Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/21/2020 in all areas

  1. I have just discovered this thread. My grandfather George Thorpe was chief steward on the HMS Vandyck.I have his account of the bombing and his subsequent internment written in pencil at the time in a very small leather journal.As well as his account it also contains addresses of several men onboard and their wives.It is very interesting as to his take on what happened in the original bombing,and includes dramatic scenes of the struggle at sea to Bleik.If it is of interest to anyone I would be happy to write most of it out verbatim.
    1 point
  2. Richard, that's the fellows. There is a newer looking version as well: I should recognise that 'T' logo on the front, but I can't bring it to mind. I'm so pleased with my detective work I can't resist bragging about it. It was actually you asking for the location and No Signals posting the BFA image number that set me off - and needing diversion from work! Looking at the photo against online mapping, I found the plot of land is between Craigston Rd and Helen St in Govan (a site now occupied by Govan Asda). National Libraries of Scotland have old Glasgow (and other) maps onl
    1 point
  3. 1 point
  4. That is very nice to have. It's the contract plate that was fixed on at the factory which gives the details of the contract that your bike was supplied from so that the military workshops knew the specifications of the machine and which parts lists to refer too. That contract S2956 was for 5000 machines during 1943/4. Ron
    1 point
  5. When they are assembled. I put my finger over the relevant intake oil hole, pull the plunger down and then let it go. If it's a good seal, the vacuum will suck it back up some. Oil the plungers first. There's not much to go wrong with them really. Ron
    1 point
  6. The below is based on the information detailed within the Pat Ware book, and a couple of Key Card details. Contract W.D. No. Engine No. "AFY" Chassis "B" Veh Tech. Type or mark Converted to from Unit to Date Authy Model Notes Contract Date V3019
    1 point
  7. I guess you all want to see it now, but will only show the Flea! Well, Princess Alice is also included! There's not much to see though, the contract plate on the frame tube suggests it's one of the earlier contracts surely. I also added an additional picture from the same series, where the luggage rack can be seen, must have come from a book. Lex
    1 point
  8. Looking good, nice finish.
    1 point
  9. Doc, The karrier has never looked better, it probably never looked as good while in use. The Fairbanks would have admired your efforts. Martin.
    1 point
  10. All are Original photos from my collection. Keith
    1 point
  11. Many automotive manufacturers were using the smaller across flats head sizes before it was adopted in the standards. There is a 1924 Commercial Motor article describing this but I have some evidence it was going on as early as 1906.
    1 point
  12. Of shirts? I have a size 8 shirt from 1948 and it's huge! A size 20 would be listed in the Tents section 😂 Yes that would be for a big girl. But am I getting blouses mixed up with shirts? I'll scan what there is.
    1 point
  13. Part 2. Hasn't all been home workshop, I have managed a couple of visits to the Tanker in between breaks in the rain. First off, attack the pump room light. It didn't go well. Lamp body has a long shaft the goes through the roof with 2 retaining nuts on either side. The lamp body is alluminium, the retaining nuts are brass and pump room roof is steel. Three different types of corrosion combined to ensure the light shaft sheered off rather than undo. Not a major crisis, and reasonably easy to fix. Stripping it down to clean and repair was the next hurdle. It is in two ha
    1 point
  14. So it is. I didnt notice that. I googled "Frouth" and the closest match it came up with was "frothy urine". Draw your own conclusions........
    1 point
  15. From the auctioneer's blurb: "Curiously, the Data Summary does not mention the engine, which was the 2.2-litre petrol unit, as seen in this example." Nope someone just wasn't bright enough to turn the page over of the Data Summary !
    1 point
  16. Story ofmy life Richard.Its the age youknow. 😃
    1 point
  17. Don't think that Santa is the only one with problems .......your link does not work!
    1 point
  18. Dear Doc, I am related to the Fairbanks, my grandmother was sister to James Fairbank. As a child I played on the Karrier. My great-uncle bought lots of post-war surplus, including empty sea-mines, used as waterbutts. They had some glider carriers, which went to Eden camp museum. There is nothing left now. The connection to Bradford is that was where the family originate from, James Fairbank's father, James Arthur Fairbank was a mill and coal mine owner, and upon moving out of the business, moved to Appleton-le-Street. The Karrier may have been owned by a relative or bought in Bradfor
    1 point
  19. You should try a hobbyist or a college with those techniques. At the university they were happy to make a part for my friends antique grammophone. Otherwise they were printing dinosaurs and stupid things like that.
