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AlfRim

Preserving paint

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Hello,

I have a welbike which has all the original paint still on it. It’s not really flaking off anywhere else but the carb is. Should I spray some clear paint over the carb to try and preserve it or will that react badly with the paint? Also, it might not stick resulting in more coming off. 
 

any help appreciated!

 

 

cheers
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Hi Alf i was surprised no one had answered your question but having started to write a reply realised that a simple question could in a hugely long reply ..there are so many ways in which people restore bikes from a full makeover to leaving the patina original and untouched ?....it's is that personal preference that makes it very hard to advise...

I recently read a great article on restoring classic bikes that I would refer you to ..motorcycle preservation and restoration part 2 at vintagemotortees.com

Let me comment that my restoration style is minima! ..I really love patina light and heavy and have a just in time strategy on maintenance ..however as a young man trying to run cars i came to hate rust and my rule of thumb is to kill all active dust regardless of impact to paintwork ..I use kurust and am aware that it changes the colour of paint ..

So option 1 leave it alone and enjoy the patina

Option 2 is to apply an oil or grease to

Rust proof the item and again  leave it

Option 3 is to lacquer it as is and preserve it

Option 4 is to return it to factory as  new condition

With all these options test the impact on a discrete part of the item and check you like it before proceeding

Jenkinov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I  Have a brass shell case which I am trying to preserve the stencil text would the same principles apply?

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There is a seminal book called “Restoring Museum Aircraft” written by Robert Mikesh who was the Senior aircraft curator at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. The techniques described in that book are equally valid to the preservation of vehicles.

Mikesh outlines the use of a hard wearing microcrystalline wax to protect original paintwork, to the extent that it is apparently possible once the wax is applied to apply a new coat of paint over the waxed surface and leave the original paint underneath untouched. 

 

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I have read about classic car owners using this to protect the patina on their cars. 

Ankor C Preservative Oil


Ankor C is a solvent deposited, medium term rust preventative, for use where the treated parts are exposed to outdoor conditions. This product has a very low surface tension and viscosity, and therefore spreads rapidly, penetrating into all hard to reach parts and covering all surfaces however irregular. It dries to leave a continuous protective coating of petroleum products and additives that have rust preventative properties. The coating can be built up by further applications. This product is particularly useful where metal parts to be treated are wet, because the chemistry of Ankor C has an attraction to the metal surface and this completely displaces all traces of water before laying down the protective rust preventing film.

https://morrislubricants.co.uk/internalpage

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The advice I was given by the late Graham Lay, to preserve the paint was wax, apparently he used clear floor wax on his Dingo as it was cheap and worked.

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Great to see some debate on preservation ..l

I wanted to share a strategy that has worked well ..when I got my jeep the paintwork was in a very poor state and there was exposed metal everywhere ,the upper surfaces looked ok but as soon as you looked under a wing there was surface rust . And very little paint ..I was aiming to restore the jeep for a trip to Normandy so needed to concentrate on the mechanical side of the project which I did 

I was then faced with the issue of having a jeep mechanically good but that looked as tatty as hell and I was concerned on exposing the bare metal areas to weather ...so I took a lesson from the classic steam crews and painted the jeep with 2 stroke oil and allowed it to dry for a week ..I avoided the engine bay to avoid the risk of fire and interior but everywhere else got a good coat ..the jeep was very glossy and incredibly water resistant and the oil preservation strategy worked extremely well .I must comment when we got back the jeep was subsequently blasted and repainted .I still paint spare parts with oil as a preservative and believe it's a good strategy 

Jenkinov

 

 

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On 5/24/2020 at 2:53 AM, jenkinov said:

Hi Alf i was surprised no one had answered your question but having started to write a reply realised that a simple question could in a hugely long reply ..there are so many ways in which people restore bikes from a full makeover to leaving the patina original and untouched ?....it's is that personal preference that makes it very hard to advise...

I recently read a great article on restoring classic bikes that I would refer you to ..motorcycle preservation and restoration part 2 at vintagemotortees.com

Let me comment that my restoration style is minima! ..I really love patina light and heavy and have a just in time strategy on maintenance ..however as a young man trying to run cars i came to hate rust and my rule of thumb is to kill all active dust regardless of impact to paintwork ..I use kurust and am aware that it changes the colour of paint ..

So option 1 leave it alone and enjoy the patina

Option 2 is to apply an oil or grease to

Rust proof the item and again  leave it

Option 3 is to lacquer it as is and preserve it

Option 4 is to return it to factory as  new condition

With all these options test the impact on a discrete part of the item and check you like it before proceeding

Jenkinov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello Jenkinov,

I will go have a look at the article!

I also like to leave my things as original as can be. This welbike will be staying exactly how it is. The plan is to just get her running once I find some original welbike parts like the front wheel, forks etc. I think I will leave the flaky paint how it is for now. I’m only going to be taking it to shows and doing the odd ride, other than that it will sit in my room with my other airborne items! If the paint on the carburettor starts flaking off badly, I’ll then decide but I have no need to rust proof it so it should be fine. The original paint on the rest of the bike is perfect and not flaking off gladly!

 

 Thanks for the help

 

 Alfie

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Consider Renaissance Wax. 

Renaissance Wax is the finest cleaner/polish wax available, specified by museums, art galleries and conservators throughout the world. It will gently lift the grime of antiquity and murky deposits of other polishes, leaving surfaces delightful to see and touch.

May be used on any solid surface including wood, metal (coins), marble, onyx, shell, stone, ivory, plastics or leather/paper. Its translucency allows unlimited applications and polish never stains or discolours. The hardness of the matured wax coating gives excellent protection against normal spillages, finger marks, natural acidity etc.

Renaissance Wax has a melting point of around 75-80oc making it suitable for lamp shades, chandeliers or use under spot lighting where other waxes may not be suitable.

Renaissance wax's suitability for use is expansive and is trusted as a protective layer for exhibits in museums worldwide, and has been for many years.

The special seamless aluminium container ensures wax will remain in perfect condition long after other polishes have hardened and become useless.

Available in 65, 200ml & 3 Litre containers.

https://www.preservationequipment.com/Catalogue/Cleaning-Products/Cleaning-Agents/Renaissance-Wax

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