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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi Ted, thanks for the pics. Unfortunately it has the model B 4 cylinder engine. 4 tons and 52 BHP is not an ideal driving experience (apart from economy). I’ve had a shot of the V8 engined heavy unit (the late Mick Paul’s) when I took a trip down to Cannock in 1993 (drove the 7V all the way down there and back!). ATB Peter
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  2. As always there are lots of different views on what owners should or should not do with their vehicles. It's a shame that as a community we can't agree that the preservation of vehicles is the key objective, what colour they are and how they are displayed is secondary. While I might prefer originality, if the choice is to ensure a vehicle survives or is lost/scrapped because an owner won't compromise on originality then, in my own opinion, survival wins. The other aspect I find upsets me is the language used. Having a healthy debate about areas that are subjective or where the information isn't readily available is good. Proffering information in a constructive and helpful way is great. Use of language such as 'disappointing' (we all know what a British persons means when they use that phrase), "vague resemblance' is scant praise and 'better research' is all very negative and while it may not be intended to offend it's not the sort of language that will build bridges. So thank you to all those who are spending their time, money and effort to preserve our history, whatever paint is used on the end result. Regards, Julian
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  3. Possibly you should address your query to Dominic Cummins who seems to make up the vehicle 'lockdown' rules as he motors around the English countryside ?
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  4. Two Bofors still for sale,one British build, the other Canadian,left and right respectively in the photos. Tim Lane Ripley Derbys 07936 048802.
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  5. Just to refresh your memory- Here is your FYY160; I took the shots in front of Hanger 56, now I think this could well be 1993 or 1994 as my old office in the 1917 wooden hut has gone. I can't remember who owned the ambulance. I don't think it was Jimmy Wood's as his had an ex ministry reg GLU** or similar reg number. Take care TED
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  6. Martin, Well done with your efforts, they are most impressive. I have a friend who is a guru on Fodens. I have asked him if I can give you his e-mail address. I believe that the Army changed some of the Fodens to have Fuller gear-boxes which are much easier to acquire. I would recommend an RTO 14613. However, I expect that you would like to keep it original. When we first had a 22,000 litre wheeler TTF at 240 Sqn at Barnet we were told to drive it in a very odd way. We were told to single declutch changing up and to use the clutch brake when changing up. We must have had to double declutch changing down. I NEVER got good results. When I went on my driving instructor's course at Leconfield, the instructor first demonstrated driving the vehicle. I expressed surprise that he was double declutching changing up. He said "of course, it is a constant mesh gear-box". At Leconfield we were trained to go up through he gears to the fourth gear position, double D all the time, when in fourth move the paddle to high range and then change up and into the first gear pos. When in the fourth gear position in high range, move the paddle to overdrive. To get overdrive it was only necessary to press the clutch momentarily. We would then generally pre-select high. When the speed fell away for whatever reason, we would only need to dip the clutch to come out of overdrive. The interesting bit is what we were trained to do next. If the gradient was making us change down we would go down through the gears in the normal way and on a decent hill it is better to change down two gears at a time. When negotiating a hazard such as a roundabout we were trained to come out of overdrive at an early point, pres-select low, get the speed right right down using the service brakes, when the speed was low enough, dip the clutch. This would cause the box to range change from 8th gear (4th pos, high range) to 4th gear (4th gear low range). This was a really good system of driving as it avoided lots of pointless down shifts and allowed you to concentrate on finding a gap in the traffic and avoid stopping. Of course, 4th gear was ideal for negotiating the roundabout. Note that overdrive has to be pre-selected when going into it and coming out. John
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  7. My partner and I have different addresses. He is the keeper and owner of his car but does not have a driving licence. I am insured as the main driver and give my London address although the car is kept at his address which is 30 miles away. I drive the car when visiting and it has a low mileage. Increasingly insurers are reluctant to quote and the one that will has bumped up the premium every year.
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  8. my feeling is the dvla only need to know the address of the owner not where the vehicle is kept. They do this so they can keep Track and inform owner and relevent authorities when there is need to contact owner. Nobody gives a toss where the vehicle is even the insurance companies only ask is it stored in a garage not were
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