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  1. Actually, this isn't really a military item. Some years ago, it was realised by Greyhound owners that, as their racing dogs aged, they missed the track, they missed their friends and rivals and generally became depressed. But, chasing the hare proved all too much. So, White City introduced a veterans' day for retired racing greyhounds. It included some bottom-sniffing, a set of lamp posts were set up for competitive pi**ing (height achieved, quantity and colour were all judged) and the highlight was the closing event... the veterans' race. Chasing after a hare at their age would have clearly been impossible and so... thinking back to their childhood fairy tales the organisers remember the tale of the hare and the tortoise. This is one of the tortoises which were pulled, very slowly round the track in front of the old dogs.... I'll get my coat.
    6 points
  2. Something all of us know. 🤣
    4 points
  3. Bad weather's no longer a problem, I’ve just extended the garage😬 The wife had mixed emotions and started shouting something about a Fox Hat !! no idea what she was saying as I had the grinder going🤔
    4 points
  4. What, like all those GMCs registered as 1939 in the 1980s? 😉
    3 points
  5. Spare wheel fitting. This has been an on going mission for some time, and it has turned into a complete saga worthy of a telling by the great Bernhard Cribbins on Jackanory, except he would have to read it after the watershed time so as not to give the kids nightmares. It started last winter when son Stuart and I set out to fit the recently reconditioned carrier parts back on. All seemed to go well except we ran out of the right size bolts and had to leave a couple of bits off. We also left off some of the cross bracing to allow access to the air intake pipes and compressor condenser unit, which was yet to be refurbished and fitted. As you can see access is difficult, and I've still got the return pipe to squeeze in. One other bit still needing attention was the foot plate that secures the wheel when in the stowed position. I had difficulty in obtaining the right width of Balata strip Finally got some, and a selection of extra long bifurcated rivets. The wheel itself was cleaned and painted a couple of months back so we were ready to go It's a bit of a fight to the death to get the wheel onto the carrier as you have to wedge it in between the side of the pump box and the carrier. And it's a tad heavy too. Got it on in the end and began to wind it up. Bit of brake adjustment was required along the way to stop it unwinding by itself, and things were looking good. Until it got jammed halfway up. It appeared that now I have pumped the tyre up to the right pressure, it has grown too fat to fit on the carrier and gets stuck on the side. So wind it back down, and scratch head for a bit, needs some spacers behind it to move it over a bit. So fight the wheel off, make and fit some spacers, fight to get it back on and wind it up again. All good this time, so well pleased with the result. That was a fortnight ago!! This week got the condenser and pipework fitted and set about fitting the remaining cross bracing. None of the bolt holes want to line up, the whole carrier frame is leaning over toward the cab. More head scratching. Right, slacken all the bolts and use a ratchet strap to pull it over a bit. Fit the braces and tighten the bolts back up. Worked well, all bits fitted, all bolts tight, job done, wind wheel back up Except it gets stuck!! This time on the other side, on the pump box. Needless to say there was a few words, which will not get printed here, and the wheel comes down again, this time to remove the spacers, because now the frame is straight, there is loads of room on the carrier side. Finally, after all the aggro it is all fitted and it winds right up and can be stowed correctly Hopefully it will not need to come down again, ever!!
    3 points
  6. Robert with the deepest of respect take a deep breath and go and sit in the shade old friend Best regards Pete
    2 points
  7. Guys, Yes, I regularly correspond with Mike Starmer and we both agree that seeing a colour photo of a British & Commonwealth Army truck or non-armoured type from WW2 is very rare and often corrupted by the type of colour film but here are some from my collection showing the early G3 / G4 scheme used before SCC.2; This line up of the first Canadian troops to be posted to the UK and I believe they date from 1940. Most of the Canadian CMPs are equipped with CMP 11 Cabs and Bedford & Morris vehicles with aero screens etc Last is an ambulance which I can only guess is in SSC.2 from an unknown date, that shows SCC.2 was mostly brown with a touch of green to it. It was a gift from the Canadian Red Cross.
    2 points
  8. A few shots of Tomo’s effort's today as phase one comes to a close . I think the photos speak for themselves as I can’t praise Tomo enough for his work plus it’s been a good excuse to have a beer each evening to discuss the finer points including “never show a rivet a full brush”
    2 points
  9. You may laugh, but one project I was involved with a while ago was the "environmentally friendly torpedo". Andy
    2 points
  10. My dad was the development manager at Muir Hill and was in charge of provision of this specially adapted 171 to the MOD. We went to St Kilda twice for the initial tests and the wading tests. I have some super 8 film of the tests. I will try to put them on here. Keith Trinder
    2 points
  11. exactly, and i was trying to help, give us the location, the government can't assassinate everyone thats been on this forum. bugger what's that red dot tracking across the wall? 😣...................................................................................
