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Richard Peskett

General Interest and War Surplus

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This is an assumption  !  - but  I would think  the  units were  manufactured by the Thresh Disinfector Company and the type/model illustrated ( it is an advertising postcard ) is the 'Silver Thimble ' model and is size no. 4. Also its looks to me to be a steam heated type of autoclave, hence mounting on the steam wagon chassis would be an ideal situation. The second image the wagon has an extension chimney  laying on the cab roof for use when stationary working.

Richard.

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Thornycroft  took an early interest in supplying the War Office , first with steam lorries and were keen entrants in various trials held pre. 1914.  Richard Hornsby  and  Daimler  also produced  these heavy tractors but order numbers were small.

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Another image  of a F.W.D. running on gas producer, all of the plants  look somewhat cumbersome. Location and type of plant unknown.  The whole subject of gas producers is very wide ranging form gas bags storing  town ( coal ) gas on roofs of civilian vehicles during  WW1 , lots of experiments in the 1920s/30s, trailer  plants mainly used with buses during WW2 , to integral plants in use in Vietnam 1989 and North Korea in 1992.84.jpg.3448081a30451396ce2876958173006e.jpg

North Korea 1992.

 

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Da Nang ,Vietnam 1989.

 

translit844.thumb.jpg.86752afc41556af484e7e57a7536c9b2.jpg Richard Peskett.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/12/2020 at 6:27 PM, Great War truck said:

Sorry Richard. What is Silver Thimble? Manufacturer or donor or something else?

Tim, the Silver Thimble was a charity that collected silver and gold oddments.  It was registered under the War Charities Act and approved by the Admiralty and the War Office.  They produced a number of postcards, one of which says that, 'since July 1915 £30,000 has been raised and has provided 9 motor ambulances; 5 motor hospital boats; disinfector £1,070 (somewhere in France); £2,000 to the Navy Employment Agency for Disabled Sailors; £2,250 to the Star and Garter Fund; £10,000 for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors; £2,000 to St. Dunstan's Hostel for the Blind; and £222 devoted to small grants.'

The Foden disinfectors used Thresh's model QQ ('Quest').

A horse-drawn disinfector exists in store at Beamish: http://beamishtransportonline.co.uk/transport-stocklist/horse-drawn/1904-patent-thresh-disinfector-ref-1970-61/

Edited by Runflat
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Thanks for explaining that Alan. It looks like it has the donors name silver thimble on a plate on the side.

 

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Could this be an ex-army truck they are dragging out of a dutch canal?

 

PLONS.JPG

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Moving aircraft - not the easiest  of things to do.  Napier  got some good publicity for their efforts but Short Bros., at Rochester had risked plenty of overhang on the 'R' series Pierce-Arrow in Royal Navy ownership. The crew of the Crossley tender look quite pleased with  themselves in Salonika, 1917. !.

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Richard P1048256053_CrossleySalonika1917.thumb.jpg.8ed6de8002bf14b24e6b9def4c025d59.jpgeskett.

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Hello to all. I am reconstructing a Citroen Kegresse from the early 1920s which was probably used by the Royal Artillery as a line laying vehicle based at Aldershot. Recently I came across a few pages photocopied from a book which refers to the tracks as a `Kegresse attachment`, but it was in a deceased friend’s folder and I don’t know from which book it might have been taken. It is possible that I have been mistakenly only looking for information about the earlier track system under Citroen rather than, Crossley,

Browsing through the comments here I just saw Wally Dugan’s post (April 24) of a manual for the Crossley Kegresse which looks like the format of the page I have. It would help my restoration a lot to see this book because my vehicle was completely disassembled, even the complex radiator had been unsoldered in to pieces. What does Wally mean when he says the book is in the box? Can I get a copy?

Cheers, Tony

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Tony, in reply to your query about Wally having the book in a box, it appears he is having major work done on his house and his collection of literature is currently in storage.

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Thanks for explaining that Ex-boy, as a newcomer I wasn’t sure if it was a reference to an archive on this site which I could look at.  I wonder if he is contactable, I’ve got a lot of scaffolding if it would swing the deal.

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Thanks Citroman, I appreciate your help and will study your friends’ site. There isn’t much around covering the early track systems and I am keen to learn about the various ways the British Army used the half track kit. I guess from your name you might like Citroens. Did you get along to the 1919 Centenaire at Ferte Vidame?

