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  1. Here's the little film they made there, can watch it over and over! Cheers, Lex
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  2. Hello Bob, that is the 7th. RNF from the Tyne and Tees Division in training, south of Amiens, a little hamlet called Le Croq, (near Fontaine-Bonneleau) the (stone) building is actually a church, I still have to go back there to do a proper "then and now" picture, with the outfits, and a lonely M20. But we did visit, and talked to the locals, here 2 pictures, (thanks Jan, and Rich!) sort of then and now, have many more pictures in that area! Also added a picture of the back of the church, so you can see the steeple, plus the original IWM picture, the cameraman had to stand on the roof of his Humber to take the picture! Cheers, Lex
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  3. I have a friend with a penchant for leather, though this is probably not the place for that sort of thing... Actually, a friend of mine worked as an orthotist at the local hospital. When I needed leather clutch linings all I had to do is provide him a template (the drawing office at work had an A1 plotter in those days) he would contact his footwear supplier and the linings would come back in return for a NHS prescription charge. £5 from memory. Between us, we've relined 3 Saunderson tractor clutches and two Albion clutches. Our technique is to soak the leather in water for a week and apply it to the cone while it is still wet (and supple). Punch the first two holes, fit the rivets but don't rivet them up, pull the leather up tight, and mark the next hole. Punch the hole half a hole short and pull up tight with the rivets. Continue like this until all the rivets are in place. Then remove the rivets one at a time and replace them with short annealed ones and rivet them up. I'm not sure how practical this method would be for lining the steel backing strip as used in the Peerless. As the leather dries it shrinks and pulls up tight to the cone We then "fit" the cone to the flywheel by blueing the inside of the flywheel, spinning the cone into the cups and filing the high spots with a rasp. I've never had to uniformly reduce the thickness of a leather lining; I'm intrigued to know how you get on. Doc.
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  4. We use paint strainers and they are really useful but I would think those very big clumps would need fishing out first?
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  5. As a 26 year old design/detail draughtsman in 1979/80 my test to become a Project Design draughtsman was to produce the 2D manufacturing drawings for the clutch bellhousing and the gearshift casting. The bellhousing was to mate the ZF gearbox to the Rover V8 Engine. I also did the dashboard labels, translated from Swedish to English. I remember ding the detail drawing for the engine mounts [ designed by a colleague ] which i was unsure about how they were made. I still have the drawing prints today and often wondered what happened to the vehicle ! I keep meaning to model it in 3D as CAD did not exist in those days. I recall that I used a stencil provided by the Volvo Engineer (called Anders? ) for the text and the lines were using Pentel pencils, so not quite freehand. The patterns used for the casting of the bellhousing were made locally at a company in Chesterfield, Derbyshire. It is a while ago and a lot of industries and drawings later - I did the fuel tank and visited a company in Wellingborough with the fuel Cap for them to fit onto the tank. I only had one short drive in this vehicle and managed to try the diff-locks in a small area on the Dosco site which used to be a residential army camp during WW2 DOSCO also added an ambulance body onto another 4x4 chassis and Volvo provided a 6 wheel truck - all of these kept the Volvo Engigne and all three went on the British Army Trials. I was not allowed to go on these trials with the vehicles even though I was the only one with a professional Class 1 licence [ still annoyed but still alive 🙂 ] The identity on the front grille on the Hawker Siddley logo HS100-4. This vehicle was said to have been used to pull the competition out of the mud when they had become stuck and the British Army were impressed but this is only hear say to me. I also know why the project was allegedly dropped by the Dosco MD at the time.
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  6. I agree this is the best way, although you can use the kitchen sieve first to get rid of the bigger lumps that will block the funnel strainer.
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  7. From the Model T Ford Forum:- 'The World War I Quartermaster Olive Drab was described by Charles Lemons, curator of the Patton Museum at Fort Knox, as the colour of pig slop, that is a very muddy olive brown. The colour for this Olive Drab was established by the Manual for the Quartermaster Corps, 1917, Par. 3964. The pigments used to mix Olive Drab were very simple: black and ochre.' The whole topic:- http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/726541.html?1487529624
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  8. The paint lump thing really isn't a problem. I see you are mixing your paint and thinners in a mixing pot before putting in your gun. Well, go to your local auto paint supplier and pick up a pack of paint strainers, they are conical paper things with a fine plastic mesh in the bottom, sit one in the top of your gun pot and pour your thinned paint through it. I do this with all my paint just to make sure i don't get any blockages. Good luck. Richard
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  9. I would ask your paint supplier or local paint shop what temperature they run their paint booth at for modern paints. I would think the can would also have that information on it.