    2 points
  12. top coated the frame yesterday and left the dry so today started to fit all the bits back next week i plan to rebuild the axles this will include resetting the crown wheel and pinion, new bearings and oil seals
    2 points
  13. We call that a "Bloomer Loaf" so the pedal must hence forth be called a Bloomer Pedal 😄 Ron
    2 points
  14. Hi Ron, though I’d share with you an image of the original fuel tank, you can still see it attached to the fuel tap🙈😂
    2 points
  15. Not much progress at the moment, I’ve managed to bare metal the roof and it’s not as bad as I thought 🤥 A couple of coats of bonda to protect it and show what needs repairing Now ......I don’t want to blow my own trumpet.......but .......I pretty confident that when I am finished you won’t see a single repair !! You’ll see about 50 😬
    2 points
  16. Reminds me of the Father Ted episode where he damaged the prize car for the raffle and then attempted to tap out the dent.
    2 points
  17. I have just discovered this thread. My grandfather George Thorpe was chief steward on the HMS Vandyck.I have his account of the bombing and his subsequent internment written in pencil at the time in a very small leather journal.As well as his account it also contains addresses of several men onboard and their wives.It is very interesting as to his take on what happened in the original bombing,and includes dramatic scenes of the struggle at sea to Bleik.If it is of interest to anyone I would be happy to write most of it out verbatim.
    2 points
  18. You may have fun with the council planning people. I tried and failed to obtain planning permission for a building to store my MVs because no-one outside our "bubble" understands MVs, and the local council considers anything connected with them to be commercial. Andy
    2 points
  19. Just received the results FBHVC Press Release 17.11.2020__ - National Historic Vehicle Survey Results.pdf
    2 points
  20. Here is an interesting image. Photographed in Tunisia in 1930.
    2 points
  21. We used to bang 4" nails into a plank and bend them round pram wheel axels!!!
    2 points
  22. I personally don't have a problem with replicas as long as they are not portrayed as originals. I think that anyone who puts the effort into restoring anything is worthy of praise, the only exception, in my mind, are those who pay to have the work done and the then tell everyone that they restored the item themselves, why not just be honest. As for not using the correct thickness of steel, sometimes there seems to be little point, unless it can be seen and the in a lot of cases it can be packed out to look correct if you are using thinner material or ground back, if it is slightly too thick. If you take my Panzer 2 for example, what would be the point of using the correct thickness steel, apart to help rigidity, it only adds weight, increases cost and adds stress to the the running gear, apart from which even if I were to use the correct thickness steel, it still isn't armoured. I could of course spend a fortune on original fittings but why bother, it is after all a replica and everything that I produce is copied or built to scale. Apart from which, the whole project was purly an engineering exercise, for my own pleasure, to see if I could produce the components at home. If you have the ability, motivation and the imagination, build what you like but like what you build and when you have finished, take satisfaction in what you have achieved and don't worry about the rivet counters, most of them have neither the ability, motivation or imagination to start, let alone finish, a project. Jon
    2 points
  23. You are too kind, Ed. We only do it for the fun of it and the friends we make around the world. Steve
    2 points
  24. It was a French scrapyard that the previous Dutch collector bought it from. I had it shipped here on a Dutch trailer with an English tractor unit and a Polish driver. A truly European effort.
