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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/17/2021 in Posts

  1. haha so all this time you have had pictures of the tanks!
    2 points
  2. Lex is good at coming round to your place and pissing on your firework. 😆 Ron
    2 points
  3. Must be Stuart Brays? I have an MDD (and MAF) Both correct, so loads of pictures. Ron
    1 point
  4. Unfortunately that what this thread is a waiting game ,I Answer questions that people ask to the best of my ability until as such time as the aprons are removed will any body know if I'm wrong or right ,I don't control what goes on at this site where their priority is to build house's on a 300 +acre site ,I wish it wasn't just as much as everybody else . Having said that I live 170 mile round trip from the place and as there is no access to the area in question there isn't much chance of seeing whether or not there is any activity near or on the aprons ,there is however a layby of sorts on the A10 mid way between the traffic lights at Denny end road and the ( going north) business park roundabout ,this layby is approx 1200 metres from the aprons ,in a few weeks the leaves will drop and one should be able to see across to the aprons , I figure that if it is what I say then they would have to mag off the spare parts that were crushed on top of the tanks ,that would require a fairly large machine which could be seen accros that distance ...layby is really only accessible traveling south as it's on a fast bend ,layby has more than it fair share of deep holes .. Apron 52 °16' 49" N. 0° 11' 21" E Layby 52° 16' 59" N 0° 10' 17" E Having dealt with this lot ,agents and Hammond I wouldn't trust them more so because of the fortunes involved ..
    1 point
  5. That looks like a casting fault to me it's not a stress crack they are more linear and run along the grain boundaries what you have is a small pit imperfection in the casting that has probably been there since manufacture. The first question I would ask is have you seen any water seeping out from there? if not my advice would be to leave it alone, certainly don't go digging around inside the pit. Pete
    1 point
  6. Your better off putting the slightest smear of Vasaline on the heel of the cam, don't use oil it can get thrown off and foul the points then all sorts of bad things can happen. The felt pad is used as it soaks up the oil and releases it slowly. If your going down this route then one drop of clean engine oil is all that is required for several thousand miles of use. As Nick points out most point systems don't use this so you'll be fine without it, just set up your points to 20 thou with feeler gauges or use a dwell metre if you have one at 32 to 34 degrees of dwell for a six cylinder engine. Once again to echo Nick's good advise do not slacken the distributor body pinch bolt and start changing the static timing if you are not confident in re-timing the engine, if it ran fine before leave it alone. Pete
    1 point
  7. Pores rather than crack I think, it'll flex every time that head bolt is tightened. Clean and cover, but don't be too hard on it as it is eighty years old. 8-) Running the cooling system unpressurised would be the thing.
    1 point
  8. Yes but not easy. The big problem is finding the extent of any crack, and if it is porosity you are limited to sealer.
    1 point
  9. Would anyone happen to have some rough dimensions -- or at least clear photographs -- of the correct 4WD sump and (ideally, but optionally!) the oil pump pickup that would go with it? I've been squinting at the 1955 (Amended 1958) manual and from the pictures given there, the oil pump appears the same as the one I have, except for the pickup tube. Now, I know I have a later engine, but the oil pump is in the same location on the engine; and the pickup I have is basically mounted directly on the bottom of the pump, whereas the diagrams given in the EMER show a much longer pickup and an oil-pan that appears to be much more square with the sump moved further forward and seemingly a good bit deeper. In summary, same volume, but with a smaller footprint. A crude digital crayon sketch -- not to scale, of course -- illustrating this, is attached below: I think, as best as I can tell, that the difference in pickup is just vertical height -- which is a relatively simple change to make -- as opposed to any fore/aft displacement. In which case, I should only need a sump! (Well, I could modify the one I have, but I'm already going to struggle to meet my self-imposed target of having the engine running by the end of the year as is! Not been in the greatest of shapes, mentally or physically, this year; and that's slowed things down.) The engine is mostly assembled by this point, though, so I'm not a million miles off; and I've got a MUST/SHOULD/COULD set of lists going. Anyway, I've also had to move all the wheels into the unit as they're no longer allowed to live outside (so sayeth the landlord) and now it's nearly impossible to move in there! So, seeing as I don't particularly want to use them, they have to go. ...the wheels, that is, not the landlord. I did try breaking one down, mostly for the experience (we don't do split-ring wheels at work) but also in the hope that I'd be able to make them compact/light enough that I could stack them onto the truck more easily; but holy crap that's a colossal pain in the behind. I do have video of me struggling... (I'd put them on par with doing a 17.5" tubeless tyre, with levers and sledgehammer. And the tyre seems to be stuck to the wheel rim with rust. I can probably free it off, but at this point, eh...) So that's 7 9.00-20s, two of which are still mounted on the truck, and one is on the bed of the truck (so that'll be exciting getting it down.), and the one I started breaking down already had a crushed valve-stem so that tube is scrap anyway, but it was still holding air; and one 11.00-20 (which is also on the truck bed.) Most of them are Duramold branded, one is a Pirelli (I think?), and the 11.00 is a Phoenix brand. They're all of unknown age, all have age-cracking, and there are a couple of cuts in the tread-blocks here and there. And they're all -- except possibly one? -- on 10-stud 335mm PCD wheels. If anyone's interested in 'em, for whatever reason, let me know! And with that, I must sign off again... Spent near enough a full day doing an EGR valve on a Transit, thanks to a rounded bolt, and now I must go sleep in order to face up to the damn thing again because it didn't fix the warning light...
