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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)

BROWN OR BLACK who knows.

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)

OK Clive i am sure you will know,the only piece i can find was in windscreen,a bloke called Macstracnhoe or something,but i think he was interpreting it all wrong.cheers.

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OK Clive i am sure you will know,the only piece i can find was in windscreen,a bloke called Macstracnhoe or something,but i think he was interpreting it all wrong.cheers.

 

As far as Service Brown No.2 goes I was trying to find it myself. I thought it was in Army Water Supply but it crept in

http://www.hmvf.co.uk/pdf/BRITISHARMYFUELSUPPLY.pdf

page 14 referring to jericans.

 

I can't comment on another writer's interpretation of the Regulations but if any one wants I can post the documents that required brown to be used.

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It was that thing he did with the garden shed. Coming up with odd renewable energy uses. Heated water from a pile of black pipe in a stream. Intresting actually.

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
As far as Service Brown No.2 goes I was trying to find it myself. I thought it was in Army Water Supply but it crept in

http://www.hmvf.co.uk/pdf/BRITISHARMYFUELSUPPLY.pdf

page 14 referring to jericans.

 

I can't comment on another writer's interpretation of the Regulations but if any one wants I can post the documents that required brown to be used.

So brown is the new black,bertie will be pleased.:-D

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Dscf8274b.jpg

 

/

 

The colour of the jerrican reminds me of a similar colour used on clothing by members of the Clergy. Perhaps this is a Padre's Champ.............and the can contains holy water :)

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
The colour of the jerrican reminds me of a similar colour used on clothing by members of the Clergy. Perhaps this is a Padre's Champ.............and the can contains holy water :)

Thats ruddy brilliant just got to find a uniform now,:rofl::rofl::rofl:

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Thats ruddy brilliant just got to find a uniform now,:rofl::rofl::rofl:

 

 

Thats all we need...Pope Catweazle 1:n00b::-D

 

I blame young Farrant for this

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
Thats all we need...Pope Catweazle 1:n00b::-D

 

I blame young Farrant for this

The right reverand,:rofl::rofl::rofl:i need a peanut butter sandwich.

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Thats all we need...Pope Catweazle 1:n00b::-D

 

I blame young Farrant for this

 

Don't blame me :-D

 

:idea: We will call his Champ, the Popemobile

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:idea: We will call his Champ, the Popemobile

 

 

 

Oh yes ... I like it:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

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don,t know why but didn't his wif call him 'mr softee'

 

 

 

only in the evenings..........:whistle: :cool2:

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same sort of thing. why is bill gates called mr microsoft?

bit embarrrasing that you'ed of thuoght a clever blocke like him wood have chosed something moor manly, know what i mean mate/

 

 

:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

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Discussing jerricans in the article http://www.hmvf.co.uk/pdf/BRITISHARMYFUELSUPPLY.pdf

I stated: “Since 1965 jerricans have been supplied in black or green plastic for use with water. Prior to this specially designed metal jerricans were used that were painted black with white identification marks. It should be noted that this colour scheme was introduced in 1961 prior to this water jerricans were painted in No.2 Camouflage Brown.”

 

It been stated elsewhere that plastic jerricans for water came into service in 1966, in fact it was a year earlier as I have a black & a green one both dated 1965. That is the earliest I have found for British ones, although I have found an Australian plastic one dated 1964.

 

This is not of great consequence but more contentious is the issue concerning black jerricans for water. It is traditionally believed that post-war water jerricans should be black with some of the detail picked out in white. However studying consecutive Regulations show that this colour scheme was not always appropriate.

 

Several people have asked me to justify these sweeping statements. In the original Windscreen article I included references. But they were not on the web version. So I am happy to attach these below. The most tenacious inquisitor was our own Catweazle, who was greatly intrigued with what I had said & on the basis of the documents below decided to paint his jerrican in brown. Earlier in the year we were both at a show & saw a cheap can of military brown paint. It seemed to be an indicator that this paint needed to be on a jerrican.

 

The only vehicle I have carrying metal water jerricans came into service in 1963 & would, according to the Regulations, have been black. However Catweazle's Champ is of era when a jerrican could have been expected to be brown. With this in mind he presented his Champ with a water jerrican painted brown at Kemble.

 

I witnessed the reactions from total avoidance, to staring in disbelief & to “that’s the wrong colour mate”. Nobody was able to provide definitive evidence that it was wrong. Catweazle has posed the question on this thread but no hard evidence has emerged.

 

I have to say until Kemble I had never seen a brown water jerrican. Because most jerricans I have seen have been ones restored in black or seemingly black in a black & white photographs. But I present the documents for you to decide.

 

Regulations for the Army 1947 Pamphlet No.3 Supply of Equipment. Army Code No.1804

 

Regs19472.jpg

 

There were no amendments & the consecutive document states the same.

Equipment Regulations 1955 Pamphlet No.2 Supply of Equipment Army Code No.10835

 

Regs19552.jpg

 

There were amendments to the 1955 document in 1961 & were incorporated in to the new Regulations which now stated black was to be used.

Equipment Regulations Pamphlet No.2 (1961) Supply of Equipment Army Code No.13104

 

Regs19612.jpg

 

As these documents were consecutive I took it to mean that the change from brown to black was authorised in 1961. However it has been pointed out that this is contradicted by this.

 

Equipment Regulations Pamphlet No.9 (1959) Marking & Painting of Vehicles, Army Aircraft & Equipment. Army Code No.12473

 

Regs19592.jpg

 

However this document is not relevant to the argument. Firstly it appears to be describing jerricans for fuel, as they are to be painted Olive drab or Light stone there is no mention of water jerricans. Secondly the reference at the bottom of the page to “Paint, finishing, G.S., gloss, brushing, Black” is actually related to the left hand column which is referring to “P.O.L. tanks & pipes (iv) ladders & platforms”.

 

Given the Regulations of 1955 & 1961 perhaps we should see more brown cans? As I say my 1963 vehicle will have to comply with the Regulations & be black. I have to admire Catweazle for his investigative enthusiasm & weighing up the evidence that he asked me to provide. I suspect his jerrican will remain brown for some time or until anyone can produce documentary evidence to the contrary. He is a brave man indeed to lay himself open to unjustified ridicule & criticism.

 

So anyone else tempted to go brown? I’m not necessarily suggesting you should, but there are the documents, you decide!

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On that evidence CW is correct. Well done Clive for coming up with the goods as usual.:)

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Would the special coating on water cans be Zinc? Can't see red oxide being used on drinking water vessels.

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Would the special coating on water cans be Zinc? Can't see red oxide being used on drinking water vessels.

 

Seemed to be a creamy coloured rubberised coating but no idea of the specifications Tony.

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Be interesting to know. Had an old Stella Meta purification unit at one place. It had been painted red, supposedly one of a batch going to Africa as Fire Equipment. There was some ban on at the time on military equipment. Can't remember that having any special lining in the tank. This was 1987/88 at the time Stella Meta were still making parts for them . It had a hand pump, semi rotary I think, then a gauze bag filled with powder. Used it to water the horse in the feilds.

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
On that evidence CW is correct. Well done Clive for coming up with the goods as usual.:)

Yes well done mate thanks for all your input.:tup::

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