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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/28/2021 in all areas

  1. welcome aboard Toby !
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  2. Evening all, after having been a member on here for a little while now and following with great interest the various restoration threads I thought it was about time I posted some pictures illustrating the rebuild I’m currently undertaking on my 1919 Thornycroft J type. A brief history of the vehicle first I think. ED-1617 left the Basingstoke works on 21st November 1919 having been assigned chassis number J-7860, being delivered to dealer J.Melbourne of Warrington, Cheshire. It would appear they held the vehicle in stock for just over a year until eventually being sold to Joseph Brierley & Sons of Beatrice Street, Warrington on 29th January 1921, being assigned the registration ED-1617. I have very little information on the Brierley Company early on, the only reference I’ve been able to find describing them as ‘Metal Brokers’, they later ended up operating a scrap yard from their premises, from which multiple Supermarine Spitfires were rescued in the mid-70s when their yards were being cleared. ED-1617 remained with the company right up until 1979, the later years of which it lay derelict alongside the firms BT type Thornycroft. From there it was purchased by J.R.Turner of Runcorn, Cheshire and rebuilt alongside J type NB-6684, which now resides in the Milestones collection in Basingstoke. ED-1617 was restored into a fictional military style vehicle at first and attended many events, and appeared in the television series ‘Upstairs Downstairs’. Mr Turner eventually sold the J type to Mr Roger Bone in 2006, who ‘civilianised’ the vehicle, altering the cab and rear body. Under this guise it featured in ‘Downton Abbey’, which can be seen at the very end of this clip: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Wz2O1milqMI I was lucky enough to then purchase the vehicle from Mr Bone in November 2019. I initially planned to just use the vehicle for a year and have a bit of fun, before a strip and rebuild. After a minor amount of tinkering the J type was soon off up the road, and we enjoyed a good couple trips up the pub around Christmas time, and even a job moving a traction engine tender. Mr Wuhan soon put a stop to that however, and so in the first lockdown I decided to strip the vehicle and begin its rebuild early, a decision I do not regret, as I hope by the time events and venues are back to usual the J type will be largely useable again. ^ ED-1617 when being initially restored by Mr Turner of Runcorn. ^ In it’s first guise as a military bodied J type ^ED-1617 shortly after arrival at its new home here in Sussex. ^ Jumping the timeline a little but a few photos from this afternoon having just refitted the overhauled steering box. I’m aiming to restore the vehicle as close to original as possible with the very limited information I have on its original spec, having no photos of ED-1617 earlier than the one shown when being first restored. I do however know the original colour scheme when working for Jsph. Brierley, which I am slowly recreating as components are refurbished and refitted. I will soon upload some more pictures showing the work I have have undertaken so far. Cheers, Toby.
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  3. After our first few rendezvous with the new J type it became apparent there was an issue with the gearbox. The lorry was by this point booked in to the steam fair at Beamish and so I decided to strip and investigate the issue straight away. With the help of a good friend the gearbox was dropped out from the lorry, and then stripped. This was back in January last year and so a full rebuild had not thus been decided. It was nice to find a visual issue, in the form of a snapped key shared between second and third gear on the lay shaft. The bolts holding second and third gear onto their shared hub on the input shaft had also worn their holes excessively, causing the gears to become loose. The worn holes were reamed out oversize, and new fitted bolts made. The worn keyways were recut oversize, and new keys made to suit. All this work was made more tricky by the hardened gears. After the two shafts had been refitted into the cleaned up casing, the end float was reset to the manufacturers spec with a new thrust washer. All the bearings were in impeccable condition, and so were cleaned and reused. The gearbox was given a fresh lick of paint and refitted.
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  4. I can make balls really easily. Just send me a drawing.
