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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/29/2020 in all areas

  1. This is a nice looking Jeep but certainly not accurate for WW2, and if it is to be a post war Jeep then the RAF Blue needs to be gloss. Possibly the fenders needed to be gloss black too, as per the AMO for postwar. In WW2 Jeeps in the RAF were quite rare in the UK and 4 Group Bomber Command. I bet 4 Group never had any like this as the vehicle is too small to carry a bomber crew, too underpowered to pull a bomb load or a bowser and the CO was more likely to be driven around in the saloon behind the Jeep in this photo to wish his crews good luck etc. There were a few Jeeps in Bomber C
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  2. On Sunday I went to visit a woman I have known since the 1960's. In her paddock she has this GMC that was a runner before it was sheeted up. I recall tat she said that it was used on the film Saving Private Ryan. It is located near St Helens, Lancashire. She may sell it. PM me if of interest.
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  3. I restored my MK1 Welbike well over 20 years ago, but now with the wealth of information that is available today, I'm going to repaint it and address some minor issues. Originally I sprayed it Service Brown, but I'm reliably informed by Lex that it should be green. Not Khaki or Olive drab, but some sort of darker green. I've gone for "Dark Camouflage Green" Which is close enough to my eyes to the sample Lex sent me. (Who knows for sure anyway?) The only parts not to be painted are the cables, grips, fuel hoses, HT lead/cap/plug, tyres/valves, saddle cover and the engine mounting nuts
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  4. got new wind screens fitted last night and the bonnet has returned from being shot blasted so that is know being worked on. managed to get the nova number last week as well so started the registration process. hopefully be driving it on the road this year.
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  5. Can't leave Dad to have all the fun! Now that the front wheels are on along with the track rod, king pins and stub axles, the king pins need some greasers. We are fortunate to have the remains of three but, of course, we will eventually need four. They screw into the top of the king pin and , when the knob is turned, a piston is driven downwards expelling the grease and pushing it down the hole in the king pin. I took them apart for a clean and to assess what parts were missing. This was the most complete example having both the knob and locking clip. We have two
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  6. I shall keep an eye open for a period colour photo of an RAF vehicle in Blue/grey. You may be correct, that they don't exist. but Dad who has only recently succumbed to his old age affecting his cognitive abilities has always maintained that RAF vehicles were generally blue! He was also in Burma I think with 152 Squadron where he was a ground Engineer on Spits, Thunderbolts and Mozzies from memory. Here he is in an almost famous photo as I have seen it several times on the net. He is kneeling down and holding the tail legs. Robert ( Bob ) Honychurch bought his first Jeep in 1951 whic
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  7. Sill looking to replace some of the missing bits and in particular, the braking system at the present time. The Transmission Brake or Foot Brake is known as the Service Brake in the Parts Book - there should be two adjustable Anchor Rods for this and we only have one original. That original is fit to use again and a new second one is being fabricated as a copy of that original - the eye at the end is to be welded to the rod but screwed in now to hold it all together. The hole for the pin can be opened up to the final diameter after welding.All straight forward but there are UNF threads on this
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  8. I use a acetylene torch, never used the shrinking disc. Worth a try I guess? Let us know what you think after first time use. 👍
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  9. I’ve been toying with the idea and I’ve seen plenty of YouTube vids on using one. You know when you see something and you think “that looks easy” and you then think “is it to easy”? And then the next thing you think is “I’m sure I can f*** it up some how”.
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  10. Hello Andrew, I thought this was my mates jeep when I first saw it but its not. his Jeep is a excellent RAF blue as well I can ask him what the mix was but I know the suppliers were 'Automotive Paint Supplies' in Adershot, Surrey: . 01252 313141.. They can literally mix any colour you want, recently they duplicated a earth brown on one of my bikes, which whilst not the usually, turd colour, is a really nice version and I wanted to keep it. They said it caused them a few problems but have exactly copied the colour for me. As a footnote....I am with you on this subject of vehic
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  11. It took me a whole hour to strip it and remove the tyres. Frame, engine and some ancillaries are now painted. Ron
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  12. Hi Larry and thanks for the reply. Firstly let me say I was aware of the debate and no doubt very accurate analysis of RAF vehicle paint during WW2, all of which makes perfect sense to me. I already have a Green Jeep and dont mind about whether its accurate or not. Secondly and perhaps a bit more controversially my father was in the RAF during the second world war and was seconded to water proofing vehicles ahead of D Day at RAF Little Rissington. After this he was sent to the Far East and used to offer to drive his CO in his Jeep when the CO was going on a mission. My father reca
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  13. Pushed on with the diff housing and made some interesting discoveries too. Firstly the material is not cast iron as originally thought, but cast steel. Some nice markings are visible The part No. is revealing. In the 1919 parts book this No. has been superseded by 58104. 'Auriga' states that 57935 was updated in 1915 but is not clear what was altered. Thornycroft part No's were updated chronologically and 58XXX series began to appear around Jan, 1915 This dates our new casting as earlier. One thing that is obvious is that the replacem
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  14. After the usual Equinox rain and gales down here yesterday was a bit calmer so I could get the workshop doors open and move stuff around ready for phase two of the cab repair Completed front scuttle parked out of the way on the back of the Retriever And so it starts all over again on the rear floor and back panel, first job was to crane it off the tank at the back of the workshop and get it on a pallet where it can be worked on Quick look round and asses what needs doing Out with the chalk to mark up what needs replacing. The whole top section o
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