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  10. I am not that knowledgeable about paint but I was told a long time ago that it is very important with synthetic paint that you never put unused, thinned paint back in the tin as that will cause the rest of the tin to start to set. I have dutifully followed this rule and never had problems but I really don't know how true it is. Could this be your problem ? I agree with Duson that something finer than a kitchen sieve would be better. I have used a square of kitchen paper towel (very strong when wet and disposable without causing divorce) in a scrap kitchen sieve that was dumped because it was too coarse and damaged. I must congratulate you on your new found welding and fabrication skills - you really are getting good at this ! David
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  11. Finished the top coat today and still having problems 🤨 Strained the paint and yes the wife knows I’ve borrowed a sieve 🤥 Still having problems with the paint, it’s not particularly cold down here but the paint is really gloppy, I’ve had to thin it more than usual and it’s still not spraying right. The paint is synthetic but I don’t know if it’s affected by lower temperature, it was 15 today so not what you would call cold, any ideas??? Some of the door parts painted windscreen frames lastly the doors. any spray paint advise or pointers would be greatly appreciated.
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  12. I’ve only just seen this post so this is a very late comment! we were stationed in Bahrain in 1962 to 1964 as my father was RAF Police and I definitely remember the Blue tilts. It’s stuck in my memory as a great colour combination.
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  13. The Windak smock is covered in this book (I haven't read the book):- Denison : British Airbourne Specialist Clothing From WW2 TO The Present Day. https://www.paulmeekins.co.uk/product/sku/67633
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  14. Thanks for trying that Adrian, I always try to find locations, and know how frustrating, and difficult it is! but I did find this one! Lex
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  15. Hi @Morris C8 Keith. I put some time into trying to trace this, without success, except to say it is in Paris. This time it is not a needle in a haystack, but a needle in a pile of needles, with some missing. Café Biard was a chain of Parisian coffee shops. There were 15 or so in 1900, and far more by 1940. This article explains more: https://www.parisladouce.com/2021/07/ancien-cafe-biard-de-la-rue-montorgueil.html I checked the addresses listed, there were a couple that looked promising, but the Hausmanian architecture of Paris is all very similar, and I could see detail differences on the building across the road each time. Also, roads like Ave de Sevres have been heavily redeveloped. Finally, I searched for period postcards, and that threw up even more addresses, so I admit defeat. Best Regards, Adrian
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  16. I am sure for "direct impact" that is correct - or at least, that is effectively what the helmet standard requires, but for anything other than direct full on impact - which is obviously much more likely, then modern full face helmets will in general of course provide far better protection than a WW2 DR helmet. Just look at how the DR helmets are attached to your head - pathetic leather strap that will either break or slice your jugular! I know a couple of riders who ride to events - quite a long way - and they have a modern helmet for that purpose and swap to DR for display riding. But its up to the individual of course.
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  17. Well, time passes quickly... About a year or 2 ago the DODGE project was put on hold, because some motorcycle projects came inbetween... But we're back on track now! And we're really starting to see progress. Long story short, the woodwork of the cargo body was a real pain. We had to refabricate everything (including Bows, lazy backs, floor...),. Luckily we still had a pattern to work with. A couple of weeks ago we prepared the DODGE for it's final layer of pain. We got a new supplier for paint, so the color is a bit different from what we started with. However i feel like it's a better match to the original paint we found and a lot easier to spray. So here's where we are today, we fitted the bows and lazy backs and test fitted the canvas. Fitted the seats and completed the dash. What still needs to be done: -The wheels still need a layer of OD. -Trailer socket needs to be fitted and wired -Headlights/Blackout/marker lights/taillights need to be fitted. -Headlight grilles need to be fitted -Markings need to be applied. As for markings: my friend (who's an expert on US vehicle markings) and me did some research. We started with the original markings we found on the DODGE: -Shipping stencils - Really big invasion star (+gas detection paint) - Caution left hand drive / NO SIGNAL (indicating this Dodge was in the UK for some time) - The name ''Michigan'' - ??-736? on passenger side bumper and STAR ??9 on the driver side front bumper -Bridge plate and POM code White-Yellow-White 49793 - USA 2219960 in blue drab and white The POM-code is not in the known list, but combined with the 736 found on the bumpers we made a researched guess that Michigan belonged to 20th corps, 736 field artillery. A FA batallion using 8-inch howitzers/ M4 High speeds tractors. A DODGE WC52 would be used in the Service battery or Headquarters. This We can't be 100% sure unless the POM-code can be deciphered. I've decided to go with XX-736F SV-9. I'll be doing blue drab/ white numbers and big invasion star. More to follow soon... Niek
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  18. Could it have been a Windak smock as worn by Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery and other officers?