    1 point
  10. Looks like a concrete block maybe? what a fascinating vehicle
    1 point
  11. It could be a crack, or a small porous spot in the block. One of the things most people don't realises just hollow pressure the cooling systems are on these engines. A new truck and radiator would have a 4psi radiator cap on it, and it would only reach that pressure when working really hard. Clean it and paint it again, maybe with some sort of sealant, then turn your radiator cap back to the first click so it is locked in place but not pressurising the radiator, and just drive it
    1 point
  12. f Fit it if you want, most distributors dont have them
    1 point
  13. I feel this thread isn’t going to go anywhere tbh. It just doesn’t add up to me.
    1 point
  14. As above post re oil to lubricate the points heel, fitting new points will not affect the ignition timing, Do not move the distributor if your not familiar with setting ignition timing
    1 point
  15. 3 in 1 drip oil is listed Halfords and most supermarkets and tool shops
    1 point
  16. Not I'm afraid how Hammond would see it not as there are multiple tens of millions in this and other sites ,tanks would be something he doesn't need ,an irritant a nuisance deficit .he and I have locked horns before ,he is a developer first and a M.P. second..
    1 point
  17. OK Lex I'll accept the free one as a token gesture of remorse for your misdemeanor. Ron
    1 point
  18. If the part is not available in the UK it would obviously be very expensive here so HMC should levy a special extra charge to bring the imported part up to the same level. Of course, the effort that you went to to go and acquire the very rare part in an unfamiliar country and ship it home proves how keen you are to get it and should be taxed too. This is called an integrated policy. David
    1 point
  19. There should be a hole just behind the back of the foot step look this photo is from a m38 jeep but is the same other side
    1 point
  20. Saw This and thought would post it for information Warning over potential car tax fines when driving in Europe this summer - how to avoid (msn.com)
    1 point
  21. I've learnt that I've a lot to learn on military vehicle restoration
    1 point
  22. I wonder what the DVLA records THIS as?!! [actually, only as a green Ford....disappointing!] Note - rear wheel has obviously been shot out at some stage - by one of those BMW Focke-Wulfs?
    1 point
  23. Hi steviem are you going the the victory show if so will bring the m43 jacket with me will be selling some parts on grahams stall
    1 point
  24. So you managed to get a NOS door then 😉
    1 point
  25. I have deleted this post as it might create offence::
    1 point
  26. Dear Ted, It was specialist maps they made; those made at Hillside were target maps and one set per aircraft on each raid. But of course I realise it was for every Group too and so that multiples the number of maps. I guess that if a Bombing Raid was split as a decoy then that increases the variations! No wonder they needed a 5 tonner!
