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Radio Traffic/Chatter

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Hi everyone. I am requesting assistance if at all possible?

I am looking for a cd/ tape of Military Radio traffic for a Display. Anyone copied anything from an Excersise or got anything like that?

I need it to play through an extention speaker from the vehicle at displays to represent radio traffic as though it was live.

Obviously, I am willing to pay expenses for this item if you would be kind enough to help me out.

The vehicle will also be used at British Legion Fund raising events throughout the year as well as normal Mil Veh shows.

Thanking you all in advance.

 

Mike. :iloveyou:

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I have a CD that I could burn a copy of, lasts about an hour with made up selections of Military Radio traffic with American, English, German, Japanese & Russian versions, or I could email the files, cheers Paul

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I have a CD that I could burn a copy of, lasts about an hour with made up selections of Military Radio traffic with American, English, German, Japanese & Russian versions, or I could email the files, cheers Paul

 

would be intersted myself

 

Mark

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
Hi,

 

If you are after WW2 era stuff......This lady is very good,

 

http://www.joeri.net/radiofiles/

 

Also

 

Try g503.com, there are some free downloadable WW2 US radio traffic files on there.

 

Paul

Great Link,cheers Paul.

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I have a CD that I could burn a copy of, lasts about an hour with made up selections of Military Radio traffic with American, English, German, Japanese & Russian versions, or I could email the files, cheers Paul

 

PAUL, THANK YOU FOR YOUR KIND OFFER SIR. PLEASE LINK UP WITH ME VIA PM FACILITY & WE CAN MOVE THIS ON.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR KIND ASSISTANCE

THIS IS FERRETFIXER,..OUT............................................:cool2:

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Thanks to Joris you can now upload MP3 sound files to the forum... NO Copyright songs or soundtracks please....

 

I'll start of with this lot of WW2 chatter....

 

NICE ONE LEE, CHEERS. I HAVE SAVED THEM ON MY MEDIA PLAYER & WILL BURN LATER. USEFULL, BUT WHAT I REALLY NEED IS POSTWAR RADIO TRAFFIC. BUT THANKS FOR BOTHERING TO POST ANYWAY. :-D

 

BY THE WAY, HOW'S THE 25 PDR COMMING ALONG? :)

 

MIKE. :coffee:

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I have a CD that I could burn a copy of, lasts about an hour with made up selections of Military Radio traffic with American, English, German, Japanese & Russian versions, or I could email the files, cheers Paul

 

 

Paul, any chance of uploading them to the Forum please?

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BY THE WAY, HOW'S THE 25 PDR COMMING ALONG? :)

 

MIKE. :coffee:

 

Blog coming soon.. to busy with the Bunker Bash at the mo...:sweat:

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At the Light Dragoons Regimental Association weekend last year, my first port of call was the Command Troop complex buried under a mountain of cam nets and hessian.

Sadly, being newly-converted to Bowman this was the one place where I was not allowed to take photos.

 

I quickly became aware of "traffic" on the command net, going out through speakers. The voice procedure may have changed somewhat, but it all came flooding back.

 

Until I realised after about 5 minutes that Zero was still asking Charlie-Charlie if anyone had seen Zero Bravo, who seemed to have gone missing. Since Zero Bravo was my baby all those years ago, clearly SOME things had changed ...

 

Somehow I doubt the LD would lend you a copy of their tape.

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If you need some radio traffic for your display then just pm me with your email addy, cheers P

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heh... heard over mil radio many years back in the middle of an exercise... can't remember the call sign involved, so stuffing one in...

"Hello zero, this is Lima Two One Alpha, over"

"Zero, send, over"

"Lima Two One Alpha, fetch zero delta, over"

"Zero, unable, over"

"Lima Two One Alpha, reason, over"

"Zero, unavail-" he was interrupted by possibly the only time I've heard a massively loud snore over the radio "-DEFINITELY unavailable, over"

"Lima Two One Alpha, roger, I'll try again later, out" (sent while sender was obviously trying, and failing miserably, to hold in laughter)

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Sat relaxing one morning on Ex Summer Sales (see the Ex Crusader thread) about 1979. Slept well, ate a good breakfast, the world was well, nothing was happening at 15/19H Battlegroup HQ (as usual on Ex Summer Sales).

 

I was sat just a few feet from the penthouse on the back of Zero Alpha, the prime command vehicle, which had control.

