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6 X 6

A.E.C. Militant MK 1 Gallery

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I know there was one fitted with a crane behind the cab but not heard of one with crane at the rear, But i'll check the logistics book anyway to look.

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only reason i can think if for haveing a crane at the rear of a vheical is so that if the vheical was toweing a trailer of some sort that the crane is then able to reach the trailer without un coupling but cant think of eny reason for it to be de mountable ?

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Younggun, I was only thinking that the crane might be useful on some journeys but not others. Being able to easily and quickly remove the crane, leave it in the depot, and thereby free up valuable cargo space on a bed that is only 18' to start with could be useful. It just makes the truck a bit more flexible and productive.

 

I realize that the fact that by having the Hiab in the forward position makes the already heavy steering on the MK 1 so awkward that you almost need Cow Pie Dan at the wheel, at least while maneuvering, is something the Army wouldn't really have cared about.

Edited by 6 X 6

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I realize that the fact that by having the Hiab in the forward position makes the already heavy steering on the MK 1 so awkward that you almost need Cow Pie Dan at the wheel, at least while maneuvering, is something the Army wouldn't really have cared about.

 

You should driven the Militant Mk1 Coles bridging cranes then, 27 tons and armstrong steering :-D

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
Mike,

We once had a Mk1 come in for repairs with a Brimec slide off body, used by RE for picking up plant equipment. It was shown in one of the FVRDE / MVEE handbooks, I think that may also have been a rarity.

Hi Richard is this it?

aecbrimec0001.jpg

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Hi Richard is this it?

 

 

 

Hi Catweazle,

 

That is the one. Not sure if it was the only one, but it would have been one of the first slide backs around I would think.

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)

Hi richard its in the 1966 FVRDE book.sez prototype tilting body for royal engineers.Future production to be mounted on Mk3 chassis,dont know if any were made.So possibly the only one.

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You should driven the Militant Mk1 Coles bridging cranes then, 27 tons and armstrong steering :-D

 

Now that would be a Militant variant worth having.

 

Richard, I believe you have driven one of these, can you remember how the crane was powered ? I looked over one in Hunt's yard about 10 years ago and seem to remember some sort of electro-mechanical system to power the crane. (but I could be wrong !)

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Now that would be a Militant variant worth having.

 

Richard, I believe you have driven one of these, can you remember how the crane was powered ? I looked over one in Hunt's yard about 10 years ago and seem to remember some sort of electro-mechanical system to power the crane. (but I could be wrong !)

 

 

See: http://62.128.210.96/transport-mike/mike/militant_series/militant-series.html for a list of the projected Militant family. The slide bed may have been FV11014 and there is a good picture of the Coles crane variant.

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Now that would be a Militant variant worth having.

 

Richard, I believe you have driven one of these, can you remember how the crane was powered ? I looked over one in Hunt's yard about 10 years ago and seem to remember some sort of electro-mechanical system to power the crane. (but I could be wrong !)

 

Yes, they were diesel electric, with a Perkins 4 cyl driving a generator. There was also an electric motor connected to the transfer box so that when on lifting operations in free-on-wheels mode, the vehicle could be moved by driving the t/box with motor, and to steer, there was a large electric motor on the steering column. It took a bit of getting used to because steering control was a bit sensitive.

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Thanks to both radiomike7 for the link to a website I had been unaware of and to Richard for his explanation of the workings of the diesel/electric system. I can remember thinking, as I marveled at all the gubbings on the one I have mentioned in Hunt's yard, that it would have been a restoration far beyond my level of skill. Also, once again, because I failed to foresee forums and the internet, I didn't bother taking a photograph.

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Thanks to both radiomike7 for the link to a website I had been unaware of and to Richard for his explanation of the workings of the diesel/electric system. I can remember thinking, as I marveled at all the gubbings on the one I have mentioned in Hunt's yard, that it would have been a restoration far beyond my level of skill. Also, once again, because I failed to foresee forums and the internet, I didn't bother taking a photograph.

Then what a good thing I did!

 

0854Colescrane1.jpg

 

0854Colescrane2.jpg

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Please tell me that jib folds up for road use, it looks as clumsy as my ol man riding in to WW2 on his hoss with a lance to challenge the German tanks.