    1 point
  27. The manifold heat control Is correctly set in the Summer Position
    1 point
  28. Hi Rosumberg, I would assume the mass x ray trailer would be painted "RAF Blue" with white text. Someone more expert than me could tell you the name of the colour. I dont know how many trailers were converted into mass x ray equipment, I dont know why the RAF converted trailers, the army used three Leyland Beavers around 1956 for the same or very similar purpose. B series
    1 point
  29. The event was meant to be on until 4pm, but most people had enough 'fun' by 3pm and started packing up. I don't think I've used the wipers that much for years. It's a shame, as previous years have had great weather and a good turnout. Still managed to catch up with some friends I'd not seen for over a year, so not all bad! I'm not doing both days at Bowes this year, as I'm off to Breighton Aerodrome in Yorkshire tomorrow, for their vintage aircraft club fly-in.
    1 point
  30. After lunch, we had a wander down to the community centre to see what was going on and spotted a nice old Land Rover outside. If Germany had invaded the UK, seeing their troops marching through our towns would have been strange. Even though they were re-enactors in 2021, it was still strange to see them marching along the main street.
    1 point
  31. While it was nice to be out, it wasn't a pleasant day out, with the heavy fret defying the forecast and remaining all day. Those who did turn out to support the railway and village made the best of it. Of course, this is England in late June, so you have to expect rain!! Some time ago, wifey had signed up on a basket weaving course for the day with a friend, so it was just my daughter and me, braving the weather with one Jeep. In past years, I only lived two miles away from the event and have taken all three vehicles and diorama gear along. Since the house move in February, I'm now about 15 miles away and with wifey busy for the day, one Jeep was all I could manage.
    1 point
  32. Bowes Railway/Springwell Village 1940's Weekend - June 26th Earlier in the week, I was planning to go to the Bowes Railway/Springwell Village 1940's event with the roof down and the Jeep in RAF markings. My RAF gear is thinner for warmer days. As we approached the weekend and the forecast said overcast, with slight showers first thing, I put the summer canvas roof on and decided to use my US Ordnance Depot magnetic markings, wearing my HBT's. I woke up this morning and looked out of the window to find I was inside a rain cloud, with heavy fret blowing sideways across the window. So the green roof came off and my checkered Follow Me roof was fitted, along with the wooden sides and doors! Several HBT layers and my flying jacket were necessary!
    1 point
  33. De coloribus et de gustibus non est disputandum! 😁
    1 point
  34. The Environment Agency are just one of the consultees in any planning application - in the case of a proposed residential redevelopment of a brown-field site, their involvement may go a bit further than for Joe Bloggs sticking up a new conservatory, but they usually simply offer an opinion on the potential impact of a development upon the natural environment. This is generally in terms of flooding, etc., but possibly in terms of disposal of contaminated soils if they've been identified by pre-development sampling. They do not have the deciding vote on anything in my experience & are regularly overruled by planners (e.g., in the case of developments that have been given permission on flood plains & the like). And yes, seeing what to us is interesting history being dug up would be something to look forward to, but to the developers & a great number of people in society at large, it's just a load of scrap, sadly. Regarding your final paragraph, this is all the more reason for the developers & planners to be upfront about all of this. The last thing they want are surprises that lead to hold-ups to their programme - groundworkers & brickies stood around twiddling their thumbs costs money. So your hints at secrecy & underhand schemes makes no sense at all - sorry.
    0 points
  35. There’s some really good repros of many things out there that get let down by the wrong screw! It surely can’t be that expensive to get the correct screw after making the effort to get the rest correct.
    0 points
  36. An old friend downsizing allowed me the privilege of rummaging through his many sheds. I managed to amass a lot of (good stuff) some of which will help with immediate restorations. The rest will more than likely sit collect dust in my sheds. 😂 But I definitely need it… Water bowser parts I turned up some nice original ww2 brass 7/8 bsp hose tails with nuts and extension unions. We spent many hours discussing where my haul came from. One of the tails that the brass fittings were just a small handful that didn’t make the scrap heap in the 50, 60 and 70s the family business was to buy sell ex military equipment. Water trucks/ bowsers were a a good sellers. Buy them cheep at dispersal auctions. Sell them high broken up. Water tanks were sold to farms for water feeders , trucks were then converted for general haulage. And sold on for a new purpose, Water trucks apparently were always good low mileage trucks. water filters/ pumps pipe work, sold for scrap. Apparently there were a few filters sold to local farms for filtering the spring water….
    0 points
  37. Certainly a nice looking truck ..... 👍
    0 points
  38. Most probably Fryderyk with the surname Zakowski or Zakrzewski😎. We had a Polish lad at college named Jerzykowski, needless to say we all called him Jerseycowski.