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  19. Today’s update. The original meta filter I purchased was missing the bottom hose connection so I’ve had to try and replicate one. I’ve had to make them in parts and silver solder them together? Slowly nearing completion.
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  20. One other thing to try is keeping the tin lid clean so any dried paint doesn't fall into the pot when you lever the lid open. This is particularly a problem with those large, plastic B&Q-type buckets of paint. I was doing some DIY recently and ended up in a right state with all the bits which had fallen from the plastic lid into the paint and then got onto the brush.
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  21. A nice dry day for spraying then?
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  22. Small amount of progress and a lesson learned!! 🤨 Finally got a bit of free time to start painting the top coat on the doors and various other parts, it was going oh so well until I went to mix the paint 🙄 Clearly I should have listened to the advise given earlier in this blog in regards to paint storage 🤔 a wise man once said “ decant your 5L tin into individual 1L tins “ ……..well I didn’t and now I am paying for it….. 3L of paint now useless and the painful exercise of straining the lumps out to paint the doors. Lumps strained and the cab is green…..again
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  23. Hi Lex As I mentioned, as a member, I am in touch with the register but they are unable to provide the required info but they are helping to look at other options.
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  24. Hi No, there was no useful info except the normal invoice etc from the vendor. The Tilly had been off the road since at least 1977having been stored at the vendors father's workshop. I have a copy of the invoice when it was sold at auction in 1977 as an un-registered project. I do have its reg plate details but I'm having problems getting hold of anybody at Western Australia's Dept of Transport to see if they keep post war records.
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  25. Ron and Lex, Thanks for the response. No offense taken on anything. Painting the exhaust system, can do. Thanks I did not know it needed to be silver. The canvas thing is just to keep ethanol gas off the tank while I am messing with it. Front stays, that is a tricky one. The front fender was rusted in half when I got it, there was not enough strength left in the metal to hold it together, so I made a fender under the fender to keep it together. I like keeping the original parts together, but if I can find an original I would probable replace. I know the carb and filter are not right, I think I have some of the right stuff, but I have to make the bent choke pipe. The original engine may have those parts, so I am dragging my feet till I know for sure It will never be mine. He did sell me the original folding kick starter. Does an original mag cover look different? I made that one. The folding foot rest and stand, among other things, are my creation based on pictures. The original front light shell and stitch came with the bike, but the black out contraption and rear tail light are what I made based on pictures on this site and google. The original engine is owned by a real nice guy how wants to hang on to it till he gets a newer flea he has going. A donor engine. I remind him ever once in a while that I am still want it, but he is cross country, so emails is all I can do. Let me know if you see anything else. Thanks Chris
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  26. OK no offence meant but since Lex has critiqued a couple of things. The front mudguard stays need re-organizing. The magneto cover and air filter are not WD. (Time to twist that bloke's arm who has your engine) Ron
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  27. With the chassis number being between two known contracts, doesn't this give you a start and end date when your Tilly was made, possibly down to a few months?
