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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/07/2021 in all areas

  1. Reminds me of the Father Ted episode where he damaged the prize car for the raffle and then attempted to tap out the dent.
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  2. Seen on that YouTube: Possibly some interesting materials and techniques there.
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  3. The ambulance is now in Brightwells Timed Online Auction of Classic Cars & Motorcycles Closing Thursday 1st April from 7pm Bidding Opens: Saturday 27th March at 10am Estimate: £18,500-19,500 https://www.brightwellslive.com/lot/details/507829
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  4. It's that time again... Are you sitting comfortably, then I will begin. It's now early May, 2018 and time for a trial fitting of the back board and it's new hinges. First the backboard was clamped into place then the hinges fitted on their long pin and clamped up against the backboard, before the holes were drilled through for 1/2" Whitworth coach bolts to secure the hinges in place. One fixing in each hinge forms the pivot for the legs; this is screwed into a nut, rebated into the back board, and the thread peened over to prevent the nut from coming off. Rebates were also cut for two steel catch plates that protect the backboard as it is closed over the securing pins. I recall staying late at work to make the hinge bolts for this and the upper panel, also the legs. Not done that in a while... Slightly out of sequence, chronologically, but here's the trial fitting of the hinges for the upper panel. May 19th: trial assembly of the front wall framing prior to a quick sprint across to the paint shop. We're now into the last week of May. This was the week before Woolpit Steam. So we've all taken the week off work and are up at the showground from dawn till dark getting everything ready. By rights, the evenings (well from about 9.30pm) would be spent in the pub. Remember when we used to do that? They'll write books about it... Anyway, we voluntarily forewent beer drinking and spent a couple of hours each night on carpentry instead. With the show out of the way, we were able to dedicate more time to the workshop body and complete the boarding out of the front wall. As this weeks instalment draws to a close, I'm going to give my full attention to a glass of Shepherd Neame & Co's India Pale Ale. Doc.
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  5. yes they are you need to order your tyres from john grey from milweb as i have heard he is not in the best of health not covid and you might as well order the wheels from universal jeeps i all so asked him about the deep mud exhaust pipes for your jeep ask him about that i am going to put together an order for jeeparts next week so stand by the phone
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  6. Evening All, Last night I posted pictures of this little cover that I had made. After I had posted my update it started gnawing away at me and by this morning I had decide that it wasn't good enough. I mean, how can any respectable Panzer commander go in to battle knowing that the cover for his little knob is the wrong shape. Below, next to a picture of an original, is my next attempt, which I hope is less offensive. The other items that I made today were the wooden grips for the trigger handle. That's all for now folks. Jon
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  7. I have finished machining the speedo drive parts and fitted them to the lorry. The next jobs are making the flat drive belt and flexible drive shaft. The tensioning spring is a bit too long and weak but it should be easy to sort a replacement.
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  8. a foot note about the grease in the diff it was so thick i filled up the diff with some petrol/derv mix and put the drill on the pinion nut to wiz it over to soften the grease so it would sort of run out when its back from blasting i will remove the pinion and wash it all out and cheque the two pinion bearing and oil seals
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  9. After a bit of a brake from jeeps ( putting down some concrete out side workshop ) this weekend i have been stripping down ready for blasting both of the axles i have never seen a diff that was full of grease how it was still working i will never know the pile for cleaning is getting bigger and bigger, only 2 of the wheels that are combat rims and they took over two hours to strip so much rust i had to cut the tube from the rim hope to get it all to Taffy the blaster next week then i can start on the engine and gear boxes
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  10. Keep at it I'm enjoying this from afar.
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  11. Good to see you are still moving forward, keep us up to date please.
