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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/28/2020 in all areas

  1. Doc, The karrier has never looked better, it probably never looked as good while in use. The Fairbanks would have admired your efforts. Martin.
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  2. All are Original photos from my collection. Keith
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  3. Good afternoon all, New here, Mark (Mongo) from the UK. Predominantly interested in armoured cars, specifically those potentially driven by my grandfather as part of the 12th Lancers and later GHQ Liaison Regiment (Phantom). This includes Lanchesters, Guy Armoured Cars, Humber Scout/LRC, Jeeps and WSC's. Here to learn more about vehicles in general, as most of my history has been based on personnel. Many Thanks Mongo.
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  4. Maybe you need to get swmbo to agree to a tent repair, then repair it with 5 tons of RSJs and a truckload of insulated cladding.
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  5. Original photo from my collection The BAOR mobilised former pow soldiers into the German Civil Labour Organisation (GCLO) on some of the trucks [ 502, 529 ] . This provided paid work and accommodation for thousands of men. By late 1947, over 50,0000 Germans were employed as labourers, drivers, mechanics and in many other roles. In 1948-49, the GCLO played a major part in supporting the Allied effort during the Berlin Airlift.
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  6. I've been asked the meaning of these. I = Suffering from an infectious disease V = Suffering from VD Probably just in a hospital setting. Troop ships were required to carry 6 Jackets, serge, unlined (blue) for troops with VD. A humiliating but stark warning for everyone on board no doubt.
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  7. You do have some nice landscapes in the UK. Her its mainly flat country.
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  8. Found these on my pc that i have had for years. I think i have a few more i can put up if you want. Keith
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  9. I should add commercial vehicles by definition carry goods or people for reward. Military vehicles do neither and beneficially have their own defenition . If you can demonstrate the vehicles provenance it should allow your solicitor to quickly close the topic Jenkinov
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  10. I thought I might clear up some misunderstandings about how the landing craft PA30 11 used in the movie Saving Private Ryan ended up in Northern Ireland.. Myself, Robert Gyle & my business partner Mark Huffam owned a film facilities company called G&H Film & Television Services , based in Holywood, Northern Ireland. Mark was an associate producer on the movie. Our company was asked to go & inspect PA30 11 which was lying on a beach 100 miles away in the small fishing port of Burtonport in Southern Ireland & the craft was owned by a local trawler man who had bought it the move tractors & livestock to an offshore island. He had never actually used it as it needed a lot of Re-commissioning before it would be seaworthy. I inspected & photographed the boat. The 2 Foden 2stroke supercharged Diesel engines seemed never to have been used as the white paint on them was like new. The boat was purchased from the gentleman in Burtonport & taken to our workshop where it was given a complete overhaul including double fuel & double charging systems in case of an emergency the systems could be changed over to the spare one, all electrics & instruments were renewed, all throttle linkages were fitted with rose joints for smooth operation. Prop shaft seals & bearings were renewed as was the large seal on the drop down loading door. When the work was completed we transported the boat to Wexford in Ireland for sea trials & also because this is the location for the main beach landing scenes. All this work was carried out to this landing craft for the safety of the main actor Tom Hanks. After it was finished filming on the movie it was transported to our workshop at Holywood, Northern Ireland where it was stored for a few years. A gentleman called at our workshop out of the blue interested in buying it because by coincidence he had bought an island of the West coast of Ireland & required a landing craft to take diggers & building materials over to the island, which had no landing jetty & he was going to reconstruct an old island house. He bought the boat & we delivered it to his farm Waringstown in Co.Down. The new owner successfully used PA30 11 to take all the materials & machinery to the island & he was able to build his house. The whereabouts & ownership of the boat after that we are not sure about. Robert Gyle
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  11. My 1920 Austin tractor is all single chamfer "small" Whitworth. Incidentally, I get my nuts and bolts from Trojan Special Fasteners in Birmingham. They'll make exactly what you want, but no good ordering ones and twos; I usually order in multiples of 10 feet as this is the standard length in which the hex bar is supplied. Hope this helps. Andy
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  12. As the end of 2020 fast approach’s ( thank God !! ) I thought I would do a quick update the on progress of the Fordson since my last post..... ZERO!!!!!!!!!! ......... the down side of working on your driveway , bad weather and short winter evenings coupled together with work being busy, lockdowns, COVID and isolation... the project has currently stalled for the moment but will resume when the weather improves or if I win the lotto and buy a massive fully equipped workshop!! I know we’re all in the same boat and it’s been a testing year for everyone but look on the bright side, the evenings are getting lighter ( slowly ) 2021 🤞will be a cracking year for military vehicle shows and hopefully we might get to go on holiday without wearing a Hazmat suit 🤨 Some of you might remember the temporary garage I put up to work on the truck needless to say the wife was less than impressed but it served its purpose. Fast forward a few months and this is how it looked this morning!! Storm Bella clearly sided with my wife and didn’t like it either, despite being tied to the truck and 2 old batteries securing the legs it didn’t stand a chance.... And just to add insult to injury my wife sticks her head out the window, smiles and utters those words “ is it broken “ As you can imagine the reply can’t be posted on this blog 😬