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7 hours ago, TonyB said:

Thanks for explaining that Ex-boy, as a newcomer I wasn’t sure if it was a reference to an archive on this site which I could look at.  I wonder if he is contactable, I’ve got a lot of scaffolding if it would swing the deal.

 

You could send Wally a Personal Message but I’m surprised he hasn’t seen this post: he doesn’t miss much.

Steve.

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Hi Tony, Yes i have 4 vintage citroens but helas i couldn't go to Ferte-Vidame, no days off left .

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Good idea Steve, I’ll see what works best for Wally. I don’t want to crash in to your forum community and stumble over any protocol. I’m already grateful for all the replies on the site. Shared enthusiasm sure warms up isolated days in the workshop.

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Four vintage cars is impressive Citroman. I intended to go to the ICCCR event in Poland this year to look for B2 and C4 parts, but all cancelled. Also I wanted to see where Andre discovered his famous gear system. I opened a dif the other day and found this…

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On 6/19/2020 at 11:19 AM, TonyB said:

Four vintage cars is impressive Citroman. I intended to go to the ICCCR event in Poland this year to look for B2 and C4 parts, but all cancelled. Also I wanted to see where Andre discovered his famous gear system. I opened a dif the other day and found this…

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Wow. That pinion and crown wheel are cut on a taper as well, that would be difficult with a modern gear cutting machines. It is almost like someone has set the machine shop an almost impossible task as a test. 

It is difficult to see how the correct meshing could be established due the shape of the teeth, moving the pinion forward or rearwards would not have the usual effect on backlash. Maybe with time it would mesh / wear in and it would work. I can see why the world did not adopt this design. I would imagine that it produced a very distinctive noise when running.

 

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They are a work of special engineering which I enjoy finding B series. I set it up using marking blue. I suppose Citroen used them on their small cars because they could, they had the patent and the kit. I believe their real value is transmitting power with heavy power loads, mills, pumps, and the steering gear on the Titanic I read.

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45 minutes ago, TonyB said:

They are a work of special engineering which I enjoy finding B series. I set it up using marking blue. I suppose Citroen used them on their small cars because they could, they had the patent and the kit. I believe their real value is transmitting power with heavy power loads, mills, pumps, and the steering gear on the Titanic I read.

Is the theory that with the odd shape teeth the contact area is longer within a given space and therefore can transmit greater load, or with that tooth design the pinion is not trying to wind its out of  engagement with the pinion, and in fact would be "locked" into the crown wheel by the transmitted torque by virtue of the V wedge shaped teeth?   Setting up with marking blue would the  option I would use, but it seems to me initial adjustment would not be intuitive. After a life time in automotive design and testing I also like complicated designs that push the limits. That's why I own an Alvis Stalwart😅 .  But I also like other nice engineering ,  such as the Congreve rolling ball clock, a interesting piece of engineering design but was unreliable and did not work that well, bit like a Stalwart really. 

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Yes the smaller cars had this too. Even the 5HP cloverleaf. Later it was abandoned for cars. The Citroen Engrenages (pignons) company still exsists if i am correct .

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18 hours ago, B series said:

Is the theory that with the odd shape teeth the contact area is longer within a given space and therefore can transmit greater load, or with that tooth design the pinion is not trying to wind its out of  engagement with the pinion, and in fact would be "locked" into the crown wheel by the transmitted torque by virtue of the V wedge shaped teeth?  

I see why you are interested in difs if you run a Stalwart, B series. And all those marvellous Tracta joints. But as you said in the first place, it’s the setting up to cut the chevron gears a hundred years ago which inspires respect for me. There’s lots printed about the values of that type of gear which explains both the cutting and the application better than I can. I think both your points are valid, I just scratched my head and put it back together. Probably Andre Citroen was enjoying the company of other engineers, (Salomon, Mors, Hinstin…) in a fast developing industry.

I looked up the Congreve clock, it must be great to watch. I lucky enough to do a course with Pierre Binetruy before he died, I’m sure he would have smiled and used the clock in his study of gravity.

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Citroman, I think I read they stopped fitting them to cars in 1928. But the after-market fitted standard difs so it was a joy to open this one. It had very little wear. Have you had to open the ones on any of your cars?

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