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  5. Thanks Burwood, it's nice to know that there's someone out there. Evening All, Continuing with turret gearbox, the next item that I needed to make was the handwheel. Not quite as simple as around disc as it contains a remote trigger for the MG34. It would have been a casting but as I don't have that option, I fabricated it. It started life as a flat piece of 10mm thick steel plate which I cut, turned and then added the relevant bosses. A quick grind with a burr and a shot blast made it look something like the original. Then the wall of the bosses needed to be machine away so that the two are connected as when it is finished a pivoted arm fits in the channel and a slot for a drive key needed machining into the opposite side of the center boss . The handle obviously contains the trigger mechanism, I made the outer housing from separate bits of 3mm plate welded together and then I ground the outer profile to shape. In the pictures I have just dropped a 6mm bolt in the the top of the handle to show how it operates. When the trigger is pulled it raises a rod which raises the pivoted arm held in the channel of the wheel. The other end of the arm, which is slotted into a rod that runs up the center of the gearbox shaft, is pushed down this in turn pulls and pushes a series of rods linked to the trigger on the MG. And that's as far as I got today as I promised myself to spend the afternoon gardening. Jon
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  6. It's now 22nd April or at least it was when this next back of pictures was taken, detailing the trial fitting of the bow ends. This really felt like progress as they gave a tangible impression of the finished form. The majority of the iron brackets are originals. Note: the top fastenings form part of the hinges but as a temporary measure 5/8" bolts were used. The lower ends were secured with square head 3/8" coach screws. David scoured our favourite on-line auction site to find enough to complete the job. After this trial fitting, the frame was dismantled and off to the painting shop. Only these light iron corner straps at the front as it is boarded from top to bottom. Here's the remains of the original: And the new boards in primer. The paint shop was full; this is actually David's living room! As I mentioned in a previous post, we had the builders in... The rear end panels are long gone - these were discarded when the body was converted into a shepherds hut, so have had to be constructed from scratch. Basic shape of the tailboard section New laser-cut hinge blank alongside an original from one of the lower side panels. Old and new... Forming the hinge. Sorry, no crane pictures again this week. Will fire do instead? I like fire.
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  7. Looks as though it is longer than the one in your picture Seamus.
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  8. Karrier progress has been slow of late. On account of my extended period away from work I've not had access to the machine shop. The last few weeks have been spent commissioning my own workshop. First machine to see action is my Dean Smith and Grace lathe. This would have been scarcely five years old when the Karrier was recovered in 1977; it's still got plenty of years left in it. A very different machine to the Harrison M300 I'm used to, it has to be said. I repurposed an old copper drift, turning it into a mandrel to support the broken steering ball joint so it could be welded back together. Thanks to my brother Gerald for doing the welding. So now I was able to complete the fitting of the drag link. Another small job crossed off the list.
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  9. I recently discovered that my 1940 Royal Enfield WD/C had been fitted with a later (WD/CO type) front frame section. Apparently these frames are quite weak and under the duress of heavy duty army work, it was quite common for them to break at the front down tube. So the heavier duty CO frame would often have been fitted. I acquired a correct 1940 front frame from a fellow RE enthusiast, resprayed and fitted it. Fortunately it's just possible to swap the front frames without disturbing the engine/gearbox etc. I've copied the markings from a series of army trials pictures. Ron
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  10. So here the tracks fitted, when the adjusters are all the way in, they will slip over the sprocket and idlers quite easily, but as it is still on stands, I had to put a pallet under the tracks to stop them sagging too much, it's a 2 man job! And adjusted. Looking good! More later. Lex
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  11. Is that a Serious question?
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  12. Finally got a decent days weather to do a bit more on Tanker work. I thought I was done with the cut and weld malarky ages ago, and was well peeved when I found these holes in the pump room floor the other week. Can't pretend I didn't see it and just hope it goes away, so dust off welder and fetch the grinder again Might as well chop the whole square out, because the remaining metal is pretty thin as well. Corralex sheet stuffed underneath helps to protect the diesel tank top from sparks. Weld in new plate. It's 3mm thick so a lot more forgiving than thin body panels. Usual coat of Bonda to finish off. Unfortunately there was a little collateral damage on the out side, a few bubbles in the DBG which will need a bit of treatment, but the floor is fixed and that was plan A so not a bad effort.
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  13. Tomo T comments regards these being a prototype is always a fair point. The build register shows the use of the M4 engine being available from July 1913, however it appears the L4 engine continued to be more popular by demand. Well at least more were supplied in lorries passing out of the factory. The point of sending them to the Colonies also raises issues, for many are listed as being supplied to the home market. Tozer, Kemsley and Fisher were exporting agents also sending products from many other different manufactures all about the world. Although their name appears regularly on the dispatch column there is no indication as to where these vehicles went to. To make things a little easier for me in New Zealand, a local firm of A. Hatrick & Co. began importing Thornycrofts, placing their first order on 30-8-1912. To confuse the issue Hattrick's also had an office in Sydney, and there are still Thornycroft's in Australia with a Hatrick agency name plate. No records are known to have survived from the Hatrick companies covering the imported chassis numbers. From the Thornycroft production records the Hatrick name appears fifty five times to April 1915, the last five being ordered after the commencement of hostilities. Eleven different models are recorded as been delivered. These early J models did have their problems in France during the early months of The Great War with the major repair depots making changes to the vehicle parts. Apparently a replacement rear axle casing was designed and cast in France by the depot, to replace the five piece diff housing as used on these early J's. This then became the standard when the J model was repowered to the M4 engine in August 1915. From Steve's photos we can see the gearbox was another item that received a dramatic change in form, along with the position of the fuel tank. Other changes to the Subsidy wagon included the steering track rod being moved to behind the axle, the front wheels became larger and the front spring hangers were moved from the front to the rear end of the springs. Steve in providing these photos and passing on more data by email has greatly assisted in allowing the similar J here to progress further towards restoration, for now there is another one to compare with. Doug
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  15. I’ve started the engine rebuild. It’s taking a lot longer. But i’m taking my time as it my first rebuild.
