Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/22/2020 in all areas

  1. Its looking superb!
    1 point
  2. Hi 67 burwood There is a certain amount of dodgy information above! 78 Infantry Division never carried desert rat insignia, neither was it ever in 21 Army Group. It operated in Tunisia and thereafter in Sicily, Italy and Austria. The Divisional sign was the battleaxe as you appear to be aware, yellow axe on black disc or square. 78 Division always contained three Infantry Brigades (basically there were no Armoured Infantry brigades during WW2). All three brigades would have carried the divisional emblem on their vehicles. The senior brigade was indicated by its AoS number being on a red square, the second brigade on a green square and the third brigade (38 Irish) on a brown square, so your green background would mean 36 Infantry Brigade. The numbers for 36 brigade should have been 60 (5 Buffs), 61 (6 RWK), and 62 (8 Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders). For 38 Brigade the numbers should have been 67 (2 or 6 Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers depending on time), 68 (2 London Irish Rifles) and 69 (1 Royal Irish Fusiliers). I say 'should' as the normal order of precdence may have been amended to show the difference between regular and territorial units. I have no knowledge of the exact shade of green or brown used, but the green appears to be just about what you would expect from 'green', not dark, not light, but green. The brown is also about what you would expect from a paint called 'brown', not dark, not light, but obviously brown. Infantry Brigades were generally not provided with enough transport to carry all their personnel, though some were designated as Lorried Infantry or Motor Brigades. As far as I know, 78 Division's brigades were ordinary infantry brigades and relied on Divisional Transport Companies (RASC) to transport them when necessary. HTH Chris
    0 points
  3. It's the tank from Indiana Jones and the last crusade.. So not a real one, but made up That was before it was restored, some pics: https://www.parkeology.com/2011/04/indiana-jones-and-boneyard-tank.html
    0 points
  4. Bavarian army truck picture for sale on ebay germany
    0 points
  5. HI Everybody FINALLY!! the tyres are here in the UK! I have fitted over a dozen already and they look and feel great. they do fit onto British rims with plenty of tyre lube 🙂 They are £300 each including a tube and flap. collection from Bristol or Portsmouth of we can ship at cost (UK pallet usually £90) Either PM me on here or drop me an email armytyres@gmail.com We also have 7.50-20 Bar Grip, 8 ply, @ £135 each inc tube and flap 6.00-16 bar grip 8 ply @ £80 each inc tube and flap.
    0 points
  6. Had a productive morning with Basil as he chose to come into work instead of domestic chores which meant we got the job done in half the time . All the windows got a lick of undercoat ready for topcoat next .
    0 points
  7. I would guess it is from a British 1930s light truck. The bigger manufacturers tended to make their own (particularly Ford) so that just leaves a couple of hundred possibilities. Someone will really need it but how do you find them ? David
    0 points
  8. 61 on a light green square is the company marking within the infantry brigade, ie green square is infantry, 61 is the company, but you need the army group insignia to go with it. Example. 61 light green square with the dessert rat insignia would read as follows. Dessert rats put it in the 21st army group, which is attached to the 8th army. light green square makes it infantry therefore 131 infantry brigade which is the infantry attached to 8th army, 61 makes it the senior rifle battalion of the 1/6th Queen's. now you need the bridge sign and platoon markings if used. Easy to follow these signs on British kit, all you need to do to understand them in seconds is to sit in a slit trench with live rounds coming in, you will soon learn to recognise British kit. You will also find the issue tiolet paper does have it uses. Hope this helps and by the way before D.Day and after D day may be different as units reformed.
    0 points
  9. It's the little bits that always take the most time and effort, you spend ages and seem to nowhere
    0 points
  10. Photo opportunity moved the body this evening over to our main workshop as this is the first Saturday we are not working so I can fit the top deck handrails.Paint is nearly there with a couple more coats of white are needed.
    0 points
  11. Ok then, we went the extra mile ! Unfortunately Mr Colchester does not have a rest, so Stan improvised with a file and some abrasives and very soon we had a much closer representation of the original. I suppose you'll be wanting a bigger handle now ! It is interesting to see how this post Edwardian item has been slimmed down, presumably for economy reasons. ( Tap shown upside down for effect.)
    0 points
  12. Slowly but surely it’s coming back to life, more paint definitely needed.
    0 points
  13. Had the very rusty and dirty transmission Brake Shaft and its attachments sand blasted today so that we could more easily see what is there. prior to it being dismantled.
    0 points
  14. Dad has been down to the foundry to collect some bits
    0 points
  15. Wish I had seen these posts sooner! Just so everyone knows, he's still at it! Signed a contract with him last November for a military vehicle, $12,000 deposit. He's been in and out of touch since then stringing us along and now seems to have disappeared for good. Guess it's time to take it to the legal system, wish me luck! Don't make the same mistake I did, DON'T DO BUSINESS WITH GRZEGORZ WOLSZTYNIAK - FOURTANKMEN!
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...