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  28. We are in the process of making a puller to get the brake drum off. In the meantime, Father has been pressing on with the clutch. Once he got home, he tried wrapping it around the band. Fortunately, we had got the curve about right. Then he drilled the holes through. We were a bit suspicious of drilling leather but he tells me that it is fine if you just let the drill take its time. He did have a practice first on an offcut though! After trimming to length, he fixed the leather with copper brake lining rivets. It all looks very nice but Dad tells me that the leather looks a little thicker than the original. The question is should we just try it or should we attempt to true it up by turning in the lathe? We haven't played this particular game before! Steve 🙂
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  29. Thanks Niels. Certainly our lorry and we have some very similar books on file. Let's hope they find a good home! I am pleased to report that we did 37 miles on Sunday around the local villages and Tim has had his first driving lesson! He didn't do badly but needs some more practice with the gearbox. Now we can take two out at once! Steve 🙂
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  30. Maybe this is relevant for you https://www.facebook.com/groups/859603390775800/permalink/4272078632861575/
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  31. Ah that's because they didn't want the extra weight of the bigger rivets on the parachute. 😊 Ron
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  32. Runour is the Wehrmacht had more Morris-Commercial trucks than the British Army after French campaign. ! Craig
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  33. Bought a new welder, a good brand and gasless as my previous model. Tried it out last weekend and the weld quality was really good, very minimal burn through and the weld was very consistant. I managed to fabricate and weld in repairs to the passenger door skin and allowed it time to be fettled and then when cooled off a quick skim of filler over it. Next thing on the list or should I say plan is to build a permanent roof to the shelter that the lorry is under. I have drawn up a sectional roof and had it punched and folded at work. I have designed it basically as a big mechano set so that it can be put together without having too much to lift into place etc, it can be assembled in situ over the lorry. Now the weather down here in Somerset seems to have turned wet I think its needed more than ever! I will post some picks when its together.
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  34. This one on a Flea looks very much like the raised lettering on the second one down.......Put me down for a couple please. Ron
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  35. Based on the styles, I'd say the top, aluminium example is post-war. The next one down looks 1920s...the lighter -etched silver one with black background looks late thirties and is probably correct for early-war - and the bottom one perhaps early 1930s.
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  36. Thanks Ray! the Pack is in the Overloon War Museum, the second one is there too, but not on display yet, it will be in a US display, but I have parts for it that were found in the Rhine crossing's operation Varsity, with the 6th Airborne area, dug up some years ago. The glider is a part replica, that nobody in the UK wanted (or had room for) it, and RAF storage was being demolished, so it came to Holland a couple of years back, and is now permanently displayed in Overloon, a Dakota is also there. We have, for years been doing displays and shoots all over the place, but since the pandemic, all is on halt, so it's in the museum now for some time to come. Lex
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  37. Fordson 7V tipper they we used by the RE and RAF. Photo from my collection.
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  38. Keep on with the metal working skills Alfie. Not many youngsters seem to want to take on these sorts of trades now. Ron
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  39. It’s been a while since I last posted anything on ED the J type, and unfortunately its been just as long since I worked on it, I don’t know where this summer has gone! It has been somewhat filled up since moving house, and making that liveable, which already seems a never ending task! I have also been distracted with buying a vintage car, which was supposed to be a fun little toy for the summer, sold as running and ready to go… But I’m sure we all know what comes next, another vehicle all in bits! A few months tinkering with that got it eventually running how it should, before a big end failure. This is now stripped and the crankcase, crank and big ends with the white metal chap. To add extra time delay the shed that I house the Thornycroft in is due for demolition soon to make way for houses, how inconsiderate! So before I can make much further progress I will be spending time searching for another shed to keep it in, and then the mammoth task of moving the chassis, and all the junk that we accumulate whilst working on these things! Anyhow, there are a few tasks that I have yet to share that I completed before my summer break, the first of which being the scuttle. After much deliberation I came to the conclusion that the one fitted was uneconomical to repair and make right. It had been bodged and chopped so many times that it had lost most of its original charm, and if I were to make it right would end up being mostly new, so I decided to bite the bullet and make a full new one, which luckily on a J type isn’t of a too complicated construction. I was able to source the steel and have a local firm roll the top radius into it, so that all I needed to do was to cut the right shape out. The rolling was a very neat job, a nice seamless blend into the flat, very happy. After much carefull measuring and marking out, it was time to attack it with the grinder. The first mock up on the chassis was to prove my dimensions had come out correct! Next was more marking out! This time for all the scuttle furniture, and most importantly the mag switch, which now had a new home on a Thornycroft. The scuttle furniture was stripped back to bare metal/timber and primed, ready for assembly. Before a trial fitment of the fuel tank, again fingers crossed, making sure my measurements had come out correct! I took this opportunity to make the new timber packers for the fuel tank also. With the lot finish assembled, it was just a case of lifting the item onto the chassis to enable me to get the measurements I’d need to make the new bonnet. Happy with the result.
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  40. Out again today. Sprat and Winkle run, Sevenoaks to Hastings. Nice gentle end of season run through the Kent countryside, finish on the seafront at Hastings, with a fish and chip lunch on the beach. Seen here in the line up with 2 Matadors that have had a second career in civilian life.