    1 point
  20. Robert, Are you saying that there were no War Office Fords that started production before or after 1940 ? If your interpretation were correct there would be W9T and W1T, W2T etc plus the equivalent WxA and WxC designations. David
    0 points
  21. I don't know how people are feeling right now, not able to get out and about. So with time on my hands and to help keep peoples spirits up, I have decided to share some pictures of the restoration of David's workshop body. This first batch of photographs documents the dismantling of the remains. These first two photographs show the body arriving home July 2017. We had spent a day on site bracing the structure to make it fit for the journey. The tarpaulin was an added precaution; we didn't want to risk pieces of rotten timber being blown off, especially on the motorway.
    0 points
  22. Little progress of late because of the "Lockdown" where the team has not been able to get together for some weeks. So much was planned to be done over the Christmas and New Year break which came to nought - but Steve has completed the Dennis Radiator patterns at his home whilst Tim has continued with his writing - several articles completed for various magazines and lodged with them for publication. Tony managed to remove 18 of the rusty 21 Coach Bolts securing the Brake Drum to one back wheel and now awaits some help to finish the job. He has also stripped down and cleaned the brackets to hol
    0 points
  23. A distant family member, whose precise relationship to me I don't recall, was fatally injured in the 1930s by being struck by a Motor Omnibus. It was of no great consequence, as he was, as my Grandmother ruefully described him, "a reader of cheap fiction". Such affectations were of great consequence in those days. There is one thing I am certain about though. I would like to think that the fatal Omnibus carried fittings made or sold by Thomas Tingley, Coach and Motor Body Builders, of Walworth, London. This Thomas Tingley catalogue popped up on ebay last week for four quid. I
    0 points
  24. Today I removed the rear axle off the old frame. I now need to slot it into a small gap for storage. I fitted a piece of rear armour on the M16 and got some measurements so I can order some steel. I then went on to remove some damage parts to see what I could do. The rear right light bracket and surround were quite mangled and I was nearly committed to buying repro from the US. So with nothing to lose I decided to have a crack at it. Typically my gas ran out just as I was trying to finish up. I can’t complain though as I’ve had the bottle for about 12 years!
    0 points
  25. Remember when lock-downs were still a novelty? Well, back in March 2020 this rather delightful little beauty appeared on our favourite on-line auction site. In response to the "Make and Offer" option an offer was made, which was promptly refused. The drill was subsequently bought second bid. A forum stalwart kindly took delivery and when free movement was once again possible (which now seems a distant memory) it made its way up country to Oxfordshire. Finally, after the 2nd lock-down was over, we were able to collect it. So we have a Silver Manufacturing Co. Advance No. 12 dri
    0 points
  26. Yes it is, been using it for years. Can brush it, or thin it with about 25% standard thinners and spray on. Touch dry in about half an hour. Sticks to anything Red colour does tend to bleed through green top coat, so I usually do a grey primer over it first to seal it Certainly seems to keep the tin worm at bay
    0 points
  27. As you realise clothing is not my speciality, but I do appreciate primary sources are so much more valuable than an opinion found by googling! Although this is as REME document it outlines Government policy and how it was to be implemented by the MOD.
    0 points
  28. I certainly couldn't use my saddle as a reference Rik. But Steve's, probable original and Andrews definite original with rotten bungies still attached are good enough for me. Plus I really should have at least one bungie saddle in the shed! 🙂 Ron
    0 points
  29. Nice 8.8cm found you at last
    0 points
  30. With a flat head V8 it puts it in the Ford GS stable
    0 points
  31. Hi Steve, From your photo it looks like the gills are slightly crimped, you might be interested in the attached link to a Youtube video of a fairly simple set up to wind strip metal on to a tube using a lathe. regards, Richard
    0 points
  32. I have little understanding of uniforms & of their various types. But suffice it to say that the types of shirts of interest in this thread are not included in the catalogues I have. In fact shirts only occupy 2 pages yet trousers & trews fill 15 pages. Of the shirts covered, sizing is based purely on collar size & although they are all NATO codified, the sizes are in inches or centimetres, they have not yet been NATO sized. By way of interest to the clothing enthusiasts following the thread here are some old numerical sizes derived from imperial measurements, that are ag
    0 points
  33. My wife Margaret stayed at home. I went to the summer house for my parents. It will air out by spring. 🤣 Pawel
    0 points
  34. You do have some nice landscapes in the UK. Her its mainly flat country.
    0 points
  35. Hi Dave, Thanks for that, the original nuts and bolts on 2393 (1915) are almost all of the later 'post war' style, ie, one spanner size smaller, with slightly longer hex and single chamfers. This came as a bit of a surprise to me, as I always thought pre and post war in this instance referred to WW2. It seems clear that there was a similar economy measure in WW1 also.
