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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/26/2021 in all areas

  1. It's coming along really well and really quickly. It wont be long before you're out on the road reporting on your own adventures!
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  2. stumbled across this today. the farmer thinks it is a 1900 Nottingham tram.
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  3. Greetings all. I'm Les, an aging gearhead from London, now based in the Philippines after a lifetime working in different parts of Asia. I care for and operate a 1988 Mitsubishi J23GN, which is descended from the Willys CJ3B that went into production in Japan in 1953 and continued in various forms until 1998. As a nipper I did a lot of work on and mucking about in a Series 2A Land Rover and decided to play with something similarly primitive before I get too tired and sore to row my own gears. Question: Why is that only the Germans, among the Axis powers, get their own sub-section on the forum? Perhaps amend that to 'Axis Power vehicles', or add the Japanese motors with their own sub-forum? No, that's not me in the photo, and no, you can't have her phone number!
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  4. Nice it has finally arrived!
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  5. There is a better Champ than that for sale in South Australia
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  6. Well I did see this precious on Facebook, but I'd be mad 🤔
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  7. I know i have put this up before but thought would give another try. I’m looking for any parts related to the Scammell pioneer tank transporter trailer TRCU, any condition even if only any good for a pattern . I have found some parts that I have added a few photos of, and I have also added some screen shots of the pathé training film that show some of the other parts I’m trying to source. I still believe there must be a trailer out there somewhere.
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  8. Back up to the Tanker today, needed to get a few measurements for a colleague who is scratch building a tanker model. I was supposed to do that that yesterday and failed again too. Did give me the chance to take that dashboard photo and check mileage too. As you can see 139 on the trip now, so 113 miles done yesterday. Tank gauge shows we used about a quarter, which would be about 12 gallons. So "about" 9.5 mpg. Just as the handbook suggests. Having said there were no issues yesterday, she looks like this today Couple of spots of oil, not to much to worry about, but a significant and persistent coolant drip, which does need worrying about. Looks like it is coming from a hose on the water pump, so hopefully just a jubilee clip that needs tightening. Will get a better look next week when I am better dressed for crawling under the thing.
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  9. It was sunny during the trip there and back and moderately warm while there having coffee. By late afternoon, we started to loose the heat from the sun, so it got a bit finger numbing on the way home. The tail gunner took most of the pictures on the trip.
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  10. Thursday was warm. I took a day off work to get some jobs done and also got a coat of green on the inside of the bulkhead. This weekend was a fun job that I've been looking forward to, but before I talk about that, I have to turn the clock back. Here's the throttle and advance and retard controls. They comprise concentric 1/2" and 5/8" mild steel tubes, the outer of which is the ignition, the inner being the throttle. I cannot now remember when I repaired them but it was long before I had thought about writing this account, so sadly there are no photographs. The outer tube was so badly rusted that it needed to be replaced. The crank on the end is a curious shape, designed to snake around the steering column. Ideally I would have held this and bored out the old tube, but I couldn't get a purchase on it. Instead, I held the tube in the 4 jaw chuck on the Harrison and carefully bored the tube out. I had managed to source new steel tubing, so I cut and faced a length of 5/8" tubing and turned a brass plug to go up the end. A 4" nail was just the right diameter to pass through the rivet holes so after drilling the holes through the tube and the plug, I pinned everything together with a nail before silver soldering the parts together. The nail was then cut off short and both ends peened over. Next it went back in the lathe to be drilled and bored out. When it came to the throttle tube, whilst the top had rusted off at quadrant height, the rest didn't look too bad. We do a lot of high purity plumbing at work and have a rather natty orbital welder, normally used on 316L stainless steel. Stuart very kindly experimented with the weld parameters using short test pieces of the new metal, sectioning each one afterwards to gauge the quality of the weld. Then I cut the rusty end off the throttle tube and faced the ends in the lathe. Then we did a test weld of new metal to old metal, using the off-cut, before finally doing the repair. It was worth all the messing about to save another original part. and there's the weld, just below the part number. So this weekend has seen the trial fitting of these parts. First task was to account for the length of the throttle tube. then the ignition tube The detent doesn't touch the quadrant for a couple of possible reasons: 1) the lever is bent 2) the detent is rusted. I know that the levers are bent. I heated them in the forge and straightened them as best I could but didn't want to break them, so quit before that point. They look a lot better now than they did! Anyway, back to the story... I drilled out the rusted detent and turned a new one, filing the flats by hand. I fitted it with some of that magic riveting solution, that comes in small red plastic bottles, so I didn't end up with the flats pointing the wrong way before peening the end over. The throttle tube has a slot cut across it to clear the clamping bolt in the lever. and that's about it for the time being. Need to wait for the paint to dry before I can get any further...
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  11. It's been a bit of a nightmare to collate, but here's my first attempt at a timeline for the North African campaign. Feedback and corrections welcome as ever. If anyone can shed any more light on the 4th and 7th Armoured Brigades in 1940-41 I'd be very grateful, as I'm sure the 7th and 8th Hussars couldn't be in two places at once! Apologies for the enormous image size. You might have to open them in a new tab to view them properly. Middle East - Armoured Divisions
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  12. After several checks of the dimensions I drilled the radiator side tank castings for the mounting holes and then tried fitting it to the chassis. There is still some adjustment to be done and some more checks before drilling the tube plates.
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  13. I have a S-J53, Mitsubishi, version of the 1953 Willys. I have found Amayama to be very reliable. Also as in previous post it is worth searching internet for alternative parts. I found a 45 amp alternator in the UK. Saved a fortune on getting one from Japan. Also my stop lights and starter solenoid are 24v Land Rover ones. If it works :). Not so good if you want to keep it absolutely original.