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  13. Sadly no parts or message were received from TI Engineering, so progress has been limited to making gaskets and fitting the cover plates to the cylinders. I was able to recover some of the original nuts but also had some N.O.S. which are slightly shorter in the hex but otherwise identical. The originals are mostly of the reduced size of Whitworth nuts, (one size smaller across flats) and finished with a single chamfer. Both short and long hex versions can be seen here, the originals are on the right. If anyone has a good source of these nuts in Whitworth sizes please shout ! A trial fitting of one of the curious inserts, which seal the valve chambers was also carried out. We have three still useable and five are on Mike Lewendon's job list for the New Year. Here's hoping for a better new year ! Tomo
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  14. I can't answer your question about sizes of shirts, but as for the rest the answer is "fashion". It became very popular to blouse the combat jacket by tying the bottom drawcord tightish at the waist and then pulling the skirt down. This resulted in the skirt pockets being folded in two and, if a belt were worn, its being round them making using the pockets impossible. At the same time it bulked out the upper part of the jacket making it look a bit like a battledress blouse. It was a very popular thing to do for a while, but, to me, never made any sense and I didn't copy it. The hood was very rarely attached - some units didn't even issue it to their soldiers. Generally it was scorned because our training NCOs rightly railed against anything which reduced a soldier's senses in the field and wearing a hood diminished hearing - particularly if it was raining - so it was seen as being something no frontline soldier wished to do. But, again, fashions change and later the smock was issued with a hood (as was, of course, the SAS smock even at that time). So, merely fashion. The same applied to the combat cap - when the DPM version first appeared it had a great following, even being worn with a capbadge - for a very short time before it became unpopular for some reason - it was always more useful in the field than the alternative at the time which was a beret (the wearing of helmets in the field only became universal with the introduction of the plastic one, prior to that the "tin hat" was worn only in defence or under direct fire being carried for the rest of the time). The credibility of the combat cap sank yet further as it became used as a headdress for recruits who had yet to earn the right to wear their regimental headdress by "passing off the square". Regarding holding up combat trousers... fashion. At one time it was seen as very unprofessional to wear combats with a stable belt - your 58 pattern belt or something similar which avoided your having to break down your webbing, (you were only issued one web belt) such as a spare 37, 44 or 58 pattern web belt or the awful dark green plastic woven belt would be used. Later, it became fashionable for units to wear the stable belt with combat dress as it probably is currently. Some regiments and corps adopt habits frowned upon by others and customs come and go. in the 1960s, early 70s anyone likely to wear radio headsets used the "double pull" on his beret - cap badge in centre and roughly equal amounts of cloth each side. That went right out of fashion by the mid 70s. 20 years later it was popular to wear the beret with the badge over the left ear while Paras wore theirs rather like a flat cap with the spare cloth pulled forward over the forehead. Shrinking berets, on the other hand was always popular after the end of national service! Looking at your photo above you will see that the full length of the boot is left clear of the trouser ends. Again that was a fashion when high boots were introduced replacing ankle boots and puttees or web anklets. Prior to that it had been fashionable to pull the bloused trouser ends as far down as possible concealing nearly all but the body of the boot. Nowadays, it seems, the fashion is not to blouse the trousers at all. All these things change over time. But, it is a really useful way to date old photos!
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  15. I've managed to sort some parts out today, some for patterns some to use and some partly remade all working towards getting the engine frame work and covers done. I've got the front frame ready to locate and drill in position. The front frame once in position will then give me the location of the 3 middle floor plates as they bolt together. I've held off finishing and fitting these floor plates as I wasn't sure how to locate them. The rear frame is also done and this just needs cutting to length and drilling. First I need to finish making the 2 uprights and fit the front frame to give me the height of the rear frame. Hopefully I will start to make some visible progress tomorrow.
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  16. Chain oiler looks a lot different now it's cleaned Didn't even realise the centre was glass, but at least I managed not to break it. Not sure I want to paint it back into silver
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  17. In 1983 the Albion was used in the first big Australian TV production, a 10 hour story called “The ANZACS” here she is on set in a ‘French village’. And also with a 1916 Talbot ambulance for company on site. A vintage lane in England? No our driveway a few years ago. So where is she today, On loan to the Bandiana Military Museum where it has been for a number of years. She was on display at the Australian War Memorial for 3 ½ years before going to Bandiana. We often get her out for a run and will see her for a belated birthday drink in a couple of weeks. “HAPPY 100th BIRTHDAY - 361A” Rick and Jill.
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