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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/24/2021 in all areas

  1. From Wiki: In 1913 they (David Brown) established a joint venture in America with Timken for Radicon worm drive units.
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  2. OK, thanks! I think the valves were open on these models, you can see it in the second picture. Lex
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  3. Little more progress last night. Few more hours on building the hoses up. Really pleased with the final results.
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  4. John, I still used the children I just equipped them with angle grinders. Much quicker. 🀣🀣
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  5. I always thought red was the fastest.πŸ€£πŸ˜‚πŸ€£ But: de gustibus non disputandum.πŸ€” Pawel
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  6. The bloke got carried away with the yellow paint on the valve springs😝 Ron
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  7. A day off work, the rubbing down, de-greasing and wire brushing of the chassis complete so we spent the day giving the Commer a good coat of primer. It always gives a good feeling getting some paint on!
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  8. I forgot to add photos of U-pipes for Triumph. And repaired petrol tap for Quick with new cork seal. Lex, I d'nt forget. 😁 Thank you. Pawel
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  9. While working with the Triumph fuel system, I reconstructed the fuel pipes in my NSU 501OSL and Quick to their original condition. The big NSU lights up and works. There is a problem with gear shifting (adjustment). Quick needs a little more work. Regards Pawel
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  10. Mike, although I have a mountain of stuff unpacked from a recent house move, the boxes with the Short 25 material were miraculously near the top, so I can answer your questions and clarify a couple of my observations made above. Firstly, the shield against the wall is indeed for a 17 Pr. Consulting the list of observed examples, there was a consistent dislocation of three between Registered number and Production number in the Mk.I carriages, eg, Rego A26 has production number A29 and Rego A 104 has a production number of A107. As for the "improved prototypes", the Rego and production numbers were the same, at least up to A8. It is pretty clear that the Rego and production numbering of the officially accepted Mk.I carriage continued directly from the "improved Prototypes", so presumably the first rego number for the Mk.I carriage would have been A13 by that reckoning. At what point the dislocation between Rego and production numbers happened I don't know, but Rego A15 had production number A19, and Rego A26 has production number A29. My reference to the discrepancy in the improved prototypes was poor recollection abetted by one of the data plates on Rego A8 bearing the inscription "No.11". This was the saddle designation number rather than a production number. On that basis, it looks like there may have been some kerfuffle around the last of the improved prototypes and the first of the production model Mk.Is. The simple explanation is that three guns produced by the factory were not accepted into service and therefore not registered. What guns could these have been? Well, I don't know, but I would have a couple of suggestions, being the high saddle model and maybe the one using Beaufort aircraft wheels. As far as production chronology goes, Rego 22's recoil block is dated 20 March 1943 and Rego A 104 is definitely a Mk.I carriage with its recoil block is dated 20 Sep 1944. The earliest Mk.2 carriage I have listed is Rego A139 with a production number of B23. If Mk.2 production kicked off at Rego A113 and production number B1, then that is sort of in the ballpark. However, the Rego vs production number correlation, such as it is, becomes really scrappy and out of sequence. I have confirmed that the Mk.II carriage Rego 224 has the recoil block for gun Rego A225. as this would appear to be the number applied by the Army / MGO(?) then it would seem that there was at least 225 Short 25s accepted. Going back to the transition period between the improved prototypes and the accepted production Mk.I, there was a lot going on in terms of converging the prototype design to the production design. More later...
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  11. Well, Dad has had an exciting day. He has been to the foundry to pick up the castings! Here are a few shots for your interest: Time for a trip down south to pick them up and get the machining in progress. It is time we got the lorry back on the road. I feel a lot of polishing coming on! Steve 😁
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