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WW1 Thornycroft restoration

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Well, I started the day by finishing off the footstep and brackets. The brackets were identical last night but that didn't make the step horizontal or parallel to the chassis rails! There was quite a lot of fiddling and messing to do before the assembly was just right.DSCN5559.JPG.864905524a89461b6d9517d05e14d2a1.JPG

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This is what we are aiming to reproduce.

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As you can see, there are two very distinctive strips of tread plate with square pimples. I have been unable to find any of this. Does anyone know where I could obtain two 23" lengths of this material please?

Dad carried on with painting the inside of the body, a job which is very hard on the knees and back!

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Then we started on the rear wing brackets.These are awkward as I have no drawings and am puzzling them out as we go along. I had had some plasma cut profiles of the mounting flanges cut and spent a lot of time cleaning them up and breaking the corners to make them look right.

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Then we carried on by propping a rear wing into position.

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Then Father has cut some steel strips which I curved using the press.

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Tomorrow I shall weld them up and we will cut the arms themselves.

We have had a variety of distractions today but hopefully, will be able to get stuck in tomorrow and get them all done. My last day on the job before returning to reality!

Steve   :)  

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Evenin Steve,

 

The only place I have seen that anti slip strip is on the outer diameter of ERF wheel trims from the 1960's, it is where the driver put his foot when getting into the cab, if you know any classic truck enthusiast's they may have a wheel trim with centre damage that they will let go to a worthy cause.

The truck is looking good, nearly there.

 

Andy

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56" here you can have, will cost you a sausage. I can take to Newark auto jumble tomorrow if it helps. 

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Posted (edited)

Mark, where are you ? I am traveling down to Dorset (where the truck is) next week and could possibly pick it up from you as I expect to be going via Hull so will be going down the A1.

David

Edited by David Herbert

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Hello, David, It's Mark Gillatt. Still, at the same place, you came to look at the Cromwell many years ago.

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If it’s the same stuff as used on the drivers footboard of ajmac’s Loyd Carrier resto, it’s called Pyramid Nosing and is used in the fabrication of steel stairways

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Sorry Mark, didn't realise it was you ! I don't know which day yet but could you PM me a phone number and we can talk about it.

David

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9 hours ago, markyakyak said:

56" here you can have, will cost you a sausage. I can take to Newark auto jumble tomorrow if it helps.

Hi Mark.

That's wonderful! Thankyou very much indeed. I have been keeping an eye open for the stuff for ages but have not seen it. It is getting these little details right that is so satisfying in a project like this.

Newark would have been great but I am still in Devon at the moment. I'll drop you a line shortly if you don't come to an arrangement with David. Sausages we can do!

Thanks again,

Steve.

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9 hours ago, simon king said:

If it’s the same stuff as used on the drivers footboard of ajmac’s Loyd Carrier resto, it’s called Pyramid Nosing and is used in the fabrication of steel stairways

So that is what it is called! No wonder I couldn't find it. That is not something I would have guessed!

Thanks!

Steve

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Steve. Pyramid is a possible guess given the shape.

But "nosing" has to be industry jargon  and very unlikely that even with the wealth of knowledge on this forum, anyone would have come up with that term. "Banding", "trim", "grip" maybe, but "nosing", nope, just too obscure.

I am also very surprised the product still exists a hundred years later, who would that predicted that?

The weirdness, seemingly impossible finds and coincidences in our MV hobby never cease to amaze me.

eg. I was talking to a bloke today at the local rubbish dump and he was telling me how he has collected the saddle and accoutrements (sp?) for a light horse soldier. The one thing he had not been able to find despite a long hard search was a mess tin. I said to him that I would be of no help as I would not know one if it fell on my foot. "Well actually one nearly did, you would have walked right by it at that garage sale we were both at 3 weeks ago, I was standing there looking at all the junk and realised at my feet was one in good condition and got it for a couple of bucks".

It is amazing what is still out there, as you have shown many times with your finds.

Regards

Doug

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Pyramid nosing is new to me too. I have always called it 'grip strip' or 'that strip with lots of little bumps' ! The stuff that Mark has is solid rolled strip with the pattern rolled into the top surface and flat on the other side. The WW2 version is rolled out of much thinner sheet metal with the pyramids pushed up from underneath and a flange down both edges for stiffness. I strongly suspect that this lightweight version was a WW2 austerity measure and that the WW1 version was solid like the current stuff. Does anyone have an example that is definitely WW1 that they could check ? It actually makes little difference as you have to look very hard to see which it is once fitted and painted.

Isn't the forum great that within about an hour of Steve menioning that he needed it, someone had offered a piece and delivery over about 200 miles was organised.

David

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Nosing is new to me too, but when I googled pyramid nosing it also showed one which is angled to go over the nose of a stair, which then made sense. As for the forum coming up trumps yet again, it really shows what a great community it is. 

I love this thread, so please, when the Thorny is finished, have a break and start on the next one. Good luck with your quest to get to Brighton.

Steve.

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47 minutes ago, Ex-boy said:

Nosing is new to me too, but when I googled pyramid nosing it also showed one which is angled to go over the nose of a stair, which then made sense.

