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3HW, pressed steel oil pump cover

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My Feb 1945 3HW (matching engine and frame) has an alloy oil pump cover, rather than the pressed steel version, just out of curiosity, when did they introduce the steel cover and when did they return to alloy, - assuming mine is not a post war replacement.?

Gareth

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I am not an expert but understand that the pressed steel was used on the military bike (3HW) and the alloy one on the civilian version (3H).

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The very early 3HW's were being supplied with the ally oil pump cover and primary chain-case. Economies soon dictated that these items would be made from steel. Certainly by 1945 they were steel. I don't think Triumph made any single cylinder models after 1945.......Until the Tiger Cub.  Ron

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Interesting!  As i have said my bike is Feb 1945 made, and has never left the UK, so its not an Indian return.  

Was there an official' civilianisation programme for unissued military bikes by Triumph to try and fill the post-war demand?  My bike when I got it was sprayed black, had full rubber furniture, and the alloy oil-pump cover.  There were no markings on the tank when I rubbed it down.  I have heard that Triumph had a buy back programme from the Goverment, so they could quickly turn complete bikes around for the civilian market, can anyone confirm this? Leyland had a buy back scheme in place at the end of WW1, which proved very successful, so it was done.

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I'm not aware that Triumph did it although Royal Enfield certainly did. However some of the big dealers like Pride and Clark and Marble Arch Motors did sell bikes in ex WD trim or fully repainted into civilian trim at extra cost. But it's more than likely that your bike was  restored by a previous owner.  Ron

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It is possible it was the local bike dealer, as their logo was on the rear number plate over the black paint, which as I said was sprayed.  I am just curios why there is an alloy oil-pump cover on a late production bike, seems like an unnecessary upgrade in some ways, also it implies they were available, if fitted post war, we will never know for certain.

 

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Presumably it still has the tin primary case. An ally oil pump cover is a dead easy upgrade/modification as thousands were produced and fitted to all the pre-war and WD singles until 41/2. It's possible that it was resprayed by your local dealer, but my money's on a previous owner. Who wanted a drab old ex army green bike until they've now become so sought after? Ron

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Is it possible that it was built from all new spares after the war ? Les at Russell Motors told me the story of how he spent about 6 years building brand new Matchless G3l's from WD spares.

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It was used by a chap who was RN working in Portsmouth, but had home bunking leave at East Cowes, so every shift he rode it from there to wet end of Ryde pier and back, then he was transferred to Gib, so the bike was only taxed and used for 9 months, its got 5006 miles on the clock,m it then stayed in his shed till the mid 80's.

 

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Sorry forgot that part of the question tin primary cover, field stand and pannier racks, all in nice black when purchased.

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My grandfather worked in a motorbike shop throughout his life .After the war there was a huge trade in ex army bikes many were civilianised the most common refurbishment with triumphs was a new paint job an pinstripping on the tank .

Prior to the war the 3s was a workers commuter bike and returned to that role . The 3HW were fast and light by standards  more popular . They appear to have been more heavily civilianised . There is evidence in those around today

that engine numbers were rebound and revamped or altered to hide the vehicles military last and increase its resale value

Jenkinov

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