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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/12/2021 in all areas

  1. Richard, that's the fellows. There is a newer looking version as well: I should recognise that 'T' logo on the front, but I can't bring it to mind. I'm so pleased with my detective work I can't resist bragging about it. It was actually you asking for the location and No Signals posting the BFA image number that set me off - and needing diversion from work! Looking at the photo against online mapping, I found the plot of land is between Craigston Rd and Helen St in Govan (a site now occupied by Govan Asda). National Libraries of Scotland have old Glasgow (and other) maps online at high resolution, and a 1937 Bartholomews told me that the 'factory' in the photos is in fact the Govan Refuse Destructor and Electricity Generating Station: I looked this up and it was Glasgow Corporation owned, and apparently used to burn 640 tons of refuse a day to generate 10.3mW electricity. The idea of a refuse destructor took me to dustcarts, and the rest was easy. With all that electricity on tap, using some to charge electric vehicles must have been a no-brainer. I think the long trucks with the big gap behind the cab - of which there are at least 15 in the photo - are all these electric dustcarts. I think you're right about the mechanical horses, but I think at least some are Karrier Cobs. I think the vehicle top left with a conspicuous radiator surround is a Shelvoke similar to this, but with the dustcart style body: There are a few vehicles with a flat cab roof rounded at the front, not sure what these are but possibly earlier Shelvokes or something electric again? All the very small bonneted vehicles I think are mechanical horses and normal control Lacre style road sweepers, perhaps Karrier based. I think your bonneted tractor is just that but may be Fordson or Karrier rather than American, with a dustcart trailer. There are a few odds and ends which I think are odd trailers and things like this: http://www.mitchelllibrary.org/virtualmitchell/image.php?i=16302&r=2&t=4&x=1 I found an interesting forum post talking about these electric dustcarts here: http://www.hiddenglasgow.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=7263 and some archive film here: https://movingimage.nls.uk/film/0420 - see particularly at 00:40 and 01:40. Unfortunately, the logo in the top photo aside, I haven't been able to identify the make of the electric dustcarts, so there's still some detective work left for someone ...
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  3. And the last bit of the puzzle falls into place. http://www.glesga.ukpals.com/transport/cars1.htm claims it's a Garrett GTZ, built by the steam traction engine builders (bottom of page) And from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Garrett_%26_Sons#Electric_vehicles "In 1926, Garrett won a contract to supply dustcarts to Glasgow Corporation, who were looking for a special design for collecting refuse from the tenements of Govan. Electric vehicles were needed, because much of the refuse was collected during the night. Garrett put a lot of effort into producing a suitable vehicle, which became known as the model GTZ. To make them more manoeuvrable, the front wheels were located behind the cab, and the chassis was redesigned to produce a very low loading line, only 4 feet 8 inches (1.42 m) above the road surface. The batteries were fitted over the front axle, between the cab and the body. Because they were only ever likely to work out of the recycling plant at Govan, tipping gear was not fitted to each vehicle, but was instead built into the Govan plant. The first vehicle of a batch of 36 was completed on 25 February 1927, and proved successful, at Garret eventually supplied 54 GTZ units with solid tyres, and later a smaller batch fitted with pneumatic tyres. They continued to work in Glasgow until the GTZ system was phased out in 1964." Edit - and having watched more of the film, it indeed shows the dustcarts tipping (08:00). It seems the body was hinged not at the rear but at the right hand side, and they simply hooked a chain to the left hand side and tipped the body. The film clearly shows the refuse destructor plant seen in the photo No Signals references, and an earlier style cab again at 07:13. Interestingly though the article above talks about solid wheels, all three types we've found have pneumatic tyres.
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  4. Just added my GPW. The problem I can see is that there’s no guide to read before posting or someone to filter out the rubbish. The older list was plagued with inaccuracies such as Engine serial number GPW 6015 which is the part number, there were a few dozen of those. Also, mine is GPW6008 which could be written as 6008, GPW 6008 or GPW6008 or any other imaginable variations. It won’t be long before it’s impossible to gain any information from it.
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  5. Yes, he is way too bizzy right now, but I can have some lenses and rims made, that's not a problem, but the rest, the plastic lense, I don't have. Lucas bases are OK, but where to find them? Lex
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  6. I can see several what appears to be Scammell Mechanical Horses, some with trailers. The other lorries in question on the far right look to be articulated and my guess is they are Crossley tractor units, but there is one bonneted tractor with a longer trailer in amongst them, which could be of American origin. These could all be RAF vehicles, where is the location? The vehicles all in a line facing left look to be coaches or aircrew buses.