    0 points
  39. John F: I'll put something together - a short summary which will fit the bits into the jigsaw as far as Poles fighting in the West were concerned. Rootes 75: Yes, the reason there was such a large Polish diaspora in Britain after the war was because many were unable or unwilling to go back to Poland as it was now under Communist control and those who had fought with the Western Allies were deemed suspect (at best!). Many, of course, were from the east of the then Poland which was also no longer Poland, but the Ukraine as the borders had shifted westwards. So many settled in the areas of Britain where they had been based during the war - particularly in Scotland and also in Wales where many bought cheap smallholdings and began a new life.
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  40. Luckily I get 5 x 23kg Baggage allowance as I’m doing 3 months. I also have some container space thank god. Parts are cheaper and more readily available here
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  41. Could well be. And, yes, it's very likely the girls are airwomen and the boys airmen. Great photo and full of interesting detail. I don't want to rabbit on on this thread, but one last observation - back in 2003, I think it was, the Polish Navy sent an M28 Bryza maritime recce aircraft to the Royal International Air Tattoo at Fairford. They painted it in the colours of a WWII Polish Air Force Wellington of Coastal Command, complete with codes and RAF roundels - it looked brilliant!
    0 points
  42. I have to try repairing mine so I am taking some notes and tips!
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  43. Excelente proyecto de restauración para este Westland mk-2. Se trata de uno de los 4 helicópteros adquiridos por el Ejército del Aire en la década de 1950 y de los que solo quedan 3, esta unidad y los otros dos del Museo del Aire de Madrid. El resto de los comprados fueron todos Sikorsky. S-55 38.000€
    0 points
  44. So you see Stableboy, I was right....I told you there would be someone on here who would know for sure what your collimator was for...even if it took ten years to get the answer! Now you just need a Centurion to fit it to. 😊
    0 points
  45. Speedo unwrapped and reassembled today. Refitted to the dash. Everything else looks decidedly shabby now so did a little bit of cleaning. Much better. Just the other six gauges to clean and paint the bezels on. I replaced all the mounting screws on the dash and heater controls. Does any one have a supplier for the textured paint used on the dash and heater controls? The heater controls have lost most of their paint over the years. And cleaned all the bolts from the props, chassis and gearbox in readiness for its reassembly. And that's as much as I have achieved today.
    0 points
  46. I was chatting to an engineer the other day and we were discussing the lock down, he had been speaking to a friend of his who was fed up of the lock down, the engineer asked him what he had learnt in the last 6 months, his friend said nothing. The engineer said he felt his friend had not thought properly. I said I had learnt to refurbish stoves, learnt to change the oil on a land rover and soldering, yes simple things so thought it might be a good topic to start.
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  47. Today’s progress report My task for today was to repair the top of the frame and fit a new door skin, or so I thought 🤔 I decided to do a dry run and fit the door to see if it actually still fitted before anymore repairs were done, obviously I was being optimistic thinking it would fit like a glove……wrong 🤨 Some serous fettling was required to the hinges, this involved a vice and big hammer!! After a couple of hours adjusting the fit was pretty good. Now it was time to repair the top of the frame. This tea bag turned out to be a bit fiddly as I didn’t want to loose the shape of the skin around the window. cut away each section until I got to a workable shape. Out came the angle iron again to form the bend, now this might sound obvious but I used a rubber mallet to bent the steel instead of the usual club hammer, not sure why I’ve never used it before but it doesn’t leave the odd hammer mark that the club does. The repair section was made up from two angle bits of steel and spot welded. Finished with a bead of seam sealer to tidy up the dodgy welding. The new door skin will now have to wait until next week. Lastly…thank you to Eddie1983 for coming up with a NOS mirror arm 👍
    0 points
  48. Just returned from my 476 mile round trip to the show. A very interesting & convivial weekend blessed with dry weather. Many thanks to the SOE Club members for giving so much of their time & effort to bring this all together. Looking forward to next year, although I imagine that is only 9 months away? Very shrewd idea to have had this secondary fallback date.
    0 points
  49. Some sandblasted parts ... And some primed parts ... Looks like a store where you can choose the items you wish 😄 Not much to discuss I guess?
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