Jump to content
Great War truck

WW1 Thornycroft restoration

Recommended Posts

On 8/28/2018 at 8:53 AM, monty2 said:

I think you get away with it. I remember the Charterhouse bedford OY we drove in the UK had no problems in the middle of the bridges . You could stand upright in the back.

See photo for the railway tracks Geert ūüėČ

HMVF.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we went to Beaulieu Autojumble last weekend but no great 'finds' unfortunately. We did see lots of friends though and a number from this forum which was wonderful although it is most disconcerting to be recognised! We also met an enthusiast for 'Radmill' lighting equipment. He has a significant collection of them but surprisingly, no gas generator so he was very interested in ours. It seems that ours is a lot rarer than we thought which is interesting to hear although somewhat unfortunate as we want another three! It looks like we will have to make them. Oh well.

We are still making some progress. I started on the headboard in Father's car-port before bringing it back here to Leicester for completion. This is now done and it is ready for the paint shop.

DSCN6516.JPG.f0d8d937a2a196b747e99c2b44b19ffe.JPG

DSCN7738.JPG.caecfcd88d3d3ed1d37ceb0a6e313f1f.JPG

DSCN7739.JPG.fc9caa9934f41bd75969a5f9ba2a752e.JPG

Adrian has very kindly given the sump a light sand blasting so that we can see what we have.

DSCN7742.JPG.e3a35c0ae820ee60da7a3f77a1352125.JPG

It appears to be a casting fault as there are several cold-shuts in the area and possibly a crack along the inside. I made the fatal mistake of poking it with a small screwdriver and going right through!

DSCN7743.JPG.cf312827de97ec78aa71636c289d2691.JPG

DSCN7741.JPG.5ca010229f1002f6b868363b86a9628a.JPG

I have some repair paste but think that a patch might make an appropriate period fix instead. I shall try that solution tomorrow.

On the subject of fuel tank sealant, I have written to the suppliers to see if a second coat would be an acceptable solution. We will have to see what they say.

Steve   :)

Edited by Old Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have managed to do a bit today and have fitted the patch to the sump. It started out as a bit of 20swg copper from the drawer suitably annealed.

DSCN7744.JPG.0a2a262907b29d09b7b5a9974626766b.JPG

Then a bit of tapping around using the bossing mallet and a panel beaters hammer, annealing between each go. I annealed it about twelve times altogether.

DSCN7745.JPG.eb65686e93af6f3bf634593ddb5659ea.JPG

DSCN7746.JPG.64807dcc0713b40c886d4cd17467f397.JPG

I drilled and tapped the casting for 2BA. The casting is horrible in this area, full of porosity and only 1/8" thick.

DSCN7748.JPG.86f58a42ed68e36ad0f3e9ca017b5eab.JPG

Then just screwed it down.

DSCN7750.JPG.f6264096e53f308e928dbc76f966262f.JPG

I shall seal it with modern silicone instant gasket which I think is forgivable in this case but that will have to wait until I get down to Devon again.

Wing mirrors next. It never had any but I have tried driving without and it is scary as hell! They will go on the cab frame under the wing nuts.

Steve   :)

  • Up 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Old Bill said:

I shall seal it with modern silicone instant gasket which I think is forgivable in this case but that will have to wait until I get down to Devon again.

Devcon would be appropriate in Devon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a similar original repair on my jeep block under the distributor boss to repair frost damage. There’s a lot more screws around the perimeter of the applied patch though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This patch isn’t under pressure, only gravity if I’m not mistaken. So I would think 1 in screw in each corner is adequate. 

Edited by lowfat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real problem is going to be getting all the entrapped oil out of the metal. Otherwise the silicon is not going to take. Nor will any other sealant/adhesive etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work! A piece of rubber under the patch will do. I have a very large (vintage) patch like this on my big Wisconsin.

(a large portion of the bottom of the cast aluminum oil pan was smashed out at one time)

If any one asks just tell them its a bullet hole from back in the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, dgrev said:

The real problem is going to be getting all the entrapped oil out of the metal. Otherwise the silicon is not going to take. Nor will any other sealant/adhesive etc.