    0 points
  36. I have started a conversation with a very knowledgeable solder dipper. He stated that for early radiators the tubes were usually solder tinned so the gills could be threaded on with flux; the assembly was then put in an oven where the solder would fix all the gills to tubes. With that information in place it explains why virtually no solder is visible on the gills of my 1908 Singer radiator. This radiator is the closest in construction (horizontal tube) and age (1908) that I know of. Dipping the whole tube would offer better corrosion protection.
    0 points
  37. I can't answer your question about sizes of shirts, but as for the rest the answer is "fashion". It became very popular to blouse the combat jacket by tying the bottom drawcord tightish at the waist and then pulling the skirt down. This resulted in the skirt pockets being folded in two and, if a belt were worn, its being round them making using the pockets impossible. At the same time it bulked out the upper part of the jacket making it look a bit like a battledress blouse. It was a very popular thing to do for a while, but, to me, never made any sense and I didn't copy it. The hood
    0 points
  38. Hi all just an update, finally got my engine from an arizona liberty owner for my 2nd chassis, engine is a aeries two continental and is fairly complete many thanks to william in virginia for making this happen and chuck in arizona too, williams also supplying me with a missing m3 carb and a spare radiator he has, i had put a deposit down on this engine around feb this year then with covid and other issues it has only recently moved the first step before coming back down here, still progress forward, ive also almost got the repairs done on the chassis, added some pics below mike
    0 points
  39. Et voilà. MOËT et CHANDON, Epernay, France 1900. Happy Christmas! Adrian
    0 points
  40. I do like a drop of MOET merry christmas
    0 points
  41. Not only Frouth but Moet & Handon and also Moet & Qandon. I can understand some letters being in the wrong order as the ‘Type Setters’ worked back to front, but to miss a letter (or perhaps it was damaged) and an incorrect letter (a Q rather than a C) is quite bad. Then again you would think they would have printed a ‘Proof’ before printing in their thousands.
    0 points
  42. Hi Al, I can get back to 1906 (Columbia Spectator). and 1905 (Life Magazine). The importer then was Geo. A. Kessler &C° of New York. I may be able to get back further, but I need to get on with some Christmas Shopping this morning (-: Best Regards, Adrian
    0 points
  43. Hi everybody just took delivery of this bedford QLT. I am going to restore it back to its former glory. Was hopeing someone might be able help me out with a fee questions? i have a copy of the key card which informs me its from the contract V4914 with a war department number of L559757. As you can see it has a different WD on the doors L4819720 can anyone shed some light on this? Will need some new tyres anyone know where i can get some?
    0 points
  44. The idler posts are an absolute ball ache so I’ve been leaving them for now and just soaking with oil. I tackled the bogies next. To remove the bogies I needed to have the track on stands. I got some medium height stands from the net and they are more than man enough for the job. To stop the volute springs extending as I lifted the track up, I used a ratchet strap to retain the crab and bogies in position. I then removed the 16 nuts from the assembly while there was weight on them. With the bogies off the ground, it was time to fit the spring compressors and retract the cr
    0 points
  45. I have almost completed my WD pattern panniers for the Triumph 3HW, just the leather corners and snap caps to fit and I am quite chuffed with the way they have come out. The material I used is authentic wartime dated canvas, that came from a 1940 bell tent, which sadly didn't make it into preservation due to severe damage on a couple of sections. I have got a couple of other items to make for the bike, which will be pure BS, but since when have we been worried about over dressing MVs
    0 points
  46. 0 points
  47. my dad is the was the owner of that from 1999 -2009 the numbers match up and everything that we done matces it really looks sad for its self so please do get in touch with us so we can talk about where the poor old girl traveled
    0 points
  48. Hi Rick, I didn't manage to get this radiator because they decided not to sell it, but a good mate has just found another which is in far better condition apart from a small section of the left side mounting bracket having an inch or so cut off the end!! now all I am needing is a set of mag/throttle controls- bracket and levers, and also the correct handbrake lever for this Albion to be a complete project, so if anyone can help with these let me know, even recast examples would be ok, I have lots of parts for other early English makes so maybe someone here would be happy to trade for t
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...