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Form V112G

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I expect many of us claim exemption from MOT under Regulation 30 on Form V112G (not to be confused with Form V112). Post Offices have very few of these or prefer not to look for something out of the ordinary & say go & retax it at a LVLO because they have targets for the number of customers seen per hour & I suspect this may have an effect on the earnings.

 

Well I stumbled acros this:

http://www.dvla.gov.uk/forms/pdf/V112G.pdf

 

Which makes life easier. I think the Reg 30 applies if the vehicle is used unladen, built before 1960 & over 3 tons.

 

Another interesting DLA place fo nosey parkers is:

http://www.vehiclelicence.gov.uk/EvlPortalApp/index.jsp

 

Follow "Vehicle Enquiry" then put in VRN & make of vehicle & see what comes up!

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I drove around this year in my jeep with a V112 :roll: but I am pretty sure it was illegal as there was not one thing that resembled what I had :shock: , but lots of people do it, I know 8)

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Perhaps you were mistaken for a road gritter or even a registered playbus :oops:

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I drove around this year in my jeep with a V112 :roll: but I am pretty sure it was illegal

 

Whats the point of doing that when it is so easy to MoT a jeep? If you had been asked to produce your docs, you would have found it cheaper to have had it tested.

 

The V112G is for heavy vehicles where the only test facilites are Ministry Test stations and they obviously do not wish to get them in the system there. It is all done on trust that the vehicle is kept in good order and safe.

 

Kewelde

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I know that now but at the time I was told I took on trust that it was correct, it will not hapen again, the last thing I want is a ticket and fine for not having the correct docs.

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Well I stumbled acros this:

http://www.dvla.gov.uk/forms/pdf/V112G.pdf

 

Which makes life easier. I think the Reg 30 applies if the vehicle is used unladen, built before 1960 & over 3 tons.

 

 

It is regulation 28 for all tracked vehicles.

 

The V112G system is not all positive however. I believe that it is based on a pragmatic view that with large and unusual vehicles, the owner is probably the expert as to what constitutes roadworthy status. Yes this means you 'write out your own MOT' but you are also personally responsible for all aspects of it being roadworthy. You are certainly prevented from saying 'I did not know there was a problem' as you are assumed to know and to check.

I for one am grateful that the DVLA trusts me with this and am pleased I do not have to pay up for commercial plating but would personally prefer if someone else took the reponsibility, just in case I missed something......

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You have to be very carefull of mOT exemption, there are so many things you can not do with an exempt vehicle, tow trailers, carry luggage etc, even passengers are a dark area, close scrutiny of the RTA 1988 is needed, it isn't as straight forward as it seems.

I personally know of more than one privately registered civvy truck owner who had one "stuck on him" for flounting the rules. No one wants the points or extra costs it incurs, so beware!

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Yes John, I know what you mean about some other authority verifying roadworthiness (at least at the time of examination). I have recently invested in a Taply/Ferodo Brake Efficiency Meter & that was quite illuminating driving up & down the field then braking.

 

The Pig was only half as good as the Wolf & initially the Hornet was only half as good as the Pig. But I have done some work to improve . It has also encouraged one other pig owner to go & get one of these meters.

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They were very common in 1950/ 60s for testing the braking efficiency of cars for MOTs before, rolling testing was avaivable. The are about 4 in x 6 in on a heavy metal base with two handles & on top a meter that has a scale that pivots & spins aided by an internal weight. If you shake it you can see the scale go sliding around.

 

You put it on the floor of the vehicle to be tested. Level the meter, set it to lock when it is spun. Drive down your flat track (I use a field not the road) Then get up to 20-30 mph & stop as hard as you can. The meter will spin & lock giving a % braking efficiency.

 

On the Wolf it is 70% on the Pig it is just over 25%. keep the steering wheel free during this, if the wheels pulled into to one side check the efficiency of the cylinders on the other side.

 

I believe 25% was the MOT pass line. Repeat this for the handbrake which should be about the same.

 

I looked round Beallieau auto jumble & they varied from £20 - £75. But I got mine for £23, it should come with a test certificate & a nice wooden carrying box. Even a box I saw was £12. The problem is at these sort of events you are competing with people who are collecting this sort of stuff for memrobelia/ nostalgia purposes I just want to use the thing for the purpose intended, not to keep it on the mantlepiece & polish the damn thing!

 

My Pig friend having seen mine bought a nice one at a Land Rover Newbury event for £25. So they are around. If you want to know what to look for I can take a pic tomorrow. I wish I had bought one years ago. If you do a google for them you get hits for memrobelia sales & they go for quite a lot of money sometimes even if broken so you can just to look at them.

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Thanks Clive - I think I know what you mean now... I had a LWB series 2 Safari MOT'd at a class 7 station a few years ago and they couldn't fit it on their brake testing m.c because of the 4WD 7 Free Wheel hubs so they used on of these meters.

It's memorable because the tester used the seat belts but the young indian lad in the passenger seat didn't - when the tester hit the brakes, the Landie stopped and the lad didn't but knocked himself senseless on the dash.

Landie passed the MOT OK - which was just as well as we took the lad to the local A&E!!!

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Hello,

After seeing Clive's idea about the Brake Efficiency Meter and thinking what a good idea it was, we brought one today. It's a Churchill one rather than a Taply , the only reason why we went for a Churchill is because our local MOT center uses one and I know how they work.

We got it off Ebay, there is a Taply one on there aswell. At the minute there seems to be very little interest in them so you can get them quite cheap!

