. Painting over gloss is never good as the new coat tends to slide off, but here it only slid off from the lettering making it look like they had been highlighted. Photo doesn't really do it justice, looks really striking in the daylight, but black lettering would be better than blue. So, clean it all the different colours off. Start with a base coat of gloss black, then red over the top hoping it will slide off in the same way. Again, photo doesn't bring the colour out right, looks pink here. This was taken a few minutes after painting and the red is already sliding off the letters quite nicely. Looks really good Fuel valve looks orange, but honestly it is the same red paint as the valve handle On the other hand, it could be pink. Either way it has got a fortnight to dry, as we are off to Yorkshire to visit the in laws. Plan A, when we get back, is full steam ahead with finishing the pump room now that the new canvas will keep the rain out. I'll let you know.
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  47. Two Steps Forward One Step Back!! “ The drivers door “ Now….I am not a religious person but…..” God give me strength “ 🤬🤬 this door is driving me up the wall !! The drivers door is actually far worse than the passenger, it’s basically fubar….but the likelihood of getting a replacement is slim to none. My plan for Saturday was to adjust the hinges and hang the door followed by fitting a new skin…..well that didn’t happen 🤨 I knew the hinges would need a fare amount of fettling to hang the door straight, bearing in mind next to nothing on the cab was original to start with so everything is having to be fabricated to fit individually. After hanging, removing and adjusting the door hinges ( big hammer and vice ) about 50 times it was starting to look right but there was one small tiny problem 🤔 Jump back about a year ago when the cab was being rebuilt This was one of the few sections of cab that didn’t get replaced by me, It had however been repaired by a previous owner, the passenger side was replaced by me as it had rotted away. Jump forward to yesterday and see if you can spot the problem. Was this a school boy error by myself for not spotting or checking an older repair?? I’ll leave you to decide. Having explored all options on how to solve the problem, I even tried to bend the door frame slightly to cope with the curve in the cab but with no success, the only option was soul destroying but had to be done 😩 Block of wood and a hammer !! I’ve now just added on a couple of days more work but the door now opens and closes. And as if destroying the side of the cab wasn’t enough I then slipped with the grinder and a cutting disc and ran it across the top of my thumb 😢 A small amount of blood loss and a lot of swearing, I gave up for the day hopefully I’ll get the door skin fitted next week.
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  48. Only on the front of this magazine Having said that there are other pictures of the same, or similar, arrangements but I believe common consensus is that they were test prototypes and none ever reached front line service. .... Stands back and waits for evidence to the contrary to flood in.
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  49. Whilst on this subject. Here is my Morris with buff coloured canvas (not WW2). I spayed the canvas with a lovely buff coloured Mezowax called Khaki. It was available from R&R in the 90's. but all they sell now is green stuff. I even contacted Mezowax direct some years ago. But they just said there was no call for the buff colour. Does anyone know of an alternative please. It would be handy for faded motorcycle pannier bags and so on. Ron
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