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  14. Hi! It's only me... Sorry I've not posted for a while - been busy with other things. Hopefully many of you have been able to get on with your own projects too. I don't know about you but I'm getting completely muddled by dates and times. Turns out these pictures date from April last year when lock-downs were still a novelty and the government's furlough scheme was paying David 80% of his salary to stay home and work on the Leyland subsidy lorry. This is the lower near-side panel which, when folded out, forms a working platform. The timbers were mostly in good reusable condition and cleaned up nicely with some wire brushing. The bottom plank had some rot, but we decided to repair rather than replace in order to retain the witness mark where the serial number plate had once been. The rotten wood was chiselled out and a repair patch glued in. We managed to save the outer surface with it's 100 years of weathered patina - this would have been near impossible to try and recreate. Meanwhile some bad screw holes were repaired by drilling them out and glueing dowels in the enlarged holes. This is where a steel edging strip is fitted to protect the timber from wear. Next, the panel was masked either side of the hinges with thick polythene in preparation for sand blasting. Quick coat of red oxide primer on the exposed metal before the panel was brought into the workshop for painting. This is one of the side reinforcing strips. I'd read about "Best" and "Double Best" steel in Professor Jamieson's textbook on steam and steam engines, but had not seen the mark before... After painting up to top coat, the stencils were marked out through a paper template before being hand painted. Underneath the word "Workshop" should be the serial number. Until such time as the brass plate turns up, this will have to remain blank. Finally, once the paint was hard, the panel was man-handled into place in preparation for the painting of the inside. And that fairly well brings us up to date. I have enjoyed writing this; I hope you've all enjoyed reading it. Doc.
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  15. Haven't been near the old Tanker for the last few weeks, what with naff weather and I had a few domestic issues to attend to, like decorating, and laying a block paving path in the garden, so getting back to it today was good news all round. Been planning a good run out for a while, we've done a couple of short trips, but a real jaunt out to shake down any faults and just drive the thing was what was required. So, early start, half seven on site, quick check round, oil, coolant etc and fire up. Like a good old British truck, she did puff a bit at first, but to be fair it was a tad fresh at that hour. She still started first turn no trouble Air built up, smoke cleared, two dozen buses moved out of the way, and we can squeeze through the gap and venture out. Check speedo and fuel gauge before leaving, just over 3/4 of a tank full and 26 miles on the trip. First priority after getting out, find somewhere for breakfast. Both the two normal haunts were shut, so ended up 30 mile into our run at Munns Buns in Sittingbourne. Nice bit of scoff though, highly recommended. For those who may be interested, our route took us from Swanley on the A20 towards Maidstone, A249 up to Sittingbourne then A2 through to Canterbury. Right turn here onto the A28 down to Ashford. Stopped in a layby just outside Canterbury, to change driver. I'd done an hour and a half by then, time for our Stuart to have a turn. With him at the wheel we continued down to the end of A28, past Ashford, Tenterden, and Rolvenden. Right onto the A268 through Hawkhurst and into Sussex at Flimwell. Tea stop here, and top marks to Stuarts other half, she sent him out with a box of sausage rolls. They went down well with a brew. With me now back in the hot seat it was up the A21 onto the M25 and back into Swanley. Once parked up back at base, I was supposed to take a second photo of the dashboard for the mileage and fuel consumption and have to admit I failed badly. The last time I can remember looking at it the trip showed 131, so we had covered 105 miles. So whole journey was a bit more than that. As for issues, nothing serious. Tickover wants raising a fraction to be more comfortable. Tracking needs doing, front tyres are feathering a bit, and the steering doesn't feel "quite" right. No.2 axle brakes aren't working as hard as No.3, but after 100+ miles I guess they have bedded in somewhat, so bit of adjustment required. No major dramas, and she drives very well, not as racy as the timber tractor, but that is understandable, she is longer and heavier, and a bit slower away from the lights. Top speed is good (for a Militant) and plenty of power on the uphill bits I did do a short vid of our Stu negotiating Ashford, hope he forgives me for including the bit with the filter light. Best watched with sound turned right up 😁! She makes a lovely noise
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  16. I have the above vehicle and am trying to get it appraised and am interested in putting it on show somewhere if anyone can help... I believe it’s the last of it kind in a fully restored and working order.
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  17. engine is coming along now waiting for the parts come back from the blasters then its finish the engine and rebuild the gear boxes
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  18. I needed a replacement primary lift pump earlier this year Yokohama quoted $178 plus courier shipping (I dont need the part in 3 days) who then declare the package to Customs ,so duty and VAT have to be paid , the best part is the courier company then put in a further charge for organising Customs clearance . End of rant anyway after a bit of running around I found a motor factors who know what they are selling ? result new primary pump for €12.50
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  19. Hi Les, coincidentally there is one from the Colt Car Company Heritage fleet in an auction this month, £12.8k atm.
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  20. An interesting picture of the hanging and cooling room of the Co-operative Bacon Factory. It did strike me though, that the bacon had little choice but to be cooperative.
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  21. last video i took off the trip about 1 mile from jason's and the end of a fantastic 2 day trip. going to be running 2 Diamond's loaded to Capel military show in september with a sherman and a morris armoured car. also taking jason's diamond to goodwood this year with sherman so loads more vids and pics to come. WP_20210410_14_23_58_Pro.mp4
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  22. The strange radiator protector on the McGhie's K type was not a one off as seen on the Whitbread's K type subsidy model.
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  23. unfortunately not all dreams have happy endings. You can see the ROPS was ripping out by the end, that was after 3 and a half rolls
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