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  16. The cab is starting to take shape
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  17. The workshop contents were back-breaking to carry and we seemed to be lifting boxes out of the trailer for some time without any signs of it becoming more empty!! We made one more trip after that, bringing home some lounge furniture, some camping gear and some of the 1940's kit. I think we're going to have an easier day tomorrow to avoid burn out.
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  18. spent today removing all the rusty panels and patches have ground up all the spot welds there is a lot of steel to put back just need to do a bit of panel beating to dress all the edge angles then strip down the only two combat wheels and axles then off to taffy the best blaster in the north west
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  19. Regular readers of this thread will recall my grandmother’s indifference to her relative being knocked over and fatally injured by an omnibus. My Grandmother had a great many indifferences, notably my grandfather, foreigners, her neighbours, and anyone who sought to help her. And most particularly cocky children. I was categorised such. On our infrequent visits to my grandmother, we would listen patiently to a list of new enemies, new injustices and petty prejudices. I would while away my time studying her collection of ornaments and wondering how a woman filled with so much bile and malcontent for the world around her could find pleasure in a figurine of a kitten that looked so unlike its prototype that I wondered if the sculptor had ever actually seen a kitten. And so my grandmother’s collection of ornamental tat was curated. The tackier and gaudier the better. And then this popped up on ebay. A radiator cap so magnificent (except the price) that suddenly I could see the attraction of shiny ornaments. I only now need to screw a lorry to it and I will be done. In the meantime I shall place it on my mantelpiece. I might have been a cocky child but I have every right to be having secured such a rare and hard to find lorry part. Hurrah for ornaments. Hurrah for ebay!
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  20. Bodging or improvise and overcome? There has been much discussion on this forum and other sites about extra lights on your MV for travelling to and from shows. I'm very much in favour of it, there have been far too many accidents to MV's over the years, a lot of which have been attributed to the other motorist not seeing the rear lights on the slower moving MV. Now you would like to think that a Militant would be able to with stand some clown running into the back, but if a fully loaded Stolly can get punted into the woods (see the thread about the one in Australia) a Militant could easily suffer the same fate. The Tanker isn't short of rear lights and reflectors, it has tail, outline and side markers, but more is always better I have a magnetic beacon on the other Militant and it certainly helps to light up the back of the truck both in daylight and at night Best bit is, it only takes seconds to fit or remove when you get to a show. So I need sort one out for the Tanker. Tanker has 2 trailer sockets on the back. A standard NATO 12 pin and an American Warner one. I want to leave the NATO one alone, just in case I want to plug a trailer in one day, so plugging the beacon into the warner socket would be ideal. Warner socket looks like this The four cross shaped plates inside are the terminals, so just need a plug to fit Plug looks like this Given that these were fitted to all American trailer stuff during WW2 and on into the fifties you'd think there would be a few of them still around. But can I find one? Yeah, found just one. Bloke in the states has one, but he wants £125 for it plus another £30 postage, add on whatever British Customs deem necessary to bring it into the country, and well...... Not going to do that. Sure I can make something that will "do", but how? Bit of head scratching later and an idea turned up. Heavy gauge copper wire bent up like in the photo to make the terminals, set them into a mould, then fill with fibre glass resin. Once set it would be solid enough to push in and pull out, and as it's plastic it's insulated as well. Conveniently, a standard silicone mastic tube is the perfect size to fit the socket, so an empty one was cleaned out and used as the mould. Connect the beacon cable to the copper wire terminals and seal that in as well so it all becomes one piece Comes out like this and plugs in thus Needs the sharp edges sanding off now, and a coat of paint to finish it off. Might be a bit of a Heath Robinson bodge, but the important bit is, it does work ! Job done
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  21. Another magnificent job Ron! And great to see the correct Royal Enfield style census number. The war time photograph by the way was taken at the April 11th 1943 Medway Challenge Cup, "a team event run between various companies in an R.A.S.C. Division, including a number of riders from H.Q., in which the three best performers from each unit were taken as forming the team, each rider being marked individually throughout the event. Competitors had had little previous experience in motorcycling on cross-country courses and the prime object of the contest was not only to improve their standard of riding but also to afford them an opportunity of putting into practice lessons they had previously learned. A total entry of 66 was received, all of whom were mounted on 350 c.c. side-valve Royal Enfields; this no rider had any advantage over another in the matter of "machinery", it being purely a question of ability." (from MotorCycling, April 22 1943).
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