 

Over the speakers:

 

"I'm a happy teddy bear."

 

"I'm a happy teddy bear, too."

 

"Humph. Hello unknown station this this 3 use the correct voice procedure. Out." (C Sqn FHQ's Signals Sergeant, pushing for Regimental Signal Sergeant.)

 

Over the speakers (the CO's unmistakeable voice from his Land Rover out roving):

 

"OoOOh he isn't a very happy teddy bear."

 

---ooo0ooo---

 

Late summer of 1979 and 15/19H had just taken delivery of the all-singing, all-dancing new Clansman radio systems. The 3 Armd Div FTX that year was going to feature a divisional night river crossing (of the Weser) over engineer-built bridges. 15/19H being 3 Armd Div's recce regt, the bridge was de facto to be under our control. The CO really needed to know how far he could make these Clansman sets work so that we didn't look like a bunch of James Hunts in front of the whole division cometh the day.

 

So the Regimental Signals Officer took a helicopter (he was ex-Air Squadron) and the newly-fitted-for-Clansman Land Rovers of the CO, the 2IC and OC C Squadron to do some on-the-ground trials.

 

I was to command the 2IC's Land Rover, callsign 9 Alpha. The commanders of the CO's Rover (callsign 9, pronounced Niner) and C Sqn Leader's Rover (39) were both good buddies. The three Rovers set off in convoy. 9's planned locations meant we lost him early when he went his own way, though the three of us were obviously in contact on an allocated frequency on the VRC353s.

 

I let Mick, commanding 39, lead until we too split up because he was a trained crew commander: I was just a Control Signaller. Before we split up, he had his driver pull up and the pair of us discussed a chatter net for the journey home. "Pick a frequency."

 

"How about 48MHz exactly? A nice round number: I doubt anyone else will be using it."

 

"Sounds like a plan. We'll establish comms when we have finished the trials. Rendezvous back here and we'll travel back in convoy."

 

Sorted. Now I had to map-read myself. Driver was getting tired - he was only a young lad and a little inexperienced - so I spelled him. Then I discovered he was scared of the radio, so I wore the headset and monitored our command net while I drove. Then I discovered he couldn't mapread, so I also had the map on my lap.

 

We found our location, a slipway into the Weser. We stopped and set about erecting an 8m mast and simulate the bridge commander's location. Then I discovered Smudge didn't know how to erect an 8m mast ...

 

Eventually, our task, complete, we headed back and RVed back at the agreed location. We switched to our chatter net. I have to point out that the previous year Mick, commanding 39 and I had attended the same Control Signaller Course at Bovington.

 

"Hello 39 this is 9 Alpha radio check over."

"39 okay over."

"9 Alpha okay out."

"Right let's get on with it." (That's NOT correct VP!)

 

We set off for home via a scenic route because it was a lovely hot summer day.

 

After a while, in the left ear:

 

"Hello Tango 24 this is Tango 23 over" (A tank troop leader somewhere in the ether trying to establish comms with the next troop leader.)

"Hello Tango 24 this is Tango 23 over"

"Hello Tango 24 this is Tango 23 nothing heard out"

A few minute's pause.

"Hello Tango 24 this is Tango 23 over." Clearly third troop leader really needed to speak to his mukker. I was in a good mood and a couple of years previously 24 had been my callsign after all.

"Tango 24 send over."

"Tango 23 where have you been? You MUST keep a listening watch on this net."

Teach your grandmother to suck eggs, tank boy. Bog-standard reply: "Tango 24 we have been having radio problems over."

"Tango 23 roger. Has Molar visited your location yet?" In those dim distant days, Molar was one of a long list of appointment indicators, in this case indicating someone in a QM role. (Appointment indicators held no security value: merely brevity.) I guessed the SQMS was our running a replen and 23 was waiting for him to show up with some Compo and fresh eggs and bread for a banjo.

"Tango 24 no over." I felt I was getting in a bit deep with my subterfuge but I was still cool with everything that was going on. But 23 may have been getting suspicious.

"Tango 23 send LocStat over." He wanted my location status.

"Tango 24 wait out."

Mick cut in from the leading Land Rover. "Cor how man Alien, cop the blonde coming up on the right hand side."

"Tango 23 say again your callsign over."

I watched the tyres light up on the lead Land Rover. Mick jumped out, ran to my window and leaned in. "WTF are you playing at???"

