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Spitfire found in Norwegian peat bog

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thanks for sharing, great story. Sad that brave young man didn't survive his imprisonment.

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His plane, Spitfire AA810, is to be restored and flown again.

not sure what part of this will " fly again" though? maybe the data tag?

_104457790_plane.jpg

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I do not think it matters how much of the aeroplane flies again. It is a link to a brave young man and will ensure he and others like him are never forgotten.

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The world of aircraft restoration is a strange one. If it was a road-going vehicle then DVLA would send out a hit-squad if you tried to register it as original.  Single vehicle type approval and appropriate modifications at the very least.

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On 11/24/2018 at 7:27 PM, 79x100 said:

The world of aircraft restoration is a strange one. If it was a road-going vehicle then DVLA would send out a hit-squad if you tried to register it as original.  Single vehicle type approval and appropriate modifications at the very least.

The  guidance from the CAA is:

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An early inspection from CAA design and airworthiness surveyors will allow us to make a decision on whether the aircraft will be an original or a replica.

There is no set minimum amount of the original aircraft required to allow the project to be considered a restoration. However, there must be something recognisable from the aircraft for it to be classed as original, normally primary structure and generally from the fuselage, even if these parts are subsequently replaced.

The aircraft's data plate will be key in establishing its original identity. Where this is no longer available evidence from historians or published material can be used and a replacement data plate made. This should include the serial number and manufacturer. We will check that a restoration has not previously been approved for the same airframe identity.

Where there is no record of the manufacturer's serial number but a military serial is known then this may be used.

In some countries a registration may be re-used on more than one airframe. This can result in an aircraft in existence where only the paperwork remains from the original and it is in fact a 'donor' aircraft. In the UK this is not accepted and genuine provenance of the actual airframe will need to be shown. However, if no other aircraft on the UK register is currently painted with the same markings then a donor aircraft does not have to be physically marked as such but it must be recorded in its paperwork.

 

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The only way that will fly again is if they fire it from a catapult...

I have little doubt that there will be a brand new Spitfire built that will bear an ID plate here & there pretending to be the actual plane (just like with P9374), but I think it's disingenuous in the extreme to suggest it's the same one.

It's good to honour the people that risked everything to fight tyranny, but the cynic in me suggests that big pound signs are more of a motivation sometimes...

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On 11/28/2018 at 12:22 PM, 11th Armoured said:

The only way that will fly again is if they fire it from a catapult...

I have little doubt that there will be a brand new Spitfire built that will bear an ID plate here & there pretending to be the actual plane (just like with P9374), but I think it's disingenuous in the extreme to suggest it's the same one.

It's good to honour the people that risked everything to fight tyranny, but the cynic in me suggests that big pound signs are more of a motivation sometimes...

 it's really quite bizarre isn't it? Why does every piece of dug-up, mangled, corroded Aluminum have to "fly again".  The CAA guide someone posted is even more weird, sounds like instructions for registering your airplane written by Monty Python crew.

 As you mentioned it's about money. they'll bust your balls to on end if your trying to register an AFV, but if you have a few million quid to buy a spitfire then apparently different rules apply. 

On a side note, there are now 3 Stuka dive bombers i nthe world, although you have to wonder how much of this one is brand new. I'm guessing , most of it

 

https://flyingheritage.org/Explore/The-Collection/Germany/Junkers-Ju-87-R-4-Stuka.aspx

    

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