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WW1 Thornycroft restoration

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Posted (edited)

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It took me ages to find that grip strip for the Loyd drivers footrests.  In the end I found it as my local fab shop who had made some mezzanine stairs, for which its used as grip strip at the edge, hence 'nosing'.  They found three one metre lengths in there off-cuts bin for me.

Edited by ajmac

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Didn't realise that tread stuff was called pyramid nosing. Anyway I got loads of 5 metre lengths for my timber tractor a couple of years ago from Albert Jagger Ltd 01922 471000 or www.albert-jagger.co.uk  they do all sorts of mouldings and brackets etc for truck body building

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18 hours ago, Old Bill said:

A million hits? Good heavens!

It's probably about 20 lunatics reading it 50,000 times. :-)

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Well, there is Ben, Me and you, so we only need 17 more to make the numbers up!

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39 minutes ago, Asciidv said:

Well, there is Ben, Me and you, so we only need 17 more to make the numbers up!

Only 16 needed now.

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Confirms me as a lunatic as well!

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+1 :thumbsup:

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This is all getting a bit 'Monty Python' I feel!

WHilst putting the footbrake together, I realised that I had given Dad a wrong dimension and that the pull rod he had made was too short. I have, therefore, made up a slightly longer one.

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Meanwhile, Dad has picked up the horrible job of cleaning up the bonnet for painting.

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He tells me that everything is now pink! Hopefully, he will be able to get the first coat of Bondaprime on tomorrow.

I have been finishing off the differential spider. First job was to modify the drilling jig so that it would fit over the casting.

DSCN7566.JPG.7f9fd323e9c3e123fb038cf8feddc178.JPG

Then I used the optical centre punch to pick up on the circle that Father had scribed on the back when he turned it.

DSCN7567.JPG.b7fc6767fb6b00f26c776ed02f500ac3.JPG

Then just drill through in the mill, one step at a time. The holes are not to size yet as I don't have a reaming size drill for 5/8" dia. There is one on order and I hope to get it tomorrow.

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Lamp brackets next!

Steve  :)

 

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On ‎10‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 9:58 AM, Grasshopper said:

Pyramid nosing (which I didn't know the name of) is used extensively on ex London Transport busses (think RT, RF vintage). 

AEC lorry cabs had it in the 50's and 60's as well.

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Back in the day it was used almost universally on trucks and buses. I must have trodden on the stuff literally millions of times but never gave a thought to what it was called.

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I check your thread everyday, its the only thing I open HMVF for nowadays, sadly you are nearing completion which unless you guys have another project in the wings will be the end of an era :-(

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Posted (edited)

This as the Great man said, is only the end of the beginning. This illustrious team may have another project waiting in the wings but this vehicle and team now have a future to be reported on together. I have looked forward to each enstallment with eager antisipation, it is not only about the truck its about the people as well, behind the hands on workers there must be a moral support team we have to thank them as well for our entertainment. I hope that the team take time and enjoy the vehicle before taking on anything else. There are also Bedford, Dodge, Dennis, Militant, Simitar, to name just a few of the other restorations going on in various places around the world. Also bikes and cars so plenty of work to see the progress on, and the different ways of overcoming tin worm problems  

Edited by john1950
addition

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1 hour ago, ajmac said:

I check your thread everyday, its the only thing I open HMVF for nowadays, sadly you are nearing completion which unless you guys have another project in the wings will be the end of an era :-(

Have you seen the (extremely similar) 1914 Dennis and 1908 Dennis threads? Whilst the 1914 is approaching completion, the 1908 looks like it has plenty of time to run. 

(I feel something of a link to the 1908, I first saw it in-situ under the house where it was entombed) 

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Don't worry guys, they have a rather nice chassis / cab Peerless  waiting in the wings and another in kit form to use any parts left over from the first. Our evenings are secure for some time !

David

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Posted (edited)

....and relax......But the other WW1 threads are good too Andy, I shouldn't take away from those.

Edited by ajmac

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count me in as one of the 20 lunatics 

 

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We are very glad that you are enjoying it all. We like having you along for the ride as it gives us another incentive to keep at it. This part of the project is getting hard to maintain and it would be very easy to stop without your support so thank you for that. Just on three weeks to go!

The progress chart is not doing very well so to help things along, I have moved the final target by taking off evry task we can manage without. That gives us the red line as the final target assuming that we don't fit the tool box, the petrol tin brackets, the shovel bracket and so on. Nothing will be wrong. It is just that some bits won't be there! Too many items will be fitted in the final few days but we should do it. (fingers are crossed at this point....)

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Anyway, my new drill turned up today so I have drilled and reamed the holes in the differential spider.

