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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/09/2020 in all areas

  1. Absolutely stunning! The same applies to the Ransomes, that was one of my favourites at the GDSF 2018. Many thanks for sharing.
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  2. I take my hat off to you, this is what its all about. Preserving our motoring heritage. Kevin
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  3. Meant to say the lower internal panels on the front bulkhead are still wearing original paint which I intend to leave. Started to sort out wheels ready for new tyres which I have decided to go down the plastic route .The rear axle will be a combination of the one which we had shipped as it has the top casting for the diff with the possibility of using the whole axle minus the wheels as it is from a later CK model ,shame the diff isn’t in any of them but I have a plan 🤓.Initially thought we were fine for wheels and axle s but we have just about scrapped parts off every axle we have to make a complete set inc the brass tags as the newness was gone for some reason!
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  4. We need two new Radiator Filler Caps - one was missing from one Radiator and we suspect the one on the American Radiator is not "Peerless" and has come from something else. The Filler "necks" are good enough to use again so it is just the caps to make. One piece of bronze required, just long enough to accommodate both caps and with enough to hold on to so that they can be machined back to back with enough to hold on to whilst they are machined one at a time. The thread is nominally 2 1/2" x 16 tpi but we did not notice initially that the "necks" were tapered - about 8 thous from top to bottom of the thread so cutting the thread was a little more difficult than first anticipated. The first cap now screws down easily after some subsequent "adjustment" but tightens up comfortably as it reaches the bottom of the male thread. Now has to be reversed it in the lathe - do the second one -part them of and machine the big "hex's" on the tops.
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  5. I have not done any research yet.
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  6. So I have had an adventurous time with the Renault engine over the last two days. I have no information on the engine and have never worked on one with a separate crank case but how difficult can it be!! The main bearing locating pegs are in the sump half so the crank shaft must be assembled with its con rods first then, with its bearings, dropped into the sump. The crank case is surprisingly heavy for cast aluminium so has a tendency to drop suddenly when the two long centre main bearing studs are located in the holes in the sump. I did all this after I had used instant gasket on the flanges. I did up the main bearing nuts and the twelve sump flange nuts and bolts. It was only then that I noticed that one of the con rods, instead of coming up through its designated hole in the crank case top, was poking out of the hole for the cam followers. I removed the whole lot once more and, by means of a cunning set of pieces of string through the little ends, I got it re-assembled and buttoned up. I knew that the oil pump drive shaft had to be loosely dropped onto its hole before the cam shaft went in so I approached the engine with this and found that it has to go in the sump half before the crank case is lowered on as it will not pass through the top deck. I undid it all once more. The oil pump drive shaft now in place in the sump, I assembled the crank case once more and buttoned it all up. I fitted and timed the camshaft. All the while I had a bad feeling. There was a spare cog that the chap who sold me the car told me was a spare timing cog. I was puzzled as I could neither see where it might go, nor could I see what it might mesh with nor could I think of anything that needs driving other than the oil pump and magneto, both of which are catered for. Then the penny dropped, the cog was not supposed to mesh with anything. In fact it is an oil thrower to be fitted to the back end of the crank shaft. I stripped the engine once more and fitted it. It was a rattling good fit as the machining of the rear main bearing surface had also reduced the diameter of the crankshaft where the thrower was supposed to be a press fit. I used some Locktite but am certain that at some future time I will be posting news that I have had to take the engine out in order to fit the thrower more positively. I am now making a missing brass plug that is suppose to enclose the front end of the camshaft.
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  7. A few updated photos of my willing helpers never say “your bored “during lockdown .Amazing how much rubbing down you can get done 😁
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  8. A little progress over the week end. There was a hole in the cast aluminium sump where the engine had obviously been stored against something metallic that had reacted with the aluminium. I had been pondering on how to fix this and was coming to the conclusion that patching it would be safest. However, I had some Lumiweld sticks around so decided to give it a try. I used a propane blow lamp and played it on the sump for a very long time before it was up to temperature for the repair. It is quite difficult to get the Lumiweld to wet the surface of the aluminium but persistence and lots of scratching the surface through the molten Lumiweld, using the stainless steel wire supplied, managed to do it.
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  9. It's that time again. This week's progress has largely been about cleaning and painting front axle parts. Don't be fooled by the bright sunshine in the first few pictures - these were taken last week but somehow didn't make it into the post. Near side hub-cap removed. End of near side stub axle exposed, also eccentric oil groove cut in the end of the hardened steel knave. Stub axle with flat for grease distribution, also thrust bearing. Note the absence of felt oil seals, compared to the Leyland for example. Near side front wheel ready for paraffin washing. And the same again; this time the off side front wheel. These parts had clearly been sand blasted back in the 70s and with several coats of paint, all that was required was paraffin washing, sanding down and repainting. Small parts - hub caps, king pin covers, greasers, pins, spring hanging links have also been prepped and painted. Above and below: first coat red oxide primer. The ever-so-helpful wheel stand was brought back inside and now supports both front wheels. These are receiving the same treatment. Getting a bit crowded in the workshop, so the easiest way to manoeuvre the off side front wheel was to lift it clear over the top of the stand... ...before guiding it onto the end of the tube. Prepped and in first coat oxide. Note the jubilee clips to stop the wheels trying to escape!
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