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hardyferret

moto guzzi

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Gareth Coe is the keen Guzzi man on the forum - he might have a lead or two . There were a couple for sale at W&P on one of the trade stands but I don't recall who it was .

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HF,

For that sort of money you should be able to find a Superalce - and it's a far better bike than a NF into the bargain

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Ouch !!

 

That's a lot of wonga for a 70's bike nice condition, but it's brand new really:cool2:

 

Thank's for the help, Superalce would be nice..

 

 

 

Ta HF:yay::yay:

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Once upon a time, when I was 19....

I had a job reconditioning ex army Italian bikes, Bianchi MT 61's, Guzzi Superalce, Nuovo Falcone, Airone and V7's. Most had little or no mileage on them, thanks to the fact that sometime in the early seventies the Carabinieri took over convoy escort duties from the army.

In any case, when I got a bike up and running I used to take it off for a test ride (best part of the job, no number plates, insurance, MOT etc, and no helmet either in those far off days...).

The V7 was heavy, fast and had absolutely no brakes over 90mph, although admittedly, they were the early 703cc ones with 2 leading shoe brakes.

The Airone was gutless, although it held the road surprisingly well, and had spectacular brakes (which was a waste).

The Nuovo Falcone was awful: heavy, slow, no ground clearance with incredibly soft suspension and spongy brakes. Reliability was not a strong point either (on a Guzzi!).

The Bianchi would have been an excellent bike if it had been given a proper engine, but 10,5 bhp was just pathetic, with reliability issues into the bargain. It also had the most complicated wiring loom that I've ever seen on a motorcycle.

The Superalce was, by comparison, brilliant. I bought a minter, and kept it for years. I went all over Italy with it, nearly flat out all the time, and it never broke down. The books say that it was good for just over 60, but mine would clock nearly 85 on the flat. The riding position was completely awful if you're over 5'6", the gearchange an aquired art, and the brakes definitely not up to the job, but the handling was exceptional, and it would go anywhere thanks to it's awe inspiring ground clearance. In the end I swopped it for a basket case WW2 Bianchi 500 sv (which is pretty much how it still is). If you find one, make sure it's all there, because cycle parts are a lot thinner on the ground than they used to be, but on the mechanical side there isn't a problem, unless the crank is totally knackered, which is rare. Gearbox mainshaft bearings can be difficult too, but they last for a loong time...

Good luck,

Stef

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Great details thank you the insightful story , I m sure there are others here who enjoy reading the experiances like this of all sorts of HMV's

Edited by abn deuce

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Hi Stefano

The Dutch Army also used Moto Guzzi's.

I haven't got a motorcycle license so never driven one.

Your English is excellent by the way!

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I cannot but agree 100% with Stefano, having started my service in the Italian Army at the end of the Nuovo Falcone era.

 

The Falcone wasn't that bad, with a few tricks and modifications we used it for "acrobatic figures" due to its stability, while the V7 was really monumental (see this one of the guard of honour of the Presidente, don't be fooled by the Corazzieri, they are selected among the Carabinieri and must be taller than 2 metres, this is why the bikes look small)

v7-corazzieri2big.jpg

however it's mighty heavy and when I was in the process of buying one from an ex military motorbikes dealer he let me try to raise one fallen on its side. A nearly impossilbe task for me (1.60 metres).

There are a few V50 from the Dutch army around that are modern enough to be enjoyed.

Andrea

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Andrea,

Good pic of the Corazzieri V7's there, I had one just like it for a while - never got around to getting it to go so I sold it on (shame...).

Ah, the Falcone. Now that was a completely different proposition, at least in Sport guise (Sports were usually given to the Airforce and Customs and Excise, whereas everybody else got the cooking Turismo model). Best Italian bike of the era, great handling, good brakes, spectacular forks, and amazingly reliable as long as you didn't tune it too much. Even the gearchange wasn't bad. Horrifyingly expensive nowadays, and not as fast as people think, even a really good one being hard pressed to do more than 95 without breaking something (the overhung flywheel was the limiting factor - it just doesn't like revs).

 

All the Best,

Stefano

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