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  1. What, like all those GMCs registered as 1939 in the 1980s? 😉
    3 points
  2. Spare wheel fitting. This has been an on going mission for some time, and it has turned into a complete saga worthy of a telling by the great Bernhard Cribbins on Jackanory, except he would have to read it after the watershed time so as not to give the kids nightmares. It started last winter when son Stuart and I set out to fit the recently reconditioned carrier parts back on. All seemed to go well except we ran out of the right size bolts and had to leave a couple of bits off. We also left off some of the cross bracing to allow access to the air intake pipes and compressor condenser u
    3 points
  3. I personally don't have a problem with replicas as long as they are not portrayed as originals. I think that anyone who puts the effort into restoring anything is worthy of praise, the only exception, in my mind, are those who pay to have the work done and the then tell everyone that they restored the item themselves, why not just be honest. As for not using the correct thickness of steel, sometimes there seems to be little point, unless it can be seen and the in a lot of cases it can be packed out to look correct if you are using thinner material or ground back, if it is slightly
    2 points
  4. You are too kind, Ed. We only do it for the fun of it and the friends we make around the world. Steve
    2 points
  5. It was a French scrapyard that the previous Dutch collector bought it from. I had it shipped here on a Dutch trailer with an English tractor unit and a Polish driver. A truly European effort.
    2 points
  6. I expect Lex can sell you one Andrew......For about 1 1/2 times the value of your G3😏 Bloody expensive door stops. Ron
    2 points
  7. It maybe, I’m not totally sure which order they run in. Maybe the transfer one was an interim before the embossed. it looks good but it would be good if someone who has bought one could comment.
    1 point
  8. There is a take-off one on ebay UK for sale btw. The seller always has interesting stuff for sale but asks way too much imo. https://www.ebay.nl/itm/303718813031
    1 point
  9. Are you aware (if you’re trying to keep factory condition) that’s there’s different versions? 1st were pancake style, then I think it was plain in the style you posted, then an embossed plate spot welded to the can and then I think a transfer type. If you’re aiming for a specific production date then this one may not be correct.
    1 point
  10. Never let it be said that we would ever do anything remotely illegal Lex! Ron
    1 point
  11. Thanks for taking the time to change all the links to your pictures. Without them it's just not the same.
    1 point
  12. It being a Tuesday evening, it was clearly time for Monday Club! Monday club has many rules and purposes, some confoundingly complex. Firstly it is generally held on any evening except a Monday (sic). Thirdly some work has to be accomplished to achieve the second objective, of enhancing shareholder value of Britains' finest brewers. Hurrah for brewers. This weeks task was to finish making the rear axle more manoeuvrable by constructing a trolley, remove the remaining spring and take off the propeller shaft tube. We also decided to weigh the spring and axle for sporting purposes.
    1 point
  13. This is why mine is going to Jerry
    1 point
  14. Should clean up nicely with a bit of light oil.
    1 point
  15. It looks superb, what a great finish. Very much worth the effort.
    1 point
  16. It is true. Sorry. I would love to have some Pierce Arrows, but the wife said "You buy one more old truck and you will never see me and the kids again"! ......................... How much did you say they were?
    1 point
  17. Absolutely stunning - a lovely job. Good luck with the registration process and road testing 1068
    1 point
  18. These last three postings made me laugh again! Tony
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. Our museum recently acquired this 1912? Commer car open chain drive truck. I have got it running not too bad. It starts easily. Don't know what magneto it would have had originally but has an American Boch on it now Which works good. It has dual spark plugs. I thought it probably originallyhad battery and buzz coil for starting then switched to the magneto. It has a bennett carburetor which I think is original but not sure. I can't find any info on this truck other then the odd photo .the engine is a head en block which is a little unusual but not unheard of.
    1 point
  21. That is very clever. Well done.
    1 point
  22. Now....the truck question of Packard, Pierce Arrow, Peerless, and Locomobile ..........The war had a great effect on all the companies.......some positive, and much more negative. First thing to remember is all the previous companies listed were VERY high end automobile manufactures..........the sales prices of the cars were much more than the cost of three or four homes......they were that expensive. Production at all of them was rather low........certain engine/chassis combinanations were often in the single or low double digits. Around 1915 lots of changes began in the states with car manuf
    1 point
  23. Wonderful - that's a date! Tony
    1 point
  24. An interesting idea John but i think that it would be safer for all the other road users if I didn't. Evening All, Thanks for asking after me, I appreciate it. I am, as you can tell, still in the land of the living but with winter coming, in the near future, there was a job that I needed to get done and If I have mentioned this before please forgive me for repeating myself, i blame it on my age. When i built my workshop i built it to suit Land Rovers, so it didn't need to be that high or have tall doors, fast forward several years and the vehicles that i own, build, have got ta
    1 point
  25. I humbly apologise for my behaviour.. I am working to the resolve the issue as soon as possible..
    1 point
  26. I know Dover is getting to be a bit dodgy at the moment, but ..maybe a bit excessive? 😂 When the crap settles maybe we locals can bring some vehicles down for a play?
