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Great War truck

WW1 Thornycroft restoration

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Thanks Ed!

It is a real pain living 200 miles from the project as I can't nip out and do some little job. They all have to be planned in for the occasional visits. Oh well. I have now completed the last pattern, number 32. The is for the hot air duct elbow which mounts on top of the exhaust maniflod and directs hot air into the carburettor. It is not needed with volatile modern fuels but we will fit it for completion sake.DSCN5786.JPG.1d2e1cf0a02c63193cbc8ff37827848b.JPG

Firstly , the elbow. I have tried Terry Harper's recommended procedure of turning up a doughnut shape and then cutting it into chunks before gluing the bits together into an elbow.

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Glued up and on the flange, previously cut from MDF.

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Then a quick rummage for a chunk of hardwood for the main part of it.

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MDF again for the flange on which the HT lead tube is mounted.

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Glue up and some filler for the corners.

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Twenty minutes with the Dremel and some sanding drums to dress.

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Drill through the core prints for some location pegs.

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And saw it in half. I don't like this bit!

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I attached some thin ply to both surfaces to allow for the material lost to the saw cut.

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Dress off with the Dremel again.

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More MDF glued up to make the core box.

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Marked out.

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Drill the straight bits in the lathe. The green tape is my depth stop.

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One hole began to tear a bit as it went over the joint line. It is not as serious as it looks.

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Work the curve out with a small gouge and a cardboard template.

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A bit of glass paper to finish.

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Two coats of Bondaprime and that is the last pattern, thank goodness. I am a metal worker really....

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Well, my Thornycroft 'To-Do' list here in Leicester is now empty. We plan to put the fuel tank back over Christmas and make up the toolbox ready for the painting department. Father can also take this pattern to the foundry in the new year so we are all but there. The Peerless beckons!

Steve    :) 

Edited by Old Bill
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Excellent work as usual . I dont know how you manage being so far away from the truck .My workshop is about 50 foot from my machine shop and I moan about how many times in a day that I walk between the 2.

Mike 

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It's nice to see these moulds made. We had some in the museum collection. I have a huge transmission bearing completely made in wood even the screws. It was painted to look like cast iron.

Edited by Citroman

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We refitted the Thornycroft fuel tank after the rebuild, fitted the petrol tap, changed the jet on the carb and fitted instruction plate. A few less parts on the floor to trip over.

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Boxing Day was a very appropriate time to start work on the tool box. This goes at the rear of the lorry underneath the body. As we were in a bit of a hurry to get the lorry finished we left this until last. It has become quite apparent that making the toolbox first before putting on the body would have been the easiest option as it has become quite awkward to do. The aim is to now cut the wood to size, drill the holes, test fit, remove, paint then reassemble. It is proving to be a lengthy process so far.

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The timber has all been cut to size and the toolbox assembled in situ. It was then dismantled and will be painted. Will it still fit after painting - probably not. 

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I hope all the 'woodworking' hasn't put off the grand ride out for the Thornycroft proposed for this holiday period? Although I can imagine your reluctance if the weather is anything like where we are - cold, windy, wet and miserable. Good luck, Barry.

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As you can see above, Dad now has a kit of parts for the toolbox to paint, along with the rear lamp bracket. I fitted some hooks under the body this morning before leaving so now it is only a paint and assemble job and we can call it 'finished'. Then it is onto the next one in earnest.

We haven't taken it out this break. The weather is OK but the lack of light is offputting and this time of year also results in a constant stream of visitors which is very nice but distracting. Back to reality shortly but at least it will be a short week!

Happy New Year everyone!

Steve   :) 

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Dad is still keeping going, trying to wrap the job up. He has picked up the last casting, the hot air duct elbow and dressed it up. No idea why the original was in gunmetal!DSCN7269.JPG.cb56e6a6bf544d8c378cf5d2c622864c.JPG

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A trial fit didn't look good but I pointed out that I had been unable to bend the tube tightly enough and the bend was sitting on top of the exhaust shield. The pipe is wrong, not the casting!

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He therefore bore the casting true and has left me to fix the pipe!

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The HT lead pipe is secured with a simple brass strap.

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Looks OK!

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Well, that is the last casting. Dad has also been painting the tool box bits ready for assembly the next time we can get to Devon.

Steve   :) 

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1 hour ago, Old Bill said:

Dad is still keeping going, trying to wrap the job up. He has picked up the last casting, the hot air duct elbow and dressed it up. No idea why the original was in gunmetal!

 

 

 

A trial fit didn't look good but I pointed out that I had been unable to bend the tube tightly enough and the bend was sitting on top of the exhaust shield. The pipe is wrong, not the casting!

 

He therefore bore the casting true and has left me to fix the pipe!

 

The HT lead pipe is secured with a simple brass strap.

 

 

 

 

 

Looks OK!

 

Well, that is the last casting. Dad has also been painting the tool box bits ready for assembly the next time we can get to Devon.

Steve   :) 

Another work of art, well done to all !

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