Something oil-based would work. Maybe a mixture of linseed oil and Whiting. Very age-appropriate. 

(We call it putty now)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if vapour degreasing would clean the entrapped oil out.  Best cleaning system ever made.  Normally found in RAAF (RAF) NDI labs.  The original chemical is banned but I believe they use a replacement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used a Loctite adhesive that worked even if there was a trace of oil or grease ( the Loctite rep told me this and his demonstration sold it to me). It consisted of the adhesive in a tube and a small aerosol which was the activator. It was an excellent permanent joint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Richard Farrant said:

I have used a Loctite adhesive that worked even if there was a trace of oil or grease ( the Loctite rep told me this and his demonstration sold it to me). It consisted of the adhesive in a tube and a small aerosol which was the activator. It was an excellent permanent joint.

What number locktite was it Richard, sounds like a useful thing to have in the toolbox.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go on the Henkel (loctite) web site they have some very detailed explanations of what the products can achieve and in what environments. The chemical industry has come on a long way since the days of these vehicles and sometimes the old ways are no longer best.

who in WW2 would have thought gluing aluminium together was a good idea?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, armouredfarmer said:

What number locktite was it Richard, sounds like a useful thing to have in the toolbox.

 

i am not sure of the number off the top of my head, but think it also had a name, could have been Multibond. Apparantly it was used by truck manufacturers to bond body panels on cabs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have many years ago used a Locktite thread locking product that was not affected by oil on the parts. It literally got under the oil and pushed it away from the surface. You could even apply it after the bolts had been torqued up and it still worked. Great stuff. It works by wetting the surface better than the oil does in the same way that oil wets the surface better than water does, which is why water will not wash oil off a surface completely. Excellent idea Richard.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the sump is very thin, you may have a problem with vibration and the screws when the engine is running. Why not put another patch on the inside and bolt through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Richard Farrant said:

 

i am not sure of the number off the top of my head, but think it also had a name, could have been Multibond. Apparantly it was used by truck manufacturers to bond body panels on cabs.

Possible multi bond 330 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that one has prompted some discussion!

As it is non-structural and not pressurized, I think that four screws will be enough. I can always add more if necessary. With only four, however, I won't be able to get a good pressure on a gasket, rubber or otherwise so I think I will go for the liquid solution. Silicone seems pretty good but I will have to clean the surface fairly well. I shall use cellulose thinners to get a good clean ring around the hole. Oil in the hole won't matter too much as I am not trying to fill it. As long as I can get a continuous ring around the hole, I am sure it will be fine.

Many thanks for all of your thoughts!

Steve   :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Old Bill said:

Well, that one has prompted some discussion!

As it is non-structural and not pressurized, I think that four screws will be enough. I can always add more if necessary. With only four, however, I won't be able to get a good pressure on a gasket, rubber or otherwise so I think I will go for the liquid solution. Silicone seems pretty good but I will have to clean the surface fairly well. I shall use cellulose thinners to get a good clean ring around the hole. Oil in the hole won't matter too much as I am not trying to fill it. As long as I can get a continuous ring around the hole, I am sure it will be fine.

Many thanks for all of your thoughts!

Steve   :) 

Steve,

Just a small point, if you were intending to paint the sump in service colour as original. The paint will not adhere over silicon and will 'siss' or fish eye in that area. Just saying.

Tomo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Chrisg said:

Possible multi bond 330 

Chris,

That sounds like it! Bloody good stuff, it worked very well and extremely strong bond.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Old Bill said:

As it is non-structural and not pressurized, I think that four screws will be enough. I can always add more if necessary. With only four, however, I won't be able to get a good pressure on a gasket, rubber

Steve, 

Have you thought of making a patch for the inside to match the outer one, then you can bolt the 'sandwich' together? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think it really needs a patch on the inside as the surface is so much better. I only need to block the hole. I could nut it on the inside if it does work loose.

Not come across 'Tigerseal' before. I shall Google it!

Steve   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


√ó
√ó
  • Create New...