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  1. Robert with the deepest of respect take a deep breath and go and sit in the shade old friend Best regards Pete
    2 points
  2. Guys, Yes, I regularly correspond with Mike Starmer and we both agree that seeing a colour photo of a British & Commonwealth Army truck or non-armoured type from WW2 is very rare and often corrupted by the type of colour film but here are some from my collection showing the early G3 / G4 scheme used before SCC.2; This line up of the first Canadian troops to be posted to the UK and I believe they date from 1940. Most of the Canadian CMPs are equipped with CMP 11 Cabs and Bedford & Morris vehicles with aero screens etc Last is an ambulance which I can only guess is in SSC.2 from an unknown date, that shows SCC.2 was mostly brown with a touch of green to it. It was a gift from the Canadian Red Cross.
    2 points
  3. Hi Ted, thanks for the pics. Unfortunately it has the model B 4 cylinder engine. 4 tons and 52 BHP is not an ideal driving experience (apart from economy). I’ve had a shot of the V8 engined heavy unit (the late Mick Paul’s) when I took a trip down to Cannock in 1993 (drove the 7V all the way down there and back!). ATB Peter
    1 point
  4. German lawyers wrangle over pensioner's WW2 tank in basement - BBC News
    1 point
  5. I used some of that sealant on the fuel tank of my Austin 7, some 20years ago. After having repaired a single hole with some epoxy. Its still going strong 21 years later.
    1 point
  6. 1 point
  7. Been watching this with great interest. Don't understand even half of it - but love it none the less. Especially with the muppet gif - I saw this on another forum.
    1 point
  8. Hi Mike, I have gone through the rest in some detail now. Comments are: 1. An excellent technical description of the gun and its production variants. Well laid out and well illustrated. 2. A detailed description of the production history of the gun, trailer and ammo, including the contractors and sub contractors. I found this especially interesting, as I am keen on industrial history amongst other things. My own research has not drilled down to the same levels, so I was pleased to see references to the subcontractors' trades and products. It certainly filled in a few gaps in my knowledge 3. Good summary of operational history and salient examples without trying to be a full regimental history. Generally tells us what the regimental issues were where the guns were used. 4. Great narrative stringing all of the production, design, trials and operational info together , as well as the personalities involved. Makes a potentially dry list of facts come alive into an interesting read. (BAMs interaction with Kirby a case in point. Kirby was rather preoccupied with aircraft engine production, so he was drinking through the proverbial fire hose for other war effort projects. Still, his taking on the 25 Pr recuperator was something he should have avoided with hindsight). 5. In 239 pages, info is densely packed and covers every conceivable angle of 25Pr from artillery to tank use. Good value for money IMHO. 6. Comprehensive referencing and end notes. A readable book for anyone interested in the subject, with academic rigor. I like the publications list 😉 7. On arcane points, I was uncertain as to why Ruwolts marked the saddle data plate No.11 Mark. 1, for what should have been marked No.2 Mk.I, (was there a No.11 saddle I didn't know about?) but I was pleasantly surprised that you covered that point. As you say, the standard way of marking is to have model Number (No.) in Hindu-Arabic, and Mark (Mk.) number in Roman numerals. This was done by GMH and everyone else in the British arsenal system. I agree that Ruwolts have intended to use Roman numerals (II) where they should have used a '2', but on short 25 Reg. A8, Ruwolts they have been cheeky and used a '1' instead of a 'I' stamp. Maybe it allowed Charles Ruwolt to economise on stamps! Glad I've cleared that up now.... 8. One of my own projects, now I am in semi-retirement, is to republish my book on Australian manufacturers' codes. That gives the actual makers code marks stamped on the components / ordnance for most of the government factories and contractors you mention. Overall Mike, thanks for writing this book for us artillery aficionados, it is a cracker. I cannot see anyone being bothered to write another book on the subject, as there would be little extra to write about unless they went to the same level of detail on UK and Canadian production. That said, I think your book would cover off on that to the satisfaction of the vast majority of the readership. All the best, and good luck with it, I am sure it will be very successful. Damien
    1 point
  9. yes only early jeeps had the spring the screw hole for the lock plate was left open also the data plates were screwed on with a pressed type nut you can get them i think jeeparts have them
    1 point
  10. THE information was complied from first the number two key cards and contract records and chilwell lists held at the former MUSEUM OF ARMY TRANSPORT and members of the AEC society . The question of service history is one of the most asked by owners of vehicles of the world war two period unless you can find a picture of it in service the answer is unlikely
    1 point
  11. 88 YY 54 HAD the census number of H 4I33563 CONTRACT v3501 was for 623 Matadors had census numbers of H 4133317 TO H 4133939
    1 point
  12. late jeeps had a much higher catch witch did away with the lock plate
    1 point
  13. just spread the legs out a bit so you do not need to drill extra holes that's what i do
    1 point
  14. Thanks for all your help and advice. I will always make sure I carry plenty of water to try and cool things down. Maybe we should all park our military vehicles up through the summer and only take them out when its snowing!
