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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/23/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi Rosumberg, I would assume the mass x ray trailer would be painted "RAF Blue" with white text. Someone more expert than me could tell you the name of the colour. I dont know how many trailers were converted into mass x ray equipment, I dont know why the RAF converted trailers, the army used three Leyland Beavers around 1956 for the same or very similar purpose. B series
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  2. Think you are right. Here a pic from the Fondation Berliet.
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  3. Hi Pete, As you probably know, there is a Leyland Retriver for sale on Ebay at the moment. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/393275435377?hash=item5b910ae971:g:erMAAOSw7WBgiRlI&mkevt=1&mkcid=1&mkrid=709-53476-19255-0&campid=5336904490&toolid=10001&customid=ksokvr44xw001j83007hw The seller helpfully gives a picture of his data plate layout. He too is missing the plate upper left. Perhaps, since neither vehicles has it's original body, it was a body plate? Best Regards, Adrian PS, I do enjoy the restorartion work you are carrying out on this early WW2 British truck, thanks for sharing it. Photo Credit: Smiling-Jack-D.
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  4. Leyland Retriever WW11 / War Time Lorry https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/393275435377?hash=item5b910ae971:g:erMAAOSw7WBgiRlI
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  5. Thanks Gents. I must say I am pleased with how the bike is turning out, Lex I think several of the parts on this bike came from you 😉 Dare I say it really just the tank and electrics left 🤗 The tank is taking up far more time than I anticipated but I want to get it right……
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  6. Meanwhile back at the airfield.... An earlier attempt to fit the foot pedal shaft and connect up the steering, ended in abject failure, due to a missing end cap in the case of the steering gear, and a complete refusal to fit by the pedal shaft. I returned to base defeated, to ponder the problems. It turned out I had assembled the pedal shaft components incorrectly, so that was an easy fix. The missing end cap was machined from solid by Mike Lewenden on the CNC mill. (see previous posts.) Armed with these improvements, I returned to the fray, and this time everything fitted correctly, to my considerable relief. I treated myself to a short spell in the driving settle, watching the front wheels turning under the control of the new steering wheel. Not too much mind, as such practices are specifically forbidden in the drivers manual ! Elsewhere, the reduced head bolts for the exhaust caps have been turned out by Mike and fitted in their respective holes. The rest of my time recently has been taken up with work projects, which has to be a priority at the moment.
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  7. More progress at last! I have started on the castings. I gave the bottom tank a skim to square it up. Then a skim across the joint face. The foundry had been concerned about shrinkage and so had made the flange extra thick and I had to take 1/4" off it. It all machined ok though. It is an awkward thing to hold but I managed to skim the water outlets and drill and tap for the studs. The main tube plate holes and the spigots remain. To turn the spigots, I have driven in some mahogany plugs and have centred them ready for turning. Ijust need to find a big lathe now! I started on the top tank this morning. Again, it is a most cussing awkward thing to hold. I could only grab the end flanges but although big, the casting is quite thin and not very strong forcing me to take only very light cuts. Why is it that no matter how big your machine tools may be, you can always find something a bit bigger than it is intended to work! The table does not have quite enough stroke so I had to machine the tank only so far before rotating the milling head to the other side of the centre line to catch the last four inches of the casting. Irksome but it all worked very well and remained aligned. I have drilled and tapped for the filler neck. As you can see, the casting is a bit shy of metal and could have done with another 1/8" on the boss diameter. I shall have to remember that for next time. It doesn't look out of the way, fortunately. Tube plate flange holes next. We should be back on the road in no time now! Steve 🙂
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  8. Today’s progress report My task for today was to repair the top of the frame and fit a new door skin, or so I thought 🤔 I decided to do a dry run and fit the door to see if it actually still fitted before anymore repairs were done, obviously I was being optimistic thinking it would fit like a glove……wrong 🤨 Some serous fettling was required to the hinges, this involved a vice and big hammer!! After a couple of hours adjusting the fit was pretty good. Now it was time to repair the top of the frame. This tea bag turned out to be a bit fiddly as I didn’t want to loose the shape of the skin around the window. cut away each section until I got to a workable shape. Out came the angle iron again to form the bend, now this might sound obvious but I used a rubber mallet to bent the steel instead of the usual club hammer, not sure why I’ve never used it before but it doesn’t leave the odd hammer mark that the club does. The repair section was made up from two angle bits of steel and spot welded. Finished with a bead of seam sealer to tidy up the dodgy welding. The new door skin will now have to wait until next week. Lastly…thank you to Eddie1983 for coming up with a NOS mirror arm 👍
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  9. Some sandblasted parts ... And some primed parts ... Looks like a store where you can choose the items you wish 😄 Not much to discuss I guess?
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  10. I agree. Restoration or fabrication can look like a hill too big to climb. Good luck.
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  11. In truth very slowly. I seem to have lost all my energy and drive, my joints hurt and I blame the Covid injection that I had on April the 1st. I have always been physically hard on my body, so I have the odd aches and pains but after the injection, every joint hurt and at 55 you should be able to get off the bog without pushing yourself off the seat. Thankfully it's calmed down now and I am only having problems with my left knee but I feel knackered. That said I have made some progress with the tank but I find myself making silly mistakes which has entailed doing things twice to get it right. Whinge over. As mentioned last time, I have been making the drivers vision telescope. It's quite a complex little item and it took me quite a long time to decide what does what and how it all works. The pictures that I have, at first glance, hold very little information but if you stare at them long enough it all becomes clear. Basically there's a main casting, of course mines a fabrication. The casting is attached to a top plate that slides into the location rails and is attached to the vision hole blanking block via a threaded bar. In the location rail there are two location holes, one positioned so that when the periscope is not required the blanking block covers the vision holes and one that aligns the periscope with the vision holes. To release the assembly, so that it can be slid one way or the other, you press the lever on the side of the casting in, this lowers a sprung loaded plunger. The assembly can then be slid across and the plunger will then locate into the relevant hole. Because our eyes are not the same distance apart, person to person, there is an adjuster that would allow the vision tubes to be adjusted to suit the user. This is attached to the lower part of the casting and contains a thumb screw attached to a threaded bar, one end is threaded with a left hand thread and the other with a right hand thread. If the thumb screw is turned one way the adjusters move apart, if turned in the opposite direction, the adjusters move closer and when the vision tubes are assembled into the casting, this adjusts the distance between the eye pieces. Attached to the front cover of the assembly, there is a split boss with a tightening screw. When the vision tubes are assembled into the casting there is a brow rest that fits into this split boss and the screw is there to lock, said rest, in place. The last items of note are the two curved plates on the inside of the front cover, these act as springs and they hold the vision tubes in place when they are assembled into the casting. That's all folks. Jon
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