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The reamer, by the way, was a gift from a work colleague which was very kind. However, he had been using it to stir paint so it took some serious cleaning up!

DSCN7578.JPG.dce8ee5bcf1feb3c522c153c1ed948fe.JPG

Spider is now complete and ticked off the list. Lamp brackets tomorrow.

Steve   :)

 

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Something else we could manage without are the sidelamp brackets. However, they are very much part of the appearance of the lorry so I have been pushing on wiuth them. We are fortunate to have one original bracket. However, it had been squeezed up to carry an electric lamp and also snapped off and welded at some point.It looks very much like a casting to me although it could be a forging. It is quite sifficult to see how it was made. However, if a casting, I felt that my chances of bedning it back without snapping it were slim. However, I had to have a go.

DSCN6554.JPG.6a89c7871a298bf8f8669047773995af.JPG

I tried bending it red hot in the vice using an adjustable spammer for leverage. Amazingly, I got away with it.

DSCN6555.JPG.bf0f5b87c4c6673f6872f7781e8eef69.JPG

And he second bend.

DSCN6556.JPG.e77fcedeb6c8517cf04d4f68eabc4089.JPG

To flatted nt eshank, I put it in the press where I could control the force nicely.

DSCN6558.JPG.df66fe6a1be26b5000d54991f578cac0.JPG

Well, that was a bit of luck. I was expecting to ruin it but in the end, it came out OK and I only had to make one more. I had some pices laser cut or, I suspect, plasma cut as the main part is 15mm and quite tapered.

DSCN7559.JPG.928efbc024945e3d1e55164ea85d9e6e.JPG

It is elliptical in section so a lot of angle grinding and filing later, we had this.

DSCN7562.JPG.430f09ccd0947629b9480447513fe976.JPG

DSCN7563.JPG.af7eada2c7a20440e1a67285fb7280b8.JPG

I also filed the edges of the back plate and cut the straight piece to go in between. This, I did by hand and then again, filed elliptical.

DSCN7560.JPG.850c5045fdd173e14964990d3f05b52c.JPG

DSCN7561.JPG.0d7539f3ae3d00de93183feb91d2b510.JPG

DSCN7569.JPG.57a729dcc9c740badf63ec657aac9e65.JPG

Next challenge was to work out how to bend it.

DSCN7570.JPG.27d0272f5cdda30accf8b2e5b38a1f4f.JPG

In the end, I put it in the press and bent it cold, a little bit at a time and by eye.

DSCN7571.JPG.6d667c35306257c6304ae53fbff443ec.JPG

DSCN7572.JPG.70b8d6f53f4edf08a6af3e8aa90e6855.JPG

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It came out OK but the surface suffered a lot of bruising which I had to file out afterwards.

DSCN7574.JPG.2f2c9127167f8720d4cfd858d3a94665.JPG

DSCN7575.JPG.6054c4c5bd1e13c5d887ecbe824f839d.JPG

The holes were drilled for pegs to be located in the top. The pegs were later silver soldered into position.

DSCN7580.JPG.c135caa9a5e0423becafdab55116cfb5.JPG

All set up for welding.

DSCN7581.JPG.a416b10128e52a9a9dc68f179491cd26.JPG

My welding is still abysmal!

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Thank goodness for angle grinders and filler!

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Whilst the filler was going off, I cut the damaged pegs from the original bracket and drilled for new ones. It drilled like cast iron and I am amazed that I managed to bend it without it snapping.

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After dressing of the filler and another round of filing and polishing, we have a pair of brackets. Very fortunately, I welded the second to be a mirror image of the first, not a direct copy!

DSCN7591.JPG.8bda54a0b67ecceac04ce065409b7e1d.JPG

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Even the pegs are the right distance apart.

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Into the paint shop tomorrow.

Steve   :)

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My best guess on the original is that it is, literally, wrought iron.  Not the more common mild steel that we call wrought iron these days.  That's why you were able to straighten it.

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14 hours ago, Old Bill said:

Something else we could manage without are the sidelamp brackets. However, they are very much part of the appearance of the lorry so I have been pushing on wiuth them. We are fortunate to have one original bracket. However, it had been squeezed up to carry an electric lamp and also snapped off and welded at some point.It looks very much like a casting to me although it could be a forging. It is quite sifficult to see how it was made. However, if a casting, I felt that my chances of bedning it back without snapping it were slim. However, I had to have a go.

DSCN6554.JPG.6a89c7871a298bf8f8669047773995af.JPG

I tried bending it red hot in the vice using an adjustable spammer for leverage. Amazingly, I got away with it.