    1 point
  15. Insulate the fuel line, make sure you have the heat shield in place above the pump. I have idly wondered if reproducing the heat shield in stainless may not make it work a bit better than the original mild steel.
    1 point
  16. It could be a good idea to pressure test the fuel line, a friend of mine had exactly the same symptoms on his Dodge, after overhauling the fuel pump to no avail he fitted an electric fuel pump. When he turned the ignition on a very fine jet of petrol shot out of the fuel pipe, the hole was so small it was virtually impossible to see. After replacing the fuel pipe and removing the electric pump it still runs fine.
    1 point
  17. Keith, don't use copper for the fuel pipes as they absorb heat, used steel pipes and if any pipes are in the vicinity of the exhaust manifold used an insulating lagging material. Years ago I did this on my Bedford with asbestos string obtained from a hardware shop in deepest Normandy, it did the trick.
    1 point
  18. And the crane manufacturers are Les Ateliers de Bondy, Seine, who seem to have produced quite a range of machinery, much of it self-propelled. No idea on the chassis, though.
    1 point
  19. It's a firm from Arras Travaux Publics ?????? & Fils.
    1 point
  20. Please, please tell me that the logbook has survived? I always find id rather sad when you have to go down the route of age related plate but....there is a chance; KENTKent History & Library Centre, James Whatman Way, Maidstone, ME14 1LQ (03000 41 31 31) Email: archives@kent.gov.uk Open Monday to Saturday.Registers 1904-1974 (Note KN 4488-92 are omitted from the KN register). GIM register D-G 1-1199; HMC registers 1905-20; TP registers (KT and KE) 1923-34; Registers of imported vehicles. Many of the old archive records are in a word CRAP! One of my bikes which luckily was known to the DVLA still retained the original 20's logbook but Dad bought it because we were looking for a vintage bike with a local number. When I approached the records office (it is shown that they have these registers) we were told that they had been lost in a fire so instead I was send a copy from the cancelation book....our bike is in it; taken off the road in 1935. All it shows is reg number, type of vehicle and who had it. Later records from the three letter sequence that survive include the date but zilch about what the vehicle is! Anyone wishing to try and trace a registration mark head here; Kithead Trust | Educational charity set up to collect and preserve material from the transport industries who have a complete list of what survives and where.
    1 point
  21. fit under the grill other wise the fitting bolts will damage the hood
    1 point
  22. no..... you might have to cut the square part back as the repro light bolts are to long
    1 point
  23. Excellent workmanship 👍👍
    1 point
  24. You've earn't more than tea and biscuits! It looks superb, the work is such good quality. No matter how long it takes, it is preserved and will be a real show stopper.
    1 point
  25. It will be fine, no problem, just get it up to the mark before driving it. I wouldn't discard the new oil you drained out either, I'd put it in clear containers and let any dirt or water settle out a couple of times then just use it for topping up.
    1 point
  26. Came across this on a F/B page, no idea as to its provenance but thought it might interest some of you guys, if only in comparison to the paint job done by Tomo!
    1 point
  27. Fantastic work Pete.
    1 point
  28. Hello Sir, Don't know about that Phil, She's coming together slowly. We were worried about sandblasting the gearbox, steering box and transfercase incase the sand damaged the oilseals or sand got inside any of the casings, so thats why we used the wire wheel which seems to take forever ! Hopefully all the primered parts will be olive drab by Sunday.
