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WW1 Thornycroft restoration

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Thanks Ed!

It is a real pain living 200 miles from the project as I can't nip out and do some little job. They all have to be planned in for the occasional visits. Oh well. I have now completed the last pattern, number 32. The is for the hot air duct elbow which mounts on top of the exhaust maniflod and directs hot air into the carburettor. It is not needed with volatile modern fuels but we will fit it for completion sake.DSCN5786.JPG.1d2e1cf0a02c63193cbc8ff37827848b.JPG

Firstly , the elbow. I have tried Terry Harper's recommended procedure of turning up a doughnut shape and then cutting it into chunks before gluing the bits together into an elbow.

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Glued up and on the flange, previously cut from MDF.

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Then a quick rummage for a chunk of hardwood for the main part of it.

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MDF again for the flange on which the HT lead tube is mounted.

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Glue up and some filler for the corners.

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Twenty minutes with the Dremel and some sanding drums to dress.

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Drill through the core prints for some location pegs.

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And saw it in half. I don't like this bit!

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I attached some thin ply to both surfaces to allow for the material lost to the saw cut.

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Dress off with the Dremel again.

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More MDF glued up to make the core box.

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Marked out.

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Drill the straight bits in the lathe. The green tape is my depth stop.

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One hole began to tear a bit as it went over the joint line. It is not as serious as it looks.

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Work the curve out with a small gouge and a cardboard template.

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A bit of glass paper to finish.

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Two coats of Bondaprime and that is the last pattern, thank goodness. I am a metal worker really....

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Well, my Thornycroft 'To-Do' list here in Leicester is now empty. We plan to put the fuel tank back over Christmas and make up the toolbox ready for the painting department. Father can also take this pattern to the foundry in the new year so we are all but there. The Peerless beckons!

Steve    :) 

Edited by Old Bill
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Excellent work as usual . I dont know how you manage being so far away from the truck .My workshop is about 50 foot from my machine shop and I moan about how many times in a day that I walk between the 2.

Mike 

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It's nice to see these moulds made. We had some in the museum collection. I have a huge transmission bearing completely made in wood even the screws. It was painted to look like cast iron.

Edited by Citroman

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We refitted the Thornycroft fuel tank after the rebuild, fitted the petrol tap, changed the jet on the carb and fitted instruction plate. A few less parts on the floor to trip over.

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Boxing Day was a very appropriate time to start work on the tool box. This goes at the rear of the lorry underneath the body. As we were in a bit of a hurry to get the lorry finished we left this until last. It has become quite apparent that making the toolbox first before putting on the body would have been the easiest option as it has become quite awkward to do. The aim is to now cut the wood to size, drill the holes, test fit, remove, paint then reassemble. It is proving to be a lengthy process so far.

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The timber has all been cut to size and the toolbox assembled in situ. It was then dismantled and will be painted. Will it still fit after painting - probably not. 

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I hope all the 'woodworking' hasn't put off the grand ride out for the Thornycroft proposed for this holiday period? Although I can imagine your reluctance if the weather is anything like where we are - cold, windy, wet and miserable. Good luck, Barry.

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As you can see above, Dad now has a kit of parts for the toolbox to paint, along with the rear lamp bracket. I fitted some hooks under the body this morning before leaving so now it is only a paint and assemble job and we can call it 'finished'. Then it is onto the next one in earnest.

We haven't taken it out this break. The weather is OK but the lack of light is offputting and this time of year also results in a constant stream of visitors which is very nice but distracting. Back to reality shortly but at least it will be a short week!

Happy New Year everyone!

Steve   :) 

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Dad is still keeping going, trying to wrap the job up. He has picked up the last casting, the hot air duct elbow and dressed it up. No idea why the original was in gunmetal!DSCN7269.JPG.cb56e6a6bf544d8c378cf5d2c622864c.JPG

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A trial fit didn't look good but I pointed out that I had been unable to bend the tube tightly enough and the bend was sitting on top of the exhaust shield. The pipe is wrong, not the casting!

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He therefore bore the casting true and has left me to fix the pipe!

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The HT lead pipe is secured with a simple brass strap.

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Looks OK!

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Well, that is the last casting. Dad has also been painting the tool box bits ready for assembly the next time we can get to Devon.

Steve   :) 

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1 hour ago, Old Bill said:

Dad is still keeping going, trying to wrap the job up. He has picked up the last casting, the hot air duct elbow and dressed it up. No idea why the original was in gunmetal!

 

 

 

A trial fit didn't look good but I pointed out that I had been unable to bend the tube tightly enough and the bend was sitting on top of the exhaust shield. The pipe is wrong, not the casting!

 

He therefore bore the casting true and has left me to fix the pipe!

 

The HT lead pipe is secured with a simple brass strap.

 

 

 

 

 

Looks OK!

 

Well, that is the last casting. Dad has also been painting the tool box bits ready for assembly the next time we can get to Devon.

Steve   :) 

Another work of art, well done to all !

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Hi would anyone on here be interested in looking at a early Thornycroft lorry located in Leicestershire.  It still has its original timber carriage body fitted.  I can post pictures

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Posted (edited)

I have been fortunate to be able to visit Devon again, this time with the aim of finishing off some loose ends on the Thornycroft. Dad has been painting the toolbox components.