    1 point
  27. You realise I am now knee deep in drool? Please put warning before posting such pictures! 😭
    1 point
  28. This is a nice looking Jeep but certainly not accurate for WW2, and if it is to be a post war Jeep then the RAF Blue needs to be gloss. Possibly the fenders needed to be gloss black too, as per the AMO for postwar. In WW2 Jeeps in the RAF were quite rare in the UK and 4 Group Bomber Command. I bet 4 Group never had any like this as the vehicle is too small to carry a bomber crew, too underpowered to pull a bomb load or a bowser and the CO was more likely to be driven around in the saloon behind the Jeep in this photo to wish his crews good luck etc. There were a few Jeeps in Bomber C
    1 point
  29. For a running engine that rocker shaft looks very dry. Might just be the video but is it getting an oil feed OK?
    1 point
  30. I like the work round the windscreen recess. Looks very neat.
    1 point
  31. Hi, decided to fix the old fork with corrosion. Steps to repair: 1. cut in the place of the old repair 2. design and drawing of "prostheses" is a workshop 3. design of wheel axle holders 4. assembly of "prostheses" with handles - welding 5. assembly of new elements with the original fork. It is still necessary to set the parallelism and axiality after welding, grind and it will be ready for initial assembly and fitting. Best regards Paul
    1 point
  32. Definitely a Greek marking "Σ450" and a crown. Have seen such markings on quite a lot of motorcycles of different brands. Attached a picture from a 3HW with such a marking.... Kostas
    1 point
  33. I believe that is a Greek marking...with the Hellenic crown below.
    1 point
  34. Cross posted to MLU Forum where many people with trucks fitting these tyres reside: http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?p=268264#post268264
    1 point
  35. Yes Normandy last year... Looks like you’re all good now 👍🏻
    0 points
  36. Not that one, but likely from the same yard. The overgrown brambles are just like those I cut out of the engine bay. My track had both fenders but was missing the right vertical engine cover.
    0 points
  37. I agree with everything you have stated.
    0 points
  38. I wouldn't count on it. There is a very strong collecting mentality in France where early vehicles are saved from scrap but stored away in barns. Saved for the future but generally only become available when the owner dies. There are a few exceptions where there have been some really quality ground up restorations but these generally are the exception. The Berliet foundation did a string of superb WW1 restorations, but until recently they were left locked in a shed and not viewable by the public. They are now dispersed on loan around the country at various museums which is a much better approa
    0 points
  39. After fifty years in the hobby, and this week would have been fifty years since my first Hershey meet.......I can tell you Peerless stuff has been non existent since WWII. Many of the early truck chassis have been made into speedsters. (Repowered with bigger engines.)I have seen a handful of V-8 Peerless cars from the 1915-1920 era........EVERY ONE was cut down into a speedster. Peerless was an early “must have” for many collections and museums. They simply just don’t get out often. Many people are afraid to drive things that parts are non existent. Now many of the “best” Peerless cars are stu
    0 points
  40. Slight deviation but local bus historian Bill Ward came across a early postcard titled “Changing the guard Mersea Strood “with a Daimler bus . Mersea Island is where we live and in both wars was a restricted area with a checkpoint on the only road onto the Island known as the Strood which is covered by the tide.
    0 points
  41. The point about not using an EP oil is that your box probably has bronze selector forks in it. EP additives eat into bronze and other yellow metals and the surface crumbles away. This is nothing to do with viscosity. I would expect that your box requires straight 50 or 90 viscosity gear oil but I haven't got a book on it. Going back to double clutching, it is entirely up to you to get the gears rotating at exactly the right speed so that they can engage. If you don't they simply won't go in and will do a lot of damage as they make that grating noise. Modern boxes do it for you, this
    0 points
  42. Terry from Middlesbrough in the North East of England saying Hello here, I have recently bought a 1943 Austin K2 flat bed, it shows signs of blackout use with traces of white paint on mudgaurd edges and has faint paintwork that would have been some sort of front wing markings, this is going to be my work truck, I hope to get about 40 years more out of it before passing it on to my son or grandson, I need some rubbers for the door window seals, the door bottoms have rotted out due to the lack of them I think so any help on rubber profiles for seal on the truck would be very much appreciated
    0 points
  43. Sorry if I implied you were responsible, that was not my intention at all. Rather simply your signature is very appropriate to all the recent changes.
    0 points
  44. Andrew you missed this one. 😆😆😆Ron
    0 points
  45. Here is the Blue/White version at 13 seconds in on this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5479MDsXSmQ
    0 points
  46. Can't leave Dad to have all the fun! Now that the front wheels are on along with the track rod, king pins and stub axles, the king pins need some greasers. We are fortunate to have the remains of three but, of course, we will eventually need four. They screw into the top of the king pin and , when the knob is turned, a piston is driven downwards expelling the grease and pushing it down the hole in the king pin. I took them apart for a clean and to assess what parts were missing. This was the most complete example having both the knob and locking clip. We have two
    0 points
  47. Having never seen ECL self generating lamps before I purchased the pair at the end of last month, I found another one this week. It also needs some weld repairs to the generator and some parts making. My good friend Mick has found me a lovely Zenith carb to replace the unsightly aluminium downdraft version fitted to the Austin generator. The Zenith does not appear to be missing any parts, unlike most autojumble finds. Mick has been a huge support (enthusiasm and parts) for my projects over the years for which I am deeply grateful.
    0 points
  48. It’s all coming along nicely, it will be ready for paint in no time.
    0 points
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