    1 point
  29. As Gordon says above treat it as a three speed box with additional crawler gear in first. Many years ago now I did a conversion for a customer on a Carryall where he wanted a higher road speed so he provided a set of power wagon difs with higher ratio than the war time WC ones. It completely changed the characteristics of the truck using first was now a necessity at junctions lights and roundabouts and as you have found 1st to 2nd is a long pull without much road speed to keep the truck moving. However it added about 10 mph to the cursing speed in top but was a night mare on hills as it ran out of puff in top very quickly and then it was foot to the floor in 3rd all the way up hovering over the stick waiting to pull second on occasions something on a stock WC that is only required when climbing a mountain.. The foot note to this is the customer was very happy with the result as he was moving to the Fenlands no hills and long flat roads. Pete
    1 point
  30. Oh my, you are using first gear? First should be reserved for setting off uphill, with a full load, or towing a trailer. Think of it as a three-speed box with an additional granny gear. Starting in second should be fine, the number of changes is greatly reduced and that will help make up for any extra effort. Additionally, only ever select first or reverse when completely stationary, unless you like working on gearboxes.
    1 point
  31. Firstly sorry hear of your Fathers passing but well done you for taking the truck on, so many get sold on by family in double quick time these days. To address your question, the numbers you quote sound just fine for an engine with some miles on it Gordon's advice is worth following perhaps before the winter lay up. Otherwise enjoy the rare truck you now own drive it with the respect that a vehicle of it's age requires and it will last a life time. Pete
    1 point
  32. As I mentioned up thread that's fine for a worn engine. As I understand it the oil pressure gauge just shows you the pressure at the main bearings, the big ends are too far 'down' the supply line to reflect on the gauge. Drive it cautiously and enjoy it. If it hasn't been driven much, then modern detergent oil is liable to flush a pile of crap out of the interior the engine, and some of that can get in important places. You have cleaned the sump which will have got rid of much of it, but now and again it would still be worth warming it up then draining the oil to let it settle in a pan, then pouring the clean oil back in. If any substantial amount of dirt settles out, change the filter then repeat the process after some more use.
    1 point
  33. Part of EMER GENERAL N 800 EMER GEN N 800.pdf
    1 point
  34. As always there are lots of different views on what owners should or should not do with their vehicles. It's a shame that as a community we can't agree that the preservation of vehicles is the key objective, what colour they are and how they are displayed is secondary. While I might prefer originality, if the choice is to ensure a vehicle survives or is lost/scrapped because an owner won't compromise on originality then, in my own opinion, survival wins. The other aspect I find upsets me is the language used. Having a healthy debate about areas that are subjective or where the information isn't readily available is good. Proffering information in a constructive and helpful way is great. Use of language such as 'disappointing' (we all know what a British persons means when they use that phrase), "vague resemblance' is scant praise and 'better research' is all very negative and while it may not be intended to offend it's not the sort of language that will build bridges. So thank you to all those who are spending their time, money and effort to preserve our history, whatever paint is used on the end result. Regards, Julian
    1 point
  35. Recently did a little experiment on E5 petrol, added 600ml of water to 4 litres of petrol, I extracted the 600ml of water out and another 600ml of Ethanol. It can be got out just takes a lot of effort. Have yet to find out the effect on the engine. Diana
    1 point
  36. Hi All When US went over to E10 gas years ago it had a dramatic and problematic impact on MVs. In as little as one tank full, fuel pumps failed, flexible fuel lines leaked or swollen to the extent they didn't pass fuel, gas cans started leaking around the caps. The first couple parades that year it was not uncommon to have a truck fail, often the story went like this, "well I filled the tank this morning on the way to the parade". The thing noticed was the drop in power and fuel mileage. Once people, in our MV Club figured out what was going on, it was a race find the actual ethonal resistant Gates hose. Fuel pumps were more problematic. Good luck on the change over. Cheers Phil