    2 points
  25. I expect Lex can sell you one Andrew......For about 1 1/2 times the value of your G3😏 Bloody expensive door stops. Ron
    2 points
  26. Bit more progress on the Tanker this weekend. Down to the small bits now, the five minute jobs that take all day. Fuel filter/sediment bowl fitted and a quick test. Felt it was worth a short video, as she ticked over without stalling. Bit too slow mind and still needs adjusting. Now the fuel tank is fitted, next job wire up the fuel gauge. Connecting the sender is fun, working through a small hole in the pump room floor. Five cables to cram in, on the right terminals. Then the dashboard end, which is not quite as bad. Took the steering wheel off to get better access, but still managed to scrape off a fair bit of paint, which will need touching up later. Good news is the gauge works, and appears to be spot on accurate Which is more than can be said of the tank gauge, which is showing about 5 gallon more than is actually in the tank. Horn went in next, refitting the original one that has been cleaned up and adjusted. Not exactly loud for a truck this size, but a healthy beep, beep that will do the job. Moved on to the lights. I wired in the brakes and indicators a while ago, so at least we had the important ones when we drove over to the workshop for painting the tank earlier in the year. Now side, tail and head lamps get the benefit, and the new rear marker lights I recently fitted. Plugging them in under the dash was the easy bit, clipping in all the conduit takes the time Near side head and side light wires here, under the front bumper. Originally they were 2 BA screws into threaded holes. All of them sheared off during the dismantling process, so I have drilled them right out now and put nuts on the inside. Still 2 BA so reasonably authentic. Switch on and get a very bright pair of "un Militant" lamps. Bought on fleebay, they were listed for Land Rover, but fit into standard military shells nicely, just replace the 12 volt bulbs with a pair of 24 volt zenon truck bulbs. 110watts on dipped beam, can't wait to try them in the dark. Might actually be able to see where we are going. Thinking I was on a roll, I cracked on with the rear markers, and then, it all went pear shaped. Struck down by the curse of the elastic tape measure, to begin with. Nice new loom in new conduit that is about 6" too short to plug in. Don't quite know how I managed that one. Near side went in nicely, but that had a different issue Spot the schoolboy error! nearly fried the whole truck with this one. Double connector looks just right in the little clip. But, of course, it is a dead short to earth, not that I noticed until I tried plugging it in. There were many sparks and a rather scorched terminal. Singles look untidy, but at least they work. Got there in the end, and now have a full set of lights, including a couple of extra modifications for the modern times, like a reversing lamp and hazard lights. Back to the downside, dynamo has stopped charging again. Last time it was dirty contacts in the control box, and after a good clean up it was all was fine. A check of plugs and wiring this time, and it seems to be the same problem. Although, I may have blown the fuse inside, with the dodgy marker light. Either way the box is off again, and back in the home workshop for further investigation tomorrow. Sounds easy, but to get to it the drivers seat has to come out and the main electrical junction box on the back of the seat frame has to go as well. Another 5 minute job that took half an hour. Last job today take a picture of the whole thing. More than a bit pleased with how she is shaping up. Certainly be ready for next years show season
    2 points
  27. Yes, but the man that never had a ****-cart, or made a mistake never made anything. These jobs are only for the brave... and its looking good. Dave
    2 points
  28. Please, please tell me that the logbook has survived? I always find id rather sad when you have to go down the route of age related plate but....there is a chance; KENTKent History & Library Centre, James Whatman Way, Maidstone, ME14 1LQ (03000 41 31 31) Email: archives@kent.gov.uk Open Monday to Saturday.Registers 1904-1974 (Note KN 4488-92 are omitted from the KN register). GIM register D-G 1-1199; HMC registers 1905-20; TP registers (KT and KE) 1923-34; Registers of imported vehicles. Many of the old archive records are in a word CRAP! One of my bikes which luckily was known to the DVLA still retained the original 20's logbook but Dad bought it because we were looking for a vintage bike with a local number. When I approached the records office (it is shown that they have these registers) we were told that they had been lost in a fire so instead I was send a copy from the cancelation book....our bike is in it; taken off the road in 1935. All it shows is reg number, type of vehicle and who had it. Later records from the three letter sequence that survive include the date but zilch about what the vehicle is! Anyone wishing to try and trace a registration mark head here; Kithead Trust | Educational charity set up to collect and preserve material from the transport industries who have a complete list of what survives and where.
    1 point
  29. Absolutely brilliant, what a job you guys are doing. That signwriting is very high quality, such a skill to do.
    1 point
  30. I think today is the last days work on steviem jeep that involved rebuilding the passengers side front wing and what a job I think i could now weld a tee bag as today that's what i have done it turned out well a bit out of shape so with the help of a big hammer it now fits some body filler ,red primer and the last of the top coat very dark drab then bolted on. Next week end its back off to steviem and he is going to finish it off just remember i am at the end of the phone, hope you have enjoyed the rebuild as i have and i think i will do the same again putting up the rebuild photos with my next jeep for myself it is a very late ford GPW no filter on bulkhead, deep mud exhaust and 700x16 tyres all the best jerry
    1 point
  31. This came as a surprise and with no warning it's like been sent back to pre school
    1 point
  32. The signwriting is superb and really adds that finishing touch.
    1 point
  33. Wow, blimey Tomo you have a lovely job of that. I showed Mrs Scrunt and Farthing I was so impressed, and we both remarked on the quality in the shading. Nice work.
    1 point
  34. Its story is apparently , It was sold to the USA in 65, then it moved to Canada in a major collection. The collection was donate to a museum, but the bus was discarded due to no canadian history. In 86 it was sold to a Denmark where it had been hiding for about 30 years.