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We wangled the floor in where it hooked between the chassis rails.

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The end panels and the centre divider locked it into place and were then screwed in to secure.

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The door frame needed a piece behind to act as a rebate for the door.

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Unfortunately for me, Thornycrofts used some fancy hasps and staples so I had to reshape some commercial ones which Dad then painted.

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The door panel was then simply screwed to the face of the box. It is not a very secure arrangement as anyone could get in with just a screwdriver. It does give us some space for a tow rope though.

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I took the opportunity to fit the rear lamp bracket which Father has painted along with a nice lamp that he has put together from the remains of several.

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I have also fitted a fire blanket box underneath the seat. I may be paranoid but having 30 gallons of petrol over ones knees whilst sitting in a wooden lorry does feel like pushing one's luck and I have heard of several of this era vehicle catching fire. £10 well spent I think.

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Not much left to do now!

Steve  :)

Edited by Old Bill
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It is those small safety factors that are important to those travelling in the vehicle. Placing the blanket under the seat could be troublesome if there are a number of people in the cab and accessing the blanket could be delayed. If positioned elsewhere it becomes too visible and outside of the realm of authenticity. Like having a modern fire extinguisher on board, where does it go for ease of access, yet not destroy the originality of the vehicle.

 Doug W

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Hi Doug.

 

Both are under the seat so at least we have them with us. It is a simple flip-up so if everyone stands I can get straight in from the passenger side. Not perfect but better than nothing.

Steve :)

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Still trying to finish the thing off! Dad has made a lovely job of cleaning up the hot air duct elbow. However, when we tried to fit it, it became obvious that the the HT lead tube was a bit on the short side and fouled the manifold before falling low enough to go into the casting.

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The solution to that was to cut the tube at the point where it is secured and extend it by 3/4".

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Once cut short, it fitted well.

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As is my wont, I planned to silver solder in an extension piece so I cut a slice of tube and skimmed the ends square in the lathe.

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Aligning the thing whilst soldering would be the big challenge so I rummaged in the oddments box and found some brass angle.

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Some careful wedging

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 and a bit of heat and away we went.

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Then I just had to file the angles off. It didn't come out quite as neatly as I had hoped but it will do. I didn't want to sleeve it inside as that would provide an obstruction for the HT leads and it is already very tight in there.

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A bit of Brasso and it is ready for refitting the next time I go down south.

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We really will have to give it a test run soon.

Steve  :)

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Steve,

Nice work on the pattern! I am glad the "Donut" method worked for you!

Rather than having to cut the patterns in half and worry about fudging it - what I do is glue the halves together with a piece of brown wrapping paper in between before turning. It holds the halves together while you shape them and finish them. Then they are easily split apart using a knife to gently pry with. Since all the pieces of the pattern are done this way you are assured to follow the part line exactly.

In the photo below you can see one of the halves of the  thru pipe with some of the paper still attached after splitting. In this case I only needed to hold the two halves of stock together for turning in the lathe. To the right you can see the turned stock for the small core prints - they too were temporarily held together with a strip of brown paper in between.

Again, fantastic work!

Best regards,

Terry

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Thanks Terry. I have read about doing it that way but have never tried it. Must make up a test one first to see how it goes! There will be a number of patterns for the Peerless but hopefully not too many so I will try then. New piston needed first.

Cheers!

Steve  :)

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Spent a nice weekend in Devon. Bit of a gale blowing though. I took the opportunity to fit the HT lead tube and reinstate the leads.

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They all fitted well and held the leads away from the exhaust for the first time so I am pleased with that.

As it hasn't run for six months we couldn't resist it and after putting a couple of gallons in the tank, gave it a swing. Much to our amazement, it fired on the very first revolution and, once warmed through, ran very sweetly. It is obviously looking forward to going out! One more thing to fix was the throttle/advance detent on the steering column. The advance lever didn't lock into the detent the last time out, so it retarded itself and ran really hot until it seized again. I adjusted the casting with a file until it sat better and hopefully, the lever will stay where it is put. Fingers crossed for the next outing, whenever that may be.

We did some Peerless too but I shall post that later.

Steve  :)

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Posted (edited)
Quote

 

Using the magic of modern technology this should hopefully be a clip of it starting for the first time since the rebuild.

 

Edited by Great War truck
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Leaking radiator. hose connection, or over-filled?

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Leaking hose connections. Cannot sort them even with modern clips! We have, at least, put gaskets and sealant under everything this time so it can't run into the sump like before. Any thoughts on what to do about the hoses? Is there a recommended goo we could use?

I have never had much luck in keeping fluids in any of my toys. It seems to be a knack I have yet to master!

Steve  :)

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I'm not a hose expert ( Hoseman, where are you ? ) but there's only a couple of possibilities.  

Either you have too big a size difference between the OD of your connection and the ID of the hose, or your hose is too hard / rigid.  I suppose it could be a combination of both.

A thinner, softer hose would be the easiest fix.  After all, I expect the pressure in the system to be just the hydrostatic head and a couple of PSI.  I'd guess you are using industrial strength hose that would pressure test to hundreds of PSI and is probably twice as thick as it needs to be.  Ask everybody else with similar vehicles what they are using?

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