    1 point
  37. I already use an additive in my fuel to combat the effects of ethanol. More cost, though!
    1 point
  38. "I've got a brand new combine harvester, and I'll give you the key ..." 🙂 Andy
    1 point
  39. An electric tank is the way ahead for the future 😂😂😂😂, electric tractors ploughing fields and electric combine harvesters 😂😂
    1 point
  40. Last summer, inspired by various posts on this forum, I thought that I would have a go at cleaning out the Karrier petrol tank. Molasses were bought from the local country store and diluted down. The wasps were fascinated by the whole affair. After several weeks in the tank, which was periodically rolled from side to side, the festering brew was drained into pails. It's true to say that I was less than impressed with the results. Another forum regular (Mr Pittock) had mentioned having tanks acid washed so I thought I would give that a go. The tank was delivered at the beginning of June (just before I returned to Bristol) and was ready for collection by the middle of July. I had said that I wasn't in any particular hurry for it. Well, what a transformation! So I'm back in Suffolk for a few days and have sealed the inside of the tank with "slosh". My godfathers, that's got expensive! But now the eco warriors are adulterating our petrol with ethanol, you can't be too careful. After it's little adventure the tank was not looking its best, so a bit of a sand and a repaint was required. Meanwhile, at the other end of the paint shop: Leyland bonnet. I didn't know David could move so quickly as when I pointed the camera in his direction. In other news I've refitted the front mudguards and started painting the top surfaces.
    0 points
  41. Had a mad day on the Foden today. Finished reassembling the front end and reconnecting the lights. Had to re rivit one of the rivinuts on the front vent as it was spinning. Cleaned up the indicator lenses which had been partially camouflaged. Used the remnants of a headlight restorer kit with good results. Spent far longer than anticipated getting the washer jets operating. Crud in the reservoir and pipes kept blocking the washer jets. Took a good hour to get the system cleaned out and functioning. I think a filter may be a worthwhile addition. The additional reflectors were fitted. More loose bits were restrained. Decided to strip and service the gear lever range change valve. As the gaiter needed replacing it seemed like a good idea. I somehow forgot to take any pictures though! Suffice to say it's quite simple inside just a close fitting disc with slots to align with the various ports. They operate in pairs so I assume both cylinders on the gearbox operate together. It was all a bit dry inside but easily serviced. Polishe'd the mating surfaces, lightly lubricated everything and reassembled. New gaiter installed. And the old one. Hopefully a bit of test driving tomorrow.
    0 points
  42. When I fitted the heat shield, I did look for signs of arcing but the terminal was quite clean. I wonder if it is something to do with the modern volatile fuels? If we had been running lean, I would have expected the engine to boil up as well but it all ran very well. A bit of a puzzle but one for Tomo to look out for. Steve 🙂
    0 points
  43. Stan has sent some hi -def pics of the finished mag shaft. I managed to find the spacer plate that came with the mag and adjusted the foot plate to suit, so it's all lined up and ready to go. Obviously we could have attached the brass pinion directly to the shaft and adjusted the timing with the vernier coupling, but we went the extra mile and utilized the annular thread, which was the original means of adjustment. The result is a satisfactory compromise, which gives us the best of both systems and allows the use of the impulse coupling to provide easier starting.
    0 points
  44. So now we have lawyers on the case...they EHDC have just announced another old farm is going to be developed into 1500 homes...thats well over 50 acres and my little two acre museum cant go ahead because it will be harmful to the countryside even though the field has no agricultural value whatsoever and yet the 1500 homes less than a mile away on excellent pasture land is not harmful...its no wonder this country is fucked...its full of people who literally control everything to their own plans and if your don't fit then bugger off...and this idiot government has given them the powers to do so...in ALton w have nothing but thousands of new homes...no business no leisure opportunities nothing, my museum would bring much need interest and leisure activities, a nice coffee shop and restaurant a place for mums to hang out a kiddies play area, it would help children with their GCSE exams where the cold war is now and official subject...the museum has many plusses and the negatives, its not in keeping with the countryside, a container park next door literally, 1500 homes less than a mile away, another 1000 homes 500 yards away...its just plain sick...