    1 point
  35. CPA Radiators at Grantham had square gills available when I took the core for my Fowler motor plough to be soldered up. This would have been somewhere around 2005 - can't believe it's that long. No idea if they still do this or at what price, but might be worth a try. Andy.
    1 point
  36. Evening All, If I decide to build another tank it would probably be a Panzer iv but that would probably be a project too far. I have been trying to finish the turret, all the little fiddly detail bits that I didn't have enough information for. There's a marker attached to the hull just below the turret ring to show when the turret is facing the front that needed adding. Whilst I had completed the wiring up to the slip ring in the base of the hull, I hadn't done anything about the wiring in the turret. The wires run from the slip ring up the leg of the commanders chair and into a square junction box attached to the turret ring behind the commanders seat back rest. Here they split, the power goes to the turret light and power socket while the wires for the intercoms continue into an adjoining junction box where the head phones and throat mike plug in. For the life of me I couldn't find a blanking plate for the larger box so I had to make one and the plugs in the comm's box are not the correct ones but they will do for now. I tried to buy the P clips to save time but I couldn't find the right sizes so I made a little bending jig and made my own. I ran a single wire just to illustrate where the wires run. The last item for now is a box that would contain cartridges for a flare gun, again it fits behind the commanders seat but on the opposite side to the junction boxes. The picture below is from the Tank Museums Panzer ll, it is clear from another picture of the same box that it has been bent forward and originally would have been in a more upright position as in the second picture. I have actually, very nearly finished the project in it's original form, that was to build a Panzer ll turret, just a two more items and I am done. Jon
    1 point
  37. so what have i been up to today well as all the parts have come back from blasting i have been cleaning the powder off and priming and some top coating also taking a look at the body need to order some parts i also picked up the rebuilt rad 1 x top hat section fuel tank strap joes motor pool number tn8j31pa 1 x passenger side fish plate joes motor pool number tnsqenhp 1 x top hat section under the back floor jeeparts have them in photos for you
    1 point
  38. Evening All, I had quite a productive weekend making lots of little items for the linkage from the remote trigger in the turret gearbox to the MG, so now you can see how it operates. The other item was the cover that goes over the turret ring gear, well it's nearly finished but I was requested to make some biscuits by my dear wife and I know never to argue where the biscuit box is empty. Until next time thanks for looking. Jon
    1 point
  39. welcome aboard Toby !
    1 point
  40. All the Triumph's used the double plunger type tap 1/4 x 1/4 BSP threads. https://www.tricor-andy.com/product/petrol-tap-double-plunger-type/ Ron
    1 point
  41. You should try a hobbyist or a college with those techniques. At the university they were happy to make a part for my friends antique grammophone. Otherwise they were printing dinosaurs and stupid things like that.
    1 point
  42. The main cross section in my photo is the JMP piece in the picture and at the time I restored my jeep they only did the ACM2 replacement channels you have pictured and as I have a ACM1 tub, that was the only piece I used... So, I have the rest spare if you want to PM me an offer?
    1 point
  43. Hi Your tub number 219059 would suggest it was manufactured in march 1945. Is this roughly consistent with your chassis number?
    1 point
  44. Sat here in my office at my PC I have just caught sight of that Rotherhams oiler again and remembered about it. Will it do you to replace the squashed one?. Bar the threads it looks identical. Let me know
    1 point
  45. You are doing a fantastic job but I notice that the Chassis Bars are slightly more agricultural than the ones on the the chassis of my 1929 20/25hp. Rolls-Royce which I finished wire brushing the outside of today.
    1 point
  46. Never let it be said that we would ever do anything remotely illegal Lex! Ron
    1 point
  47. That is very clever. Well done.
    1 point
  48. I am looking at HMVF on a PC running Linux Mint. I see quite a lot of minor changes to colours and text layout which I will presumably get used to but I note when I look at a thread that I have looked at before, there is now a line drawn across the page under the posts that I have already seen, thus highlighting those that have been added. Good idea ! I also find that, in the list of threads, if I hover the cursor over the title of a thread so that the preview window appears, if I then click on 'mark this thread read' button, instead of just deleting the green (or is it blue now ?) dot, it opens the thread which I think is not what should happen. I find it very frustrating when computers do not behave intuitively and when the 'updates' change things that worked perfectly well before - but then I am an old git ! Many thanks though to those that have been wrestling with the latest round of problems on behalf of the rest of us and indeed for the effort that goes into the general running of the site that most of us are completely unaware of. David
    1 point
  49. I'll be prepared to wager Ben's Grover washers didn't arrive packaged like this:
    1 point
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