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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/23/2021 in all areas

  1. Robert with the deepest of respect take a deep breath and go and sit in the shade old friend Best regards Pete
    2 points
  2. Thanks for all your help and advice. I will always make sure I carry plenty of water to try and cool things down. Maybe we should all park our military vehicles up through the summer and only take them out when its snowing!
    1 point
  3. Hi. I think (hope) we are a long way from this, reason I say this that the they have been exploring electric conversion for large trucks were the are using the entire engine compartment for a replace/swap battery pack. The problem has been really poor range 500-600 kilometers on a charge. My bet is that the pressure to get old cars off the road will come in the form of changing the gasoline to the point were it will not work with carburetors. My backup plan has been to convert to propane. Having said this, electric cars can be fun. My brother started building solar and battery powered vehicles more than 25 years ago. He built an electric hill climb racer that was an absolute hoot to drive. Cheers Phil
    0 points
  4. A common problem of vehicles dying in warm weather, no one ever thinks to check the position of the exhaust manifold hot spot, it probably is set in the Winter position so in summer overheats the inlet manifold and causes vapour locks, they often can be difficult to reset as they seize up in the manifold
    0 points
  5. If I did it, I would want to leave the clutch and gearbox in place to maintain as much of the original driving experience as possible. Most MV's would loose much of their driving character with just a whine and brake pedal.
    0 points
  6. There have been a few productive evenings this week, firstly the clutch pull cylinder was overhauled. Stripped Cleaned New O rings selected Reassembled The manual says to avoid any oil contamination of the bonded seal which is the tapered seal in the centre. So this was left dry and the bore of the cylinder lightly lubricated with rubber grease. This way it will lubricate the O ring and keep the seal dry. Lastly made a new gasket. Next day went back to the crane leg and persuaded it back to its fully stowed position. Chain pullers are very handy things. Finally on day 3 and 4 I've refitted the heaters. Applied the foam seals which are two different thicknesses as the heaters are not quite flat. Not an error that's just how they are! And refitted to the cab with new air hoses. Re connected the wiring and all the control cables. Then cut some new coolant hoses. Next job is to drain the coolant again and reconnect them. Also hay has been made on the farm which means big open spaces.... VID-20210718-WA0003.mp4 Still find gear changing akin to juggling. I'm used to double declutching but the clutch brake takes more concentration. You have to really think not to push the pedal all the way down. I'm still not happy with the range change yet. Changes from low to high fine but makes a meal of changing down, with a fair bit of grinding. Not sure if this is operator error, wear from when the selector wasn't fuctioning pre rebuild or an air pressure fault. There does seem to be residual air pressure which in my mind should be exhausted from the clutch pull cylinder. Unfortunately the air system diagrams only cover the brakes so I'm going to have to do some pipe tracing to see what's connected to what. But according to the words only the range change and clutch air assist should be connected to the pull cylinder. Five days to an Mot slot if I can get it all together in time. The count down begins.
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  8. Thanks Barry. You must have a bit of old blue rope. I don't think it comes in any other colour! Thoughts have turned to tappets and followers. Fortunatey, Father started on the job some time ago by cleaning them up. Unfortunately, some of the tappets were pretty poor. And two of the followers had seen better days as well. Dad set to and turned up a new set of tappets. Which I case hardened and quenched in oil. The remainder cleaned up nicely. But two of the followers definitely needed replacing. The axle for the roller was trapped by a cross-ways pin which I drilled out before pushing the axle out. The oil way arrangement is interesting. This hangs down inside the crank case so splashed oil can run in. I turned up two new rollers from silver steel and then hardened them before reassembling. Unfortunately, the axle was a bit tight and when I pushed it in, there was a 'snick' and a broken roller. Bother! I turned up another with a bigger hole in the middle and set about reassembling it. The pin was secured by riveting over. Ready for reinstatement! Cleaned the tappets and fitted Father's new nuts. Back in the engine! And fixed down with another load of UNS nuts made by Father. Time to think about the blocks. Steve 🙂
    0 points
  9. To be honest, any photos posted here are likely to be pretty meaningless. The colour in the images themselves is subject to a huge range of variables to start with, and is likely to have changed as the image has aged. Even if the image colour is accurate, the colour fidelity still has to be preserved in the scanning and digitising process, and even if that's OK, the colour you actually see depends on your computer's graphics and display settings. Add to that the variation in original colours batch to batch, maker to maker and so on, the same variation in repro materials, and subjective factors like the light you're viewing the sample in, your eyes, that colours look darker on a small sample than a large area, and so on ...
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