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  41. Hello every body Last year I made 1/35 scale jeep based on several archive photos Regards Frédéric
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  42. Sometimes, I get totally immersed in a task and these little fuel cocks are a 'prime' example. They have been beautifully made by Rosso in Australia and sent over to help with the restoration, which is greatly appreciated and a terrific boost to the project. They are now fitted and looking very smart. Another trinket from the jewelry box, the No.4 greaser, was tried for a fitting at the airfield. I had some concerns about the length of the supporting post, but all was well and it looked superb in its new home. The only problem is, I need another one ! Thanks Dave.
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  43. They did burn a lot of equipment and had veh dumps near Dunkirk. I do have a large amount of photos showing burnt out veh. Photos from my collection
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  44. Small Jobs List - Part 2. Hi. First on the jobs list was to replace the four remaining wasted nuts on the holding down bolts for the rear springs. A right swine to do as they had to use a chisel take each one off and the photo shows them fitted and awaiting a coat of red oxide and green to finish. Next. On the front drivers side slave servo cylinder, there is a flip lid oil cup but this one was missing. On removing it it was full of a oily mud/sludge and no way could it of been getting oil down to the piston. The black worm type thing next to the cup is a pipe cleaner and not suitable for it's job. Sunday afternoon searching the WWW, I found a company who could supply different size flip lid oil cups, magic I thought now check the sizes and order one. The only problem was it had a BSP Thread but I would wait until it arrived to check it with the old oil cup. The old oil cup had a BSF Thread and the new cup was not going to fit the servo body. Thinks - how to make it fit ? On measuring the diameter of the old oil cup threads which was 0.350 thou and checking the threads on the body of the new oil cup which was 0.375 thou, it gave me 0.025 thou to cut a new thread on the new oil cup. So using a new die and filing a slight lead for the die, cut a new BSF Thread on it and fitted okay - see photo. All it needs now is a coat of paint and looks the job - black worm to the bin and oil cup to my spares box. One problem that has been nagging at me to get done for some time is the oil leak on the steering box. There must be a worn seal which is allowing the oil to leak out - see photo. It is running down the steering arm and any parts of the lorry that's in the same area, so it's a case of studying the workshop manual to get an idea as to which seal is leaking and replace it. The second bracket for the tube that fits at the rear of the lorry, is nearly finished but will need a touch of the welder. Also the brackets for the guide fitted to the two rear towers are marked out ready for cutting out but I had a slight problem cutting them out as I cut through the main cable to the grinder - slight bang and a puff of smoke. Power to parts of the house off and the dear wife rushing out to see if I was lit up like a Christmas tree ! On hiding the damaged grinder behind my back, I very carefully blamed the extension cable for causing the problem as it is a old one, all that I have to do now is join the cable back together and hope no damage has been done to the grinder as it is fairly new one. Cheers P.B
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  45. Home straight now! I have been assembling all the bits. firstly by fitting studs.. They were too long! I went back and checked the originals and they are identical so not sure what went wrong there. I took them out, threaded them a bit more and shortened them before fore finally fitting them. Then I got to the end ones and they were too short! They are identical to the originals but then I remembered that two studs had no nuts on them. I have made new ones. And for the top tank. This time, I cut the main gasket first. This is from rubberized cork, as recommended by Steve at CPA radiators. I treated the gaskets with 'Heldite' which had been recommended to me. It is very like the old 'Foliac' jointing and smells pretty bad. Works OK though. Then the water return. This time the studs were too long. I don't know how I managed to make such a mess of them. Oh well. And the filler neck after a bit of Brasso. The core still carries a lot of water stains so I had a go at cleaning it with soapy water and a scrubbing brush. This morning, I fitted the side castings and stuck the gasket down with Heldite. Amazingly, all of the holes lined up. Even more amazingly, the holes lined up in the bottom tank as well and I didn't have to poke a drill through any of them which was most satisfying. Turn it over and on to the top tank. That fitted OK as well so really making progress now. The moment of truth. Will it fit? The answer was no! The radiator tie-rod eye fouled the underside of the bonnet frame. I don't know how I managed that but in the end, just sprung it up and over the top. Spot the deliberate mistake! I fitted the outlet spigot the wrong way up! That was soon sorted and I cleaned and fitted the return pipe and the overflow. The rest of the engine is still filthy but that is a job for another day. The moment of truth! Filled to the brim with water coming out of the overflow but no leaks. Amazing. A whole lorry again! I swung it and it fired on the fifth compression which isn't bad after standing for over a year. I let it idle until everything was hot and no leaks showed themselves. We have a lorry again! Next job is to give it a good service and a thorough clean and out for a test run. Let's hope the weather is nice again next weekend. Steve 😁
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  46. Thanks Lex for trying. I Have had these original ww2 colour slides for a long time and could not ID the bridges. The last one with a barge is not the same bridge.