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You can't help wondering why the idea of placing a dismountable Hiab at the rear of the platform, as described by Mike, instead of the adaption we are more familiar with, where a fixed Hiab is placed immediately behind the cab, wasn't the one that went into service. Rear body mounting seems to have many advantages, and few obvious drawbacks, compared to a fixed position behind the cab.

 

If you accept that the cost of the front, or rear modification was probably much the same, one wonders why a sigificate number of MK 1's were fitted with the fixed forward position, and not a dismountable rear, Hiab. Maybe, as always happens to me, they thought of what appears to be the better design only after they had already finished building the other sort. If so, as Mike asks, what was the story behind the one in Vass's Yard.

 

We should be told.

 

 

If you can leave your crane behind you can carry a greater wight. Assuming there is unloading facilities at one end of a route, several vehicles can share a Hiab, to load, leaving behind for the next guy.

 

If the Millie Seizes or hits a mine, Chances are the Hiab can be easily salvaged.

 

On the back, One vehicle can be used more like a crane, to load and unload other vehicles.

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Mike, as always you talk a lot of good sense. The real point about these vehicles, and it's sometimes easy for us enthusiasts to forget, is they formed part of a vital logistics resource. As you will know, with logistics, military or otherwise, flexibility is really very important.

 

The only behind the cab Hiab Milly I've looked at close up had permanently lost about 2' from the length of it's cargo bed in order to accommodate the crane. If they were all converted in this way and, I suppose they were, across even a small fleet you start to lose significant carrying capacity. One truck 'lost' for every ten that had been shortened.

 

If only they had asked us first.

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Please tell me that jib folds up for road use, it looks as clumsy as my ol man riding in to WW2 on his hoss with a lance to challenge the German tanks.

 

:-D:-D

 

The crane in the photo, looks like it folds back, which is unusual, because this model was normally a 30 foot fixed length jib. The later Coles issued to RE for bridging, etc. known as a Mk.5 did definitely have a folding jib. As I used to do the repairs and SWL tests on them, I have fond memories............well, do now, probably cursed them at the time :)

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:-D:-D

 

The crane in the photo, looks like it folds back, which is unusual, because this model was normally a 30 foot fixed length jib. The later Coles issued to RE for bridging, etc. known as a Mk.5 did definitely have a folding jib. As I used to do the repairs and SWL tests on them, I have fond memories............well, do now, probably cursed them at the time :)

 

 

This one: http://62.128.210.96/transport-mike/mike/militant_series/fv11003/fv11003-intro.html has a tapered jib supposedly rated at 7tons for bridging, while the one at Hunts looks longer and may be the 6ton GS version.

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This one: http://62.128.210.96/transport-mike/mike/militant_series/fv11003/fv11003-intro.html has a tapered jib supposedly rated at 7tons for bridging,

 

The one in your link is actually rated at 7 tons free-on-wheels at min. radius of 9ft 6ins. Blocked, it will lift 10 tons at min. radius, there are outriggers and screw jacks fore and aft of the rear bogie to use this duty.

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Hold on a minute, we've bin had ! Dems two different "ones' at Hunt's yard. Which "one" are you referring to radiomike7 ?

 

0854Colescrane2.jpg

 

0854Colescrane1.jpg

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Hold on a minute, we've bin had ! Dems two different "ones' at Hunt's yard.

 

 

 

 

Or maybe the crane has been slewed 180 degrees ;-).

 

I wouldn't be at all surprised if the crane wasn't still in use when those pictures were taken.

 

Richard

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Looks like I'm wrong yet again, oh well. Yep, it's same crane with the 'photos maybe taken at different times as the scrap around

it looks changed. No doubt Mike will soon tell us.

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What I want to know is who had the tracks out from behind the cab? I was once told that was the place to look for some overall tracks to fit my Explorer as they were never used on those things and too hard to bother get out. Any truth in that chaps?

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What I want to know is who had the tracks out from behind the cab? I was once told that was the place to look for some overall tracks to fit my Explorer as they were never used on those things and too hard to bother get out. Any truth in that chaps?

 

I have never come across overall tracks on one of the cranes. That is not to say they were not issued with them.

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Looks like I'm wrong yet again, oh well. Yep, it's same crane with the 'photos maybe taken at different times as the scrap around

it looks changed. No doubt Mike will soon tell us.

 

Same one - look at the white tape at the bottom of the driver's door.

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