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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/10/2020 in all areas

  1. I was thinking more along the lines of if you main cross member was usable, you may only need the rest..? Or you could get a local fabricator to knock out a bit of had channel for that piece? I had to do that for the cross member that goes under the rear of the tub
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  2. The main cross section in my photo is the JMP piece in the picture and at the time I restored my jeep they only did the ACM2 replacement channels you have pictured and as I have a ACM1 tub, that was the only piece I used... So, I have the rest spare if you want to PM me an offer?
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  3. I added some stock steel in place of the original oak, loads of primer and then dynax wax I use this stuff on the Jeep and my wifes VW Camper
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  4. I said I would look out the photo of the DAC on Salisbury Plain in the 1960s. I reckon this will be about 1968. The other photos show a Conqueror and a 155mm SP How at "The Round" on the road between the Bustard and Market Lavington at around the same time, I should think judging by my size. Pleased to see Dad wearing a jacket and tie for a trip in the country at that time! 10 68
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  5. The hardest part of any restoration is deciding how far to go. I like to keep as much as original as possible but at some point, it just becomes unrealistic. I’ve seen some replace small sections of hat channels that have rotted through which is fine. But in my experience the rest isn’t far behind and sometimes you’ve just got to bite the bullet and replace the lot.
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  6. I’ve also heard of nylon being used instead of oak.
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  7. It’s real, there were quite a few photos of it. I think they would describe it as “well balanced” where as Esther Rantzen would describe it as “a potential disaster!”
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  8. Having spent some time in Kenya I think that the bottom photo is quite possible. I saw a small bus in Nairobi once with 26 mattresses piled up on top and tied on with a rope that went under the bus and up the other side, over the top and tied onto the loose end of the same rope. The mattresses were wobbling in a most impressive way whenever the bus turned or braked. It is normal there to get at least double the number of people into a vehicle than would be acceptable in the UK or US, triple if things are busy. The attitude was: If you die, you die ! Great fun ! David
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  9. I drove this vehicle in the 1960s when I was in the AFS in Middlesbrough. Being in the NE region we were allowed to train with the recovery unit and on one occasion, I collected it from Gateshead fire station. We had it with us for the local agricultural show for recruitment display purposes but several cattle trucks got bogged down in the whet grass. We had a whale of a time winching them out with a snatch block lashed to a tree for some of the pulls. On another occasion we towed one of our SPs (popularly know as a Green Goddess - though we never used the term). We did some practice lifts and things in a deserted part of the old steel works and towed the SP back through the centre of town, on the hook. The Chief went potty thinking we had had a crash. We also towed Landrovers on the ambulance a couple of times. We took the cuola cover off for the big tow through town so that one of our crew could stand on the engine cover observe the casualty - all a bit dramatic. As well as the cupola the cab had a couple of rifle clips - empty of course but showing the vehicle's military pedigree. Another difference to our other vehicles, it had air brakes rather than vacuum servo. We used to go on convoy exercises from the NE, rendezvous at Scotch Corner then travel to Chorley in Lancashire over Stainmore. The recovery vehicle was always with us, driven, I think, by a mechanic from the Darlington Depot of the United Omnibus Company. It was needed on at least a couple of occasions. Happy days!
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  10. Not much of an update, the storage yard has been closed for some new gate posts going in and when I have been able to work on it, all the screws have been badly corroded. so all the floor is now out and the side armour has been removed. I was going to lift the front firewall/bulkhead off as one lump but I realised 1. It was heavy and 2. I would need something that lift quite high. The yard owner is happy to loan me his telehandler but I found some cracks in the windshield supports so decided to play it safe and dismantle the dash and windscreen from the firewall and remove as 2 separate and lighter items. Splitting them in theory is a case of simply undoing a load of screws and removing the top and side armour. That’s never the case though and many lock nuts are now just lumps of iron ore. Some of the space available is so small it can take a 1/2 hour just to chisel the nut off. My back hand hammer action is developing well. 2 screws I’m not looking forward to are blind with captive nuts. I’ve not removed one screw yet by using a turn screw, I would normally just hold the head with the turn screw and undo the nut. I have a feeling I’ll be drilling these out. So here is the result.
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  11. Ok some pics . There is more stuff . The canvas cover and the wooden shipping box .
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