 

Regards

Richard

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Carrying on the theme of MOT's, how good does the transfer box brake on a jeep have to be to pass, I have heard that they cannot test it correctly as it is not a hand brake as such but a transmission brake :?: is this correct

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Same as on a Land Rover. Thinking about it he never puts the handbrake on when its on the rollers so it doesn't get tested in action. I have to pull the handbrake on when its static and he observes the linkage move & hears it click. But thinking about it there is no verification of the handbrake actually functioning.

 

Even if I had no shoes in the transmission brake it could still pass! So perhaps the Taply brake meter isn't so primitive! I note the one on ebay is approaching the price I paid. But it is very heavy, to stop it sliding when you brake, but look at the postage!

 

One thing amazes me about people selling things on ebay why are the photos so awful? They are out of focus & poorly illuminated. In this digital day & age it is quite difficult to take a duff photo, or you can take so many shots at least one will be reasonably decent... or is it deliberate :roll:

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Same as on a Land Rover. Thinking about it he never puts the handbrake on when its on the rollers so it doesn't get tested in action. I have to pull the handbrake on when its static and he observes the linkage move & hears it click. But thinking about it there is no verification of the handbrake actually functioning.

 

Clive,

 

 

Transmission brakes should not be applied while the vehicle is moving. That is why they are not tested on the rollers. The load imposed on the transmission could shear a propshaft. The test is to apply the brake on a slope and check that it does not roll. Cannot of the top of my head, remember degree of slope, but it is not much. As the law is on Construction & Use, I think you will find that road vehicles should have two independantly controlled braking systems, thus foot and hand brake.

 

Richard

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Richard

 

We don't have a slope at my MOT place, so it doesn't seem to get tested then. Just before the GD Steam Fair I found the Hornet hand brake wouldn't hold it even a slight slope before I connected the trailer even.

 

Anyway I have verified that I have now got that up to the 25% level by charging around the field & ramming on the handbrake, but at least the Humbers has "proper brakes". As you know it also has a proper clutch mechanism, no risk of leaking fluid here, just a chain from the pedal to the clutch mechanism.

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The MOT testers manual suggests that transmission hand brakes should be tested on a rolling road, the lever to be pulled gently to avoid snatch and with ratchet mechanism released at all times until the required level is reached on the meter which then constitutes a pass. I cannot find anywhere that says it is acceptable to check the efficiency ona slope,however where it states the figures for dual and single circuit brakes

ie 16% and 25% it does say that 16% equates to a handbrake holding on a 1in6.25 slope. Hope this is of some help to you.

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Hello,

My ZIL 131 has a transmission handbrake and when I took it to an HGV test centre for it's road worthiness test, the handbrake was checked on a slope. And I mean A SLOPE, probably 1 in 3, it was STEEEEP! And I had to reverse up it! :shock:

It's a very funny feeling being 20ft up in the air ,seeing sky out the back window and concrete out the front and hoping that my 30 year old Russian handbrake would hold. Which it did,...easily! 8)

According to the tester, the brake holding on the slope is equivalent to 75% efficiently on a rolling road.

Normally, when we take our Range Rover for it's MOT the handbrake is just tested on a slight incline and the foot brakes on the road with a Churchill swingy thingy, but never on a Rolling Road.

 

Regards

Richard

 

Ps. That tapley on Ebay does seem to be going up! :?

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Hi Richard

That doesn't sound far out because if it has single line brakes it needs an efficiency of 25% which will equate to 1in4, so they are probably erring on the side of safety.

 

 

Regards

Degsy

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Hello Degsy,

I have to admit that I had my eyes closed most of the time so I wasn't totally sure of the grade! :? :wink:

 

Regards

Richard.

 

Ps. Has anyone noticed my Christmasy Avatar?

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Hi Richard

As long as they stay stil you're laughing,I've had 5 runaways in over 50 years of driving, 3 of them due to complete brake failure but this is much less common with modern braking systems. However I think that this is

a lesson for all of us that run older vehicles especially those which are not subject to an MOT.

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While we are discussing trans. brake testing on the MoT, there is an issue at present with the information given by the new MoT computer system regarding late type Land Rovers with the diff in the transfer box, ie. 90/110, Range Rover, etc. Apparantly, it tells the tester to test the trans. brake at 20 mphon a flat surface, this will do horrendous things to the drive train and when one owner saw and heard this take place he nearly lynched the tester. As LR state, that type of brake should not be used whilst the vehicle is moving.

 

I have seen a trans. brake drum explode on a Bedford MK, the results looked like a hand grenade had exploded under the axle, both tyres punctured and shrapnel straight through the timber board floor of the body and out through the canopy top. Now tell me it is safe and correct to use these brakes whilst in motion, test or otherwise. When testing comes down to it, the manual is only a guide, because different vehicles have to be assessed on their various designs, what it boils down to is common sense and experience, something the younger testers do not have. I took a customer's Bedford MW for testing last year and when it came to the brake test, the young sprog said it was too old for testing the brakes. I told him he was wrong and that he should do it. As the brakes were in top order it came out high on the scale and he was "amazed", and as I said, that is without a servo. Then as I drove off, I realised he forgot to test the horn or wipers!

 

Richard

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Agree with you 100% Richard, it's the old story 'There isn't any substitute for experience'

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It just goes to show that you have to choose your testing station wisely, or they could cause a lot of damage to your vehicle. :(

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