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Higginsboat

Iconic WW2 vehicle

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2 hours ago, Higginsboat said:

Is this the vehicle? WW2?

No, a mk2 holy Pig based on the Humber 1 ton truck chassis that was introduced in 1952. Probably made in the late 50s and modified for RUC use in the early 1970s.

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53 minutes ago, radiomike7 said:

No, a mk2 holy Pig based on the Humber 1 ton truck chassis that was introduced in 1952. Probably made in the late 50s and modified for RUC use in the early 1970s.

I'm sorry but I think you have been misled by the information given on http://www.tanks-encyclopedia.com/coldwar/UK/humber-pig.php

Holy Pig refers to a Mk 1 Pig with a Perspex type box enclosure, what is depicted here is a Mk 2 Pig with Makralon side protection flaps that are hinged. The 10 Pigs in service with the Reserve Force RUC from 1958 were withdrawn from service & placed into storage on 1/1/70. During their time in service they carried no RUC markings as the population was well aware of who using them.

I'm flattered that the article acknowledges some info was drawn from articles I have written & info I have provided to wiki. But unfortunately it & indeed the wiki the entry has serious amounts of misinformation. The following are typical examples of extraordinary errors: 

The operational weight of the Mk 2 Pig was not "6.5 tons"  but 7 tons 13 cwt 2 qr.

The suspension was not "independent coil springs", it was torsion bar suspension!

"...the converted FV1611 Hornet missile platform". Nonsense, the Hornet FV1620 was built on the chassis of the FV1601 unarmoured truck & not even the FV1602 FFW truck. " If you follow the link to the Hornet pages that claim is again repeated & gems like "Total production 250 in 1955-60"  actually there were only 24 operational Hornets & they were built from July 1962 to January 1963.

I had better stop there, I think I must take some smelling salts & lie down, before I collapse of apoplexy : )  

 

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To be different the LIBERTY ships would get my vote as a much over looked  part of ww2 its role made a great deal to the  out come

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10 hours ago, fv1609 said:

I'm sorry but I think you have been misled by the information given on http://www.tanks-encyclopedia.com/coldwar/UK/humber-pig.php

Holy Pig refers to a Mk 1 Pig with a Perspex type box enclosure, what is depicted here is a Mk 2 Pig with Makralon side protection flaps that are hinged. The 10 Pigs in service with the Reserve Force RUC from 1958 were withdrawn from service & placed into storage on 1/1/70. During their time in service they carried no RUC markings as the population was well aware of who using them.

I'm flattered that the article acknowledges some info was drawn from articles I have written & info I have provided to wiki. But unfortunately it & indeed the wiki the entry has serious amounts of misinformation. The following are typical examples of extraordinary errors: 

The operational weight of the Mk 2 Pig was not "6.5 tons"  but 7 tons 13 cwt 2 qr.

The suspension was not "independent coil springs", it was torsion bar suspension!

"...the converted FV1611 Hornet missile platform". Nonsense, the Hornet FV1620 was built on the chassis of the FV1601 unarmoured truck & not even the FV1602 FFW truck. " If you follow the link to the Hornet pages that claim is again repeated & gems like "Total production 250 in 1955-60"  actually there were only 24 operational Hornets & they were built from July 1962 to January 1963.

I had better stop there, I think I must take some smelling salts & lie down, before I collapse of apoplexy : )  

 

Thanks Clive, at least I got the basic vehicle right!

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Yes you were right & like you I'm not quite sure what its doing on this thread : )

It is sad when sites that set themselves up to be reference sources have duff info that can mislead people in all innocence that draw info from their site.

A few years ago, as well as the Pig wiki pages I took down a lot of stuff from the Shorland pages, which is why both look rather sparse but there is still stuff on these pages that needs attention.

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4 hours ago, wally dugan said:

To be different the LIBERTY ships would get my vote as a much over looked  part of ww2 its role made a great deal to the  out come

I like this - there's no doubt that the Liberty ships played a huge part in WW2 but also changed the way ships were built as one was launched every seven(?) days in the US. By 1943, my dad was an apprentice joiner in a Mersey shipyard and recalls some coming in to to the Mersey on their maiden voyages laden with supplies. He told me that some used to crack their hull somewhere in rough seas and, in the Mersey, they had a reinforcing repair carried out before sailing out again... This is just a tale about ships that I remember him telling. A couple of liberty ships the SS Jeremiah Johnson and the SS Jeremiah O'Brien  are preserved in the US 

 

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Because they were welded hulls the stress points were at the square corners of areas such as the hatch covers over the hold. These stress points cracked and just spread from there. Curved reinforcing plates helped spread the stress evenly over a greater area.

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If you look at a picture of the side of a Liberty ship, you can see the strengthening plate that was welded to the outside of the hull

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The record for the fastest built LIBERTY SHIP was credited to the SS  ROBERT E PEARY built in 1942 in four days fifteen hours and twenty nine minutes

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AEC    Matador  ,,     as a kid I used to watch my old mans cousin haul fresh felled timber, logged to abt. 8/10ft.  Often beech abt. 3 ft  to 4ft in dia.   Half the time the front wheels must have been 6ft off the ground and that was on rough terrain.

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There are many iconic WW2 vehicles, If you had a diorama with a Matador towing an artillery piece, a F.A.T. Morris with a limber and artillery piece, a Tilly, Humber staff car, and a jeep parked by a tent with a few chairs a couple of tables some motor bikes, an AEC 0854 Tanker with a QL Tanker, Ford and Bedford crew buses, a selection of CMP trucks with Albion and Leyland pontoon/boat carriers.edged by a Diamond T  beside a Scammel tank transporter and a recovery unit. Some iconic vehicles would still be missing. If it was the Middle East it would be a LRDG Chevrolet WB 30 being followed by a cloud of dust. Far East a Mule and Soldiers struggling through a muddy ravine. Do not forget the 150+ Fort class of ships built in Canada. One of the class was sunk in Goa by an exploding Liberty ship along with several other ships with a large loss of life.

Edited by john1950
correction addition

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Wow, that's some list for a diorama, John 1950!

And would love to see that Matador pulling logs out of the woods ruxy.

Thanks for the liberty ships Wally Dugan .

Edited by Higginsboat

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I know I'm not as knowledgeable as you guys and I've read above posts about the pigs, can someone put me right if I ask, no matter what MK it would be,  was it around in WW2...         Cheers.

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First of 20 prototype Pigs FV1609A appeared in 1956

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If we are going into shipping- The Tribal's- They must be the most beautiful vessels ever built- Is HMCS Huron still on Lake Ontario?

As a kid I remember the old AFV Black Shark being in St Aubin's Harbour for years. Also LST's in the mid to late 1960's being used to ship power station armatures onto St Aubin's beach.

For many years DUKWs were used to take tourists from the slip at Bel Royal out to Eleizabeth Castle which stands at the entrance to St Helier harbour. Whilist hobboling down memory lane- Austin K3 and Bedford MW's parked up along the harbour wall with round tubs of Jersey Royal potatoes waiting for the Mail boat. All the vehicles were painted a uniform Admiralty Grey.

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Yes Tribals were easy on the eye but Sloops did the work. Imagination is working on a picture with the potato trucks. But for an Iconic picture, T2 tanker Ohio entering Grand Harbour Malta at the end of that epic voyage.

Edited by john1950
addition

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