I explained what had been going on.

 

"FFS we have stumbled on somebody's command net. Gimme another frequency."

"60MHz dead. Surely we can't be unlucky again?"

 

So we returned to status quo (leaving poor Tango 23 wondering just where Tango 24 and his SQMS were). Seconds later a Lynx helicopter appeared close by. Mick decided this could be the RSO so he hung a right and he and we disappeared into a tree-lined lane at the end of which was a pub ...

 

We were late home that night.

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Thanks to Joris you can now upload MP3 sound files to the forum... NO Copyright songs or soundtracks please....

 

I'll start of with this lot of WW2 chatter....

 

Hey man cheers for sharing this quite interesting piece of recording. You havent got more of that kind by any chance do you?

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I could do a CW morse track, using the procedure we used, at about 16 - 18 WPM which was the average speed for working CW sending an encrypted message with a bit of operator correction and circuit engineering chatter on it, if anybody is interested......

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.... . .-.. .-.. --- / .- -.. .- -- --..-- / .-- .... .- - / -.. --- / -.-- --- ..- / -- . .- -. / -... -.-- / -.-. .--

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i'd reply in morse but its hard work reading it, i have to convert it to dit dahs in my head then make the association to the character!

Anyway, hello Papav66 CW = Carrier Wave, the part of the frequency used to send morse i.e USB LSB SSB and CW.

 

The comma after my name threw me for a minute couldnt remember what it was however you didnt finish the sentence with .-.-.- !!

Edited by Adam Elsdon

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Thats a really good morse tool, you can even change the time space between the letters and adjust the pitch of the morse code. The only downside is i cant see how you can create time delays between words, to make a Morse "Conversation" more realistic, mind i could just follow it and pause and continue and make a track that way using an audio recording programme!

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I could do a CW morse track, using the procedure we used, at about 16 - 18 WPM which was the average speed for working CW sending an encrypted message with a bit of operator correction and circuit engineering chatter on it, if anybody is interested......

 

Hi Adam

 

You've reminded me that I wanted to do something like this, CW, plain speach, all that :) contemporary to late '60's if I was being fussy but simply a selection of aural candy would suffice. Something to have playing on the Pinky A41 or 316 set. I did wonder whether to have something jokey as well in case I get trapped at a show by someone who knows their onions :)

 

At the very least, a long script that can be spoken as different people into a mic, saved as MP3 and given out would be nice. I might just do it this time instead of leaving it yet another year.

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-.-. .-.. . ...- . .-. / .-.. .. - - .-.. . / .--. .-. --- --. .-. .- -- / --..-- / --. .-. . .- - / .-.. .. -. -.-

 

Thanks for posting the link , just thinking who I can drive nuts with this program now ! hehehe

Edited by abn deuce

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Just had another play on the morse code site & read on the Questions page how to record the sound file. So I downloaded the 'Audacity' software, hit the record button & played morse & have now uploaded a short welcome msg on our club's homepage.

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Our barracks in Paderborn was also home to Task Force Echo HQ and Signals Troop (when the Task Force system was dropped and we reverted to Armoured Brigades, ISTR it became 33 Armd Bde HQ & Signal Sqn).

 

We didn't fraternise all that much, but I do remember a siggy telling me that the first thing they ever did after setting up was to transmit "-................................-" (or "da 32 dits dah" in his speak) which could be translated as "this is his sh!t" (with the spaces in the right place) as a means of testing the link with a simple known message of no tactical value.

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Our barracks in Paderborn was also home to Task Force Echo HQ and Signals Troop (when the Task Force system was dropped and we reverted to Armoured Brigades, ISTR it became 33 Armd Bde HQ & Signal Sqn).

 

We didn't fraternise all that much, but I do remember a siggy telling me that the first thing they ever did after setting up was to transmit "-................................-" (or "da 32 dits dah" in his speak) which could be translated as "this is his sh!t" (with the spaces in the right place) as a means of testing the link with a simple known message of no tactical value.

 

:rofl: Id forgotten all about that! we also had Circuit engineering variation on radio teletype of "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs back" which was a test of all the alphabetical characters, but generally got bastardized into "The quick brown fox savaged the lazy dog" or some such.

ZBZ5 which was used as an abreviation of I am receiving you loud and clear (on a scale of 1 to 5, 1 been poor) started getting used in allsorts of comms as "Zebedee says 5".

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