    0 points
  45. Welcome to the forum, lots of great advice and folks here. Its always great when people ask a question and post the result when its fixed for the next person to benefit from. Greeat stuff, enjoy
    0 points
  46. To make them identifiable as +ve or -ve .and less likely to be mixed up. That is what I was told when I did a Plant course at Chatham back in 1978
    0 points
  47. These were the directions. You heated the entire time? Instructions Preparation - Store and use at room temperature (73°F/23°C). Material has a limited shelf life and should be used as soon as possible. Wear safety glasses, long sleeves and rubber gloves to minimize contamination risk. Good ventilation (room size) is necessary. Some Materials Must Be Sealed - To prevent adhesion between the rubber and model surface, models made of porous materials (gypsum plasters, concrete, wood, stone, etc.) must be sealed prior to applying a release agent. Sonite Wax™ (available from Smooth-On) is suitable for sealing porous surfaces. Apply two thin layers of wax and let dry. A high quality Shellac is suitable for sealing modeling clays that contain sulfur or moisture (water based). Thermoplastics (polystyrene) must also be sealed with shellac or PVA. In all cases, the sealing agent should be applied and allowed to completely dry prior to applying a release agent. Non-Porous Surfaces - Metal, glass, hard plastics, sulfur free clays, etc. require only a release agent. Applying A Release Agent - A release agent is necessary to facilitate demolding when casting into or over most surfaces. Use a release agent made specifically for mold making (Universal™ Mold Release available from Smooth-On). A liberal coat of release agent should be applied onto all surfaces that will contact the rubber. IMPORTANT: To ensure thorough coverage, lightly brush the release agent with a soft brush over all surfaces of the model. Follow with a light mist coating and let the release agent dry for 30 minutes. Because no two applications are quite the same, a small test application to determine suitability for your project is recommended if performance of this material is in question. IMPORTANT: Shelf life of product is drastically reduced after opening. Immediately replacing the lids on both containers after dispensing product will prolong the shelf life of the unused product. XTEND-IT™ Dry Gas Blanket (available from Smooth-On) will significantly prolong the shelf life of unused liquid urethane products. MEASURING & MIXING - Liquid urethanes are moisture sensitive and will absorb atmospheric moisture. Mixing tools and containers should be clean and made of metal, glass or plastic. Materials should be stored and used in a warm environment (73°F/23°C). IMPORTANT: Pre Mix the Part B before using. After dispensing proper amounts of Parts A and B into mixing container, mix thoroughly for at least 3 minutes making sure that you scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing container several times. If Mixing Large Quantities (24 lbs./10.88 kgs. or more) at one time, use a mechanical mixer (i.e. Squirrel Mixer or equal) for 3 minutes followed by careful hand mixing for one minute as directed above. Then, pour entire quantity into a new, clean mixing container and do it all over again. Although this product is formulated to minimize air bubbles in your the cured rubber, vacuum degassing will further reduce entrapped air. A pressure casting technique using a pressure chamber can yield totally bubble free castings. Contact Smooth-On or your distributor for information about vacuum degassing or pressure casting. Pouring - For best results, pour your mixture in a single spot at the lowest point of the containment field. Let the rubber seek its level up and over the model. A uniform flow will help minimize entrapped air. The liquid rubber should level off at least 1/2” (1.3 cm) over the highest point of the model surface. Curing - Allow rubber to cure for at least 48 hours at room temperature (73°F/23°C) before demolding. Do not cure rubber where temperature is less than 65°F/18°C. Post Curing - After rubber has cured at room temperature, heating the rubber to 150°F (65°C) for 4 to 8 hours will increase physical properties and performance. Using The Mold - If using as a mold material, a release agent should be applied to the mold before each casting. The type of release agent to use depends on the material being cast. The proper release agent for wax, liquid rubber or thermosetting materials (i.e. Smooth-On liquid plastics) is a spray release made specifically for mold making (available from Smooth-On or your distributor. Prior to casting gypsum plaster materials, sponge the mold with a soap solution for better plaster flow and easy release. In & Out™ II Water Based Release Concentrate (available from Smooth-On) is recommended for releasing abrasive materials like concrete. Performance & Storage - Fully cured rubber is tough, durable and will perform if properly used and stored. The physical life of the rubber depends on how you use it. Contact Smooth-On directly with questions about this material relative to your application.
    0 points
  48. You are very kind Barry. I have just returned home from Devon where I saw the castings for the first time and have brought them back for machining. I must say that I am very pleased with them. It took Ben, at the Bridport Foundry, a whole day to make the moulds but his efforts were worth it. I have just put the patterns on the shelf ready for the next time someone does a Dennis Subsidy lorry! Steve 🙂
    0 points
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