DSCN6555.JPG.bf0f5b87c4c6673f6872f7781e8eef69.JPG

And he second bend.

DSCN6556.JPG.e77fcedeb6c8517cf04d4f68eabc4089.JPG

To flatted nt eshank, I put it in the press where I could control the force nicely.

DSCN6558.JPG.df66fe6a1be26b5000d54991f578cac0.JPG

Well, that was a bit of luck. I was expecting to ruin it but in the end, it came out OK and I only had to make one more. I had some pices laser cut or, I suspect, plasma cut as the main part is 15mm and quite tapered.

DSCN7559.JPG.928efbc024945e3d1e55164ea85d9e6e.JPG

It is elliptical in section so a lot of angle grinding and filing later, we had this.

DSCN7562.JPG.430f09ccd0947629b9480447513fe976.JPG

DSCN7563.JPG.af7eada2c7a20440e1a67285fb7280b8.JPG

I also filed the edges of the back plate and cut the straight piece to go in between. This, I did by hand and then again, filed elliptical.

DSCN7560.JPG.850c5045fdd173e14964990d3f05b52c.JPG

DSCN7561.JPG.0d7539f3ae3d00de93183feb91d2b510.JPG

DSCN7569.JPG.57a729dcc9c740badf63ec657aac9e65.JPG

Next challenge was to work out how to bend it.

DSCN7570.JPG.27d0272f5cdda30accf8b2e5b38a1f4f.JPG

In the end, I put it in the press and bent it cold, a little bit at a time and by eye.

DSCN7571.JPG.6d667c35306257c6304ae53fbff443ec.JPG

DSCN7572.JPG.70b8d6f53f4edf08a6af3e8aa90e6855.JPG

DSCN7573.JPG.a1f65701f28512651574fb9c99f15553.JPG

It came out OK but the surface suffered a lot of bruising which I had to file out afterwards.

DSCN7574.JPG.2f2c9127167f8720d4cfd858d3a94665.JPG

DSCN7575.JPG.6054c4c5bd1e13c5d887ecbe824f839d.JPG

The holes were drilled for pegs to be located in the top. The pegs were later silver soldered into position.

DSCN7580.JPG.c135caa9a5e0423becafdab55116cfb5.JPG

All set up for welding.

DSCN7581.JPG.a416b10128e52a9a9dc68f179491cd26.JPG

My welding is still abysmal!

DSCN7582.JPG.ee12370b9c7013605487655b8bb68f79.JPG

DSCN7583.JPG.9e90526c3b98fd1216983494b3dedb75.JPG

Thank goodness for angle grinders and filler!

DSCN7584.JPG.b76bb0471441a4f072dd899df0adf391.JPG

DSCN7587.JPG.e99b320a7f86b1206aab3e2958caa7e4.JPG

Whilst the filler was going off, I cut the damaged pegs from the original bracket and drilled for new ones. It drilled like cast iron and I am amazed that I managed to bend it without it snapping.

DSCN7585.JPG.a6f2a5d8ff3c5265cf8806a7901227a7.JPG

DSCN7586.JPG.b73f8d6639c180eddca52e63c7ab3a30.JPG

After dressing of the filler and another round of filing and polishing, we have a pair of brackets. Very fortunately, I welded the second to be a mirror image of the first, not a direct copy!

DSCN7591.JPG.8bda54a0b67ecceac04ce065409b7e1d.JPG

DSCN7596.JPG.1ba15af0f9a64a5eac261a837b30bdbb.JPG

Even the pegs are the right distance apart.

DSCN7589.JPG.bc80ea5d1c9a7056d01cf55f18eb4a7a.JPG

Into the paint shop tomorrow.

Steve   :)

What made you think it were cast Steve....?

 

As someone else has said it's likely wrought iron... 

You can tell the difference by braying it with a hammer cold...iron splits into fibres...unlike steel... 

 

They'll have had blacksmiths working at Thornycrofts.... 

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12 minutes ago, flandersflyer said:

What made you think it were cast Steve....?

I must admit that I am not convinced either way at the moment. The item has a very definite split line along it which suggests to me that it is either a casting or a drop forging.

DSCN7559.thumb.JPG.af2fe01be0d8e425ef40fceec733555c.JPG

It was one piece originally although there is a weld repair right in the centre. It drilled like cast iron but I don't know how wrought iron drills. Do you get spiral swarf or chips with wrought iron? It is an unlikely shape for a casting but I also can't see how it would have been forged either. Possibly forge it in two goes at 90° to get the mounting flange and then bend the prongs up as a third operation?

Still a bit of a mystery.

Steve     :huh:

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