Here is a supplier:

http://www.fhbrundle.co.uk/products/25NOSE2__Pyramid_Non_slip_Nosing_35_x_5_x_3000mm

I only mention it because the same place does many other useful steel sections and also sells actual wrought iron in strips. (Or at least they did when I bought some, though it is hard to be sure that it isn't just plain mild steel for making "wrought iron" gates.)

 

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54 minutes ago, Ex-boy said:

As for the forum coming up trumps yet again, it really shows what a great community it is.

This it is why it is a shame that some members have left/use the forum less since the format changed. Now I'm used to the new forum, if I was given the choice of bringing back the old one, I would say NO THANK YOU!!

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Match it is a symptom of old age, resistance to new things, be they good or bad.

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2 hours ago, David Herbert said:

 The WW2 version is rolled out of much thinner sheet metal with the pyramids pushed up from underneath and a flange down both edges for stiffness. I strongly suspect that this lightweight version was a WW2 austerity measure and that the WW1 version was solid like the current stuff.

hi David,

I have removed this type of tread strip during restorations on Daimler Dingos and Bedford QL in order to repair the flooring and steps and it was solid, not pressed. Might just be that different manufacturers had varying ways of producing it. The QL step on the front mudguards had two flat pyramid strips and the outer one had. a flange on one side. Dingo ones on floor plates were flat.

regards, Richard

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Thanks Richard,

Frightening that one can make assumptions based on too little evidence. I suppose that I assumed that the pieces that I actually took off were identical to the many that I didn't and as they look the same when covered in paint, that there was no difference. Nice to learn somethng

David

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Pyramid nosing (which I didn't know the name of) is used extensively on ex London Transport busses (think RT, RF vintage). 

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I mentioned previously the similar problem we were experiencing with our 1932 Leyland Cub truck, and it appears to have been solved by fitting hotter spark plugs. Although it seemed to be idling satisfactorily, a close listen at the exhaust revealed otherwise. The hotter plugs have overcome this and the manifold vacuum reading is much better.

Our man recommends you use the hottest plugs you can obtain, as these engines are often run for short periods (not that yours has run for long at all!) and may rarely reach 'self-cleaning' operating temperatures. This results in sooting up rapidly, causing spark leakage over the insulators under cylinder pressures.

Ian

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I logged in this morning and to my amazement, 1,000,018 views !!!!!! Now if that doesn't give you final push to make it to Brighton.

CARRY ON.......

 

 

John G

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Well, that makes it official, the Gosling clan just qualified as HMV royalty. ;-)

London to a brick (or is that Brighton?) you would never have predicted when you started posting to this forum that your quiet restoration efforts would grow to become something avidly watched by people all over the world.

Or that the Thorny restoration would prove more popular than the Dennis.

I wonder which is the bigger surprise?

Carry on chaps, the end is in sight, time to start planning the next restoration.

Edited by dgrev

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3 hours ago, dgrev said:

Well, that makes it official, the Gosling clan just qualified as HMV royalty. ;-)

London to a brick (or is that Brighton?) you would never have predicted when you started posting to this forum that your quiet restoration efforts would grow to become something avidly watched by people all over the world.

Or that the Thorny restoration would prove more popular than the Dennis.

I wonder which is the bigger surprise?

Carry on chaps, the end is in sight, time to start planning the next restoration.

Well, it has been all of a bit of surprise - we never gave it much of a thought that it would have created this amount of interest! We are just so pleased that folks have enjoyed watching  it develop in this way. Whilst there have been three of us at it, it has been very much Steve's project and it is a prime example of the "Apprentice has now become the Master".

And all the way through, there has been a tremendous amount of advice and encouragement from members of the Forum and we have been very grateful to have had that.

And we must acknowledge Jack for it is his Forum that has given us the means to tell the story in this way and we are grateful to him.

Tony

 

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A million hits? Good heavens!

Thanks Chaps!

Steve    :thumbsup:

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10 hours ago, IAN_B said:

Our man recommends you use the hottest plugs you can obtain, as these engines are often run for short periods (not that yours has run for long at all!) and may rarely reach 'self-cleaning' operating temperatures. This results in sooting up rapidly, causing spark leakage over the insulators under cylinder pressures.

Ian

Thanks for that Ian. The plugs we have were recommended by Tim Green of The Green Spark Plug Co so we will have to see how they fare. The engine has only run for fifteen minutes altogether so far so it is a bit soon to judge. I will pack a wire brush for the first outing!

We didn't stop on Sunday but pressed on with the wing irons. These are proving very time consuming and may only be completed the night before. I don't expect them to be on for the test run so lets pray for a dry day!

Started off by welding the bits we made on Saturday.

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Thes actually came out quite well although I did have to re-weld a couple of them. We then progressed to bending the main rod part. These are 1" diameter and so had to be done hot.

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Dropped in the hardy hole in the anvil and with a piece of scaffold tube, were soon bent.

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We did two nose-to-nose to make bending easier.

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After cutting in two and a bit of dressing, I tacked the first one up.

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It came out OK so now we need to do the rest, fully weld them and dress them back. I think the dressing back may be omitted for the time being.

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Meanwhile, Dad has been painting and has primed the footstep and brackets.

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I am doing a few bits here in Leicester ready for my next trip down south.

It is going to be a very close run thing!

Steve    :)

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