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  47. Ok, I thought asmuch, but have been searchin for bridges, all over Belgium and nothern France, but nothing quite like your picture! Lex
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  48. Another job that I had been meaning to do for a while was a quick strip of the steering box. I had been in the fortunate position of having the vehicle running a few times before it’s major strip down, fortunate for both the local pub, and for myself being able to identify what aspects were good about the vehicle, and what might need deeper investigation. I had identified on our couple of jaunts out that the steering on the Thornycroft was remarkably light and easy, at any speed over a crawl the use of one finger could be sufficient! This was a pleasant surprise to me, having owned a Matador in the past for which the same certainty couldn’t be said! I therefore had it in the back of my mind that the steering box should hopefully be a reasonably straightforward task, with no real faults needing investigation. On a personal note however I do enjoy stripping assemblies down to give myself both a further understanding on their operation, but also a reassurance on their physical condition. The steering box had been removed from the vehicle ready for disassembly. Nice to see the unit stuffed nicely with grease upon splitting the case. The shaft and lever arm were removed from the casing and given a good clean and inspection, very little wear apparent in here, even in the white metalled nut. With the nut showing minimal wear, the bearings in good nic and still tight on the shaft, It was just a simple case of reassembling and packing with fresh grease. The end float of the shaft can be adjusted on a nut against the thrust bearing, this was set back to the recommended adjustment before stripping the box back to metal. And then a couple of coats of primer on all the bits before top coating in black. The unit will then be fitted back into the chassis and all the jiblets refitted.
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  49. Wheel fitting time! Now that the rear wheels had finally been finished I was keen to get them fitted back on and have the Thornycroft sat back on all 4 wheels for the first time in what felt like too long! Before I could do this I needed to finish the rear brakes, for which the shoes had been sent away and re-lined. One of the brake shoes had had a packer fitted over the heel, I assume to account for some previous wear in a past life. I removed the packer and started fresh. A trial fitting of the wheels with the re-lined shoes showed up that the new lining was perhaps ever so slightly too thick, perhaps a imperial/metric material error. As it was a minimal amount I was able to get away with simply shaving a fraction off of the face of the heel, just tickling off the high spots was enough to get the drum to slide happily over the shoes, I couldn’t be happier with the fit! Unfortunately I can’t find any pics from these stages, however I always seem to remember to take pics of the shiny bits going back on! As mentioned previously I had found that the rear wheel bearings and bearing faces were all in impeccable condition, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had been renewed at some point in its life, and if not then they have been made of some bloody good stuff! Both bore clearances and end float were bob on, I wouldn’t have given them any less clearance if I were to make new ones so a good clean and some quality fresh grease will do here. A nice finishing detail was to sort out the rear hubcaps. The drive shaft flange is sandwiched between the hubcap and the wheel and so these needed to go on for me to call the back axle complete. The brass hubcaps were in a bad way, the near side example has had a hard life with many bumps and grazes, which I personally like, they tell a story! However for some reason someone in the past had decided to go over the brass with an angle grinder and had therefore left very unattractive marks all over. I spent a good couple of evenings with a file sympathetically removing the grinder marks, whilst leaving the hard life dents in tact. A good polish up and then they were ready to re-fit. Final assembly, with some quality (if expensive!) vintage bearing grease, and the re-lined brake gear all in place. I had made some new felt seals prior to fitting, so it was a simple case of popping them into the recess before sliding the wheel gently on. The wheel nuts were screwed on and the locking pegs fitted, in turn locked in with a split pin, as described in the Thornycroft Auriga book. There’s nothing else to do here but give the wheels a go! A very satisfying spin. IMG_0006.MOV The drive shafts were dragged off of the shelf and cleaned, as you can see these are still happily serviceable. The hub caps and drive flanges fitted. Back on 4 wheels again!
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