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  7. A distant family member, whose precise relationship to me I don't recall, was fatally injured in the 1930s by being struck by a Motor Omnibus. It was of no great consequence, as he was, as my Grandmother ruefully described him, "a reader of cheap fiction". Such affectations were of great consequence in those days. There is one thing I am certain about though. I would like to think that the fatal Omnibus carried fittings made or sold by Thomas Tingley, Coach and Motor Body Builders, of Walworth, London. This Thomas Tingley catalogue popped up on ebay last week for four quid. I present it here (in PDF form), for other pre-WWII bus and lorry botherers to mull over and wish they could still buy components at these prices. Thos. Tingley were well known for infrequent catalogue updates. I estimate they seemed to think every fifty years or so was more than enough, and so much of the contents dates from a period before its 1935 cover date. I think even with my Grandmother's distaste for cheap books she would acknowledge that four pounds was a bargain, and a nice way to remember ancient Omnibuses, if not distant, dead relatives. I also include a couple, of what the trashier-press call "teaser pictures". It was simpler times when a Gentleman had separate brushes for Mudguard and Hub! Tingley Catalogue.pdf
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  8. Remember when lock-downs were still a novelty? Well, back in March 2020 this rather delightful little beauty appeared on our favourite on-line auction site. In response to the "Make and Offer" option an offer was made, which was promptly refused. The drill was subsequently bought second bid. A forum stalwart kindly took delivery and when free movement was once again possible (which now seems a distant memory) it made its way up country to Oxfordshire. Finally, after the 2nd lock-down was over, we were able to collect it. So we have a Silver Manufacturing Co. Advance No. 12 drill. A little smaller than the No. 24 as listed in the parts book, hence the oak spacer block, but maybe if we keep it warm and nurture it, it might grow. In the real world, maybe one will turn up. But in the mean-time, this is a good substitute.
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  9. Hello Rick, Thanks for posting the pic of your frame. Originally, I was going to fabricate a chassis and had planned to source some wheels and springs etc. from the Rolls- Royce Foundation (USA) where I volunteer one day a month. Then I located the R-R chassis I subsequently acquired. There was a Phantom P1 drive train in it, but the owner already had a buyer for it. Regardless, the P1 engine is quite different from the motor that was fitted to the RRACs, so it was never really a serious option. Once word began to spread of my build in R-R circles, people began to contact me and that led to me locating a 'correct' engine and gearbox at what was really a very favourable price. I took a trip to Steve Litten at Ghost Parts near Cleveland Ohio USA as he specializes in the restoration of Silver Ghosts. Very accommodating chap originally from NZ, Steve took me through his extensive workshops where his team were restoring several 'Civilian' Ghosts. As we moved from room to room, I began to make mental notes of what I would need for this engine and the costs involved. It wasn't long before I ran out of fingers and realized the price of parts alone was going into the tens of thousands of (US) Dollars. So bearing in mind that this is not a restoration of an original vehicle and that it will be used in (reenactor) anger on a variety of off-road terrain, focus became more on correct exterior appearance and driveability than originality. I therefore decided on and easily located a Ford 300 inline 6 engine ( 4.9 Liter) of mid '80s manufacture and a Ford 4 speed gearbox with a 'Granny' first gear. Using a cam designed for this engine when used in a RV motorhome application, it will have plenty of low end grunt to carry a crew of 3, our personal equipment a Vickers and around 800 rounds of (blank) .303 ammo on an extended 4 day weekend at Newville giving the Hun a damn good thrashing. These are full immersion events, rather like a Territorial/National Guard weekend but using WW1 equipment. Only in America! As you can see from pics in my previous post, I made a drive shaft to link the Ford gearbox to the R-R rear axle and torque tube (which contains a partial R-R driveshaft 3/4 length with a 10 bolt flange). The radiator is a genuine R-R item circa 1917 and is of dubious water tightness. It's a huge cast iron affair and took 2 people to lift it into place on the chassis. To handle cooling, I 've bolted an aluminium rad to the back of it with a (coincidentally) 1918cfm Spal puller fan. In reality, it's unlikely I'll ever get out of 2nd gear in the terrain of Newville PA, so after discussion with Spal USA, the fan should do the job. Engine mounts are a combination of R-R and my modifications/fabrications - no original lugs were harmed in the installation of the Ford Powertrain, so if for any reason in the far future, someone wanted to convert the car back to civilian spec. with a body and OE engine, they can do so without cursing my memory.
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  10. Sounds like a great project. There was a replica WWI RR Silver Ghost project here in Australia a few years ago but the bloke passed away and when the RR came up for auction, the wining bidder only took the rolling chassis and the scrappy got the complete replica body which went to China in the great scrap drive at the time. Do you have the correct Silver Ghost engine and running gear or are you going to use the what ever engine you have removed? I am restoring a 1929 20/25hp Rolls and I am lucky to have the complete rolling chassis with all matching numbers. This is the 20/25 chassis as it is at the moment. It was severely damaged in an accident in 1974 but is now dead straight.
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