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  12. Fwoo, right, er... Yeah, it's been a while since I signed in here. 2020 kicked the daylights out of me, and 2021 is not doing my nerves any favours. So, since the last post with pictures, in some sort of rough order: I learned a thing about this engine Quoth the manual: Sez the reality: Doesn't look like there's a liner at all, huh? Funny, that. 😄 Had to move unit again. And the landlord at the current one won't let me leave the truck outside, in the parking bay assigned to the unit. So the truck takes up most of the space in the building. And it got there via a weekend's worth of comedy, while I had one hell of a cold and my brain was pudding. I gave all the cylinders another honing, and they've cleaned up decently; No. 4 still has scoring in it, so it'd require the block being bored out in order to get rid of that. Plan remains to get the engine reassembled and running again; it's not ideal, but it should work just fine. Ring end-gap for all cylinders, with the new rings and pistons, is on the loose end of factory spec. Still going to run it. Tongue in cheek answer is: It's boost-ready. December 2020 "Anyone who said hell might freeze over before I get this truck done, may well be right." During that, I started making progress towards the engine going back together. As a side note, I had the head skimmed to ensure it's got a good surface to seal, and the machine-shop said they had to take 8 thou off it to get it flat. (The deck of the block seems to be flat as far as I've been able to measure it) I'll re-CC the chambers further on down the line and work out how that's changed the compression ratio; should be pretty lively, considering how much get up and go it had before, with all but 7 rings stuck, and down a hole! January 2021 Started off with the makings of the new inlet manifold (Because I'm going EFI, but don't want to hack up the nice original manifold to add injector bungs, etc.) Feb 2021 Rods & pistons in the block. Rear main seal seems to be settling in nicely with all the rotation, and it's not so uncomfortably stiff. Still fairly difficult to turn it over, with the drag of a full set of rings and all, but once I overcome the 'stiction', it rolls over nicely. Additionally, have some video of the dismantling process: Back onto reassembly, the timing cover/front pulley seal was a GACO 6350016, which cross-referenced to a Payen NA512 C939, as allegedly used on other Vauxhall products of the era. Timing cover cleaned, scrubbed down, primed. And as of today, painted: Colour seems a little dark compared to the remnants I have of what the engine was originally painted, but it's in the ballpark. Maybe it'll get closer as it dries? Back light wiring has been altered again, now all going to a junction box that also feeds the trailer sockets. Discovered some brake light wiring had rubbed through where a grommet had disintegrated, so I'll repair that too while I'm in the region. In short, things have happened, but not as much as I would've liked to have gotten done; but 2020 ran me flat pretty damn quick, and I'm still struggling to break even, energy-wise. The important thing is that I'm still moving forwards, and I'm still on this side of the grass. I've given myself a deadline to have the engine running by the end of 2021. Seems a long way away, but with as quick as 2020 went by (while simultaneously taking forever), I'm not sure if it's actually too optimistic! Quite a list to get to that point.
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  13. Straight or not, it is a vast improvement on it's previous condition. Any way, quality work always takes a bit more time, and there is always time for another mug of tea
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  14. Thanks👍 , I know what It's like, I don't comment a lot but there's a lot of enjoyable content on this forum. So the next installment. I think that it's always the same, some of the smaller items take the longest to make and so it was with this little cover. Being made of 0.8 and 1.6mm thick steel and so small it took a lot of careful welding, brazing and grinding to get a result that was at least presentable. It's not exact replica of the original but it needed to suit my application. Todays job was to make the adjuster that fits on the side of the gearbox. The adjuster bolt lines up with the internal separate gear carrier and by putting pressure on this carrier, the final gear/ sprocket is pushed into the turret ring gear. If you remember when I started this gearbox I had thought that a spring would have the desired effect but after some playing around I decided that a fixed/ adjustable stop would be a better option. Jon
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  15. Evening all, here’s tonight’s instalment for your amusement and viewing pleasure 😬 Today I tackled the front section of the roof, 3 repair section joggled, whittled and fettled into place. I clamped the roof down in position so I could use the edge of the scaffold board as my roof line I had already cut the rotten gutter edge off at the point. I spent quite a lot of time bending, shaping and getting the fit just right, I wanted to make sure the panel wasn’t under any stress or pressure to avoid similar problems that the rear had. Section 2 in and spot welded, I wasn’t rushing the welding to avoid warping Section 3 in place, the original roof is so battered and out of shape I just had to follow the lines that were there. Several cups of tea later and it’s all welded, I was probably excessive on the time I was leaving in between welds to avoid heat distortion but was It worth it ?? .......NO...... Still distorted but not as bad as the rear, it’s a small problem that I can over come....unlike the rear 🤨 I had to put 3 separate slits in the in the rear panel to reduce the spring, it was like it was laughing at me... I’d straighten one section and the next would spring out, I’d bend and move the next panel and the previous one would pop out !! Talk about loosing the will to live 😩 .......but.... I have a new plan🤔
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  16. No one in their right mind would really do this sober 🍻
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  17. David, there 2 bananas left .. they are yours 🍌🍌
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  18. We had a very good weekend, re-fitted the securing wire on the flywheel bolts, that was a very tedious job. Next we re-fitted the clutch which was straightforward as we have an alignment tool. Then with the use of our large engine crane we lifted the gearbox back into place, this is quite difficult as the gear tower fouls the underside of the seat floor in the cab so the gearbox has to be coaxed in at an angle before the splines engage. Well, it took a while but it was all done safely. Then, we re-fitted the starter motor and the propshaft, next weekend it will be connecting all the smaller levers / cables etc and filling the gearbox with oil in readiness to see how she now starts with the new starter ring fitted. It has been a lot of work but I am so glad we decided to do it now rather than suffer the consequences later.
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