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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Insulate the fuel line, make sure you have the heat shield in place above the pump. I have idly wondered if reproducing the heat shield in stainless may not make it work a bit better than the original mild steel.
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  2. It could be a good idea to pressure test the fuel line, a friend of mine had exactly the same symptoms on his Dodge, after overhauling the fuel pump to no avail he fitted an electric fuel pump. When he turned the ignition on a very fine jet of petrol shot out of the fuel pipe, the hole was so small it was virtually impossible to see. After replacing the fuel pipe and removing the electric pump it still runs fine.
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  3. Keith, don't use copper for the fuel pipes as they absorb heat, used steel pipes and if any pipes are in the vicinity of the exhaust manifold used an insulating lagging material. Years ago I did this on my Bedford with asbestos string obtained from a hardware shop in deepest Normandy, it did the trick.
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  4. And the crane manufacturers are Les Ateliers de Bondy, Seine, who seem to have produced quite a range of machinery, much of it self-propelled. No idea on the chassis, though.
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  5. It's a firm from Arras Travaux Publics ?????? & Fils.
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  6. Guys, Yes, I regularly correspond with Mike Starmer and we both agree that seeing a colour photo of a British & Commonwealth Army truck or non-armoured type from WW2 is very rare and often corrupted by the type of colour film but here are some from my collection showing the early G3 / G4 scheme used before SCC.2; This line up of the first Canadian troops to be posted to the UK and I believe they date from 1940. Most of the Canadian CMPs are equipped with CMP 11 Cabs and Bedford & Morris vehicles with aero screens etc Last is an ambulance which I can only guess is in SSC.2 from an unknown date, that shows SCC.2 was mostly brown with a touch of green to it. It was a gift from the Canadian Red Cross.
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  7. I love the bit of old blue rope! I am sure all of us have a bit just the same that has done similar duty, either lifting or holding down precious parts. The milling machine looks just the job, something that you needed years ago.
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  8. We both managed to get down this weekend so we took the opportunity to turn the engine over. Now the flywheel was in place, it was just too much to manhandle. The engine hangs from its mounts so they had to be fitted before we could put it in its stand. Tim blocked it up so we could insert the bolts. In the mean time, Father had cleaned up and painted the pivot casting. This went in with the repaired bolts without a hitch. Then the other end which also went well. When the mount had been removed, we noticed that a lock nut was missing. I picked a nut to copy and sketched for Dad who made a new one. Unfortunately, one of the nuts was a joker and slightly bigger AF. Of course, I picked that one to copy! Oh well. The new nut works OK and matches the joker so all was not lost. 5/8"x16tpi UNS this time. We have spent a fortune on new taps and dies but at least they are all sharp! Front mount pivots on a plain pin. And into the stand where we can do some real work! Dad has made up the three replacement studs with the large thread, the oversize thread and a standard one. They fitted nicely. Push rods, tappets and blocks next. Progress at last! Steve 🙂
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  9. The engine beckons! I have just had a nice weekend in Devon and we have made some good progress. We got the crank case up on the stand and Dad carried on with the cleaning. This engine mount bracket remained. It is secured with two bolts with round heads. To secure them the bolts have 'feathers' drilled into the head. The first bolt undid. You can see the feather under the head. The second broke off which presented an interesting challenge as the heads are counterbored into the crank case. The solution was to cut a slot in the end of the bolt so that it could be held with a screwdriver whilst turning the nut. Much to my relief, this worked! The feather is 1/8" diameter, drilled straight through the head. Casting removed and another cleaning and painting job to do! The oil pump hangs on four bosses on the side of the crank case. One stud was present, one missing, one boss had a stripped thread and the last boss, a lump missing from the casting. Fortunately, the casting is thick enough just there that I could drill and tap it deeper ready for an extended stud. The thread was tricky, of course. 3/8" x 18tpi UNS just to trip us up! The stripped thread was simply tapped oversize. With the crank case looking good, it was time to look at fitting the crankshaft. First stop, the bearing caps which had a piece of felt laid into them to seal against the sump. Looking good! The moment of truth. Looking good but what about the timing? Good thinking Dad. Fortunately, the gears are well marked. Caps were nutted and tightened and the crank shaken to see if there was any play. Fortunately, there was no radial movement at all so we simply tightened them right up and pinned them. Unfortunately, two nuts were missing but we did find a pair of replacements, 1/2" x16tpi UNS just to keep us on our toes! The engine mount bolts were all designed with feathers but most were missing or loose and needed some attention. New bits of rod and some Loctite did the trick. Making sure that the corresponding holes were clean.
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  10. I'm beginning to suspect it is ROF Radcliffe as well.
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  11. Hi A major milestone today, first time out of the "shed" under her own steam IMG_7276.MOV Did manage to get to 20mph round one of the tracks... well pleased... plenty still to do Cheers Richard
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