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As some people may already know I have a Dodge T110L that is currently undergoing restoration, I have now decided to have a blog on the vehicle. Hopefully it will be of interest to some.

The first few pics are of the truck as found in the barn, approximately 1 year ago, a large part of the restoration has/will be carried out by Howard Wade of Rusty Bits as I do not have sufficient space or lifting equipment to carry out certain tasks, I will restore the bits that I can do.

 

 

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Well done Kevin for starting the blog :thumbsup:,

So what's the back story on the truck ? do you know anything of it's past civilian and/ or military history? what's the year of manufacture? it looks pretty complete from the photos

regards

Pete

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Hi Pete,

I didn't get a chance to put any more info up earlier so here is a bit more, the truck is totally complete with all the relevant data tags, year 1943, the body is not original and had been converted to a tipper (there was recently a similar truck on eBay). The original colour was desert sand, I don't believe it actually saw service but I don't know for sure, the theory is that it was produced in Canada and shipped over in 'knocked down' form, (when the top of the cab was removed the desert sand paint was on the 'locating legs' that fit into the lower half of the cab) I think it may have been bound for the North Africa campaign but was diverted here being as the Africa campaign ended in 1943, if anyone knows different please let me know. The truck spent most of its life on a farm being used for beet hauling, the chap that I bought it off remembers his father and grandfather using it for that purpose. The speedo shows approx 8k and the truck has been worked hard, the farmers even managed to break a half shaft! A 2 speed eaton axle is fitted as standard. Unfortunately the engine had not received much in the way of  basic maintenance and was in a sorry state. Here are a few more pictures, the truck as she emerged from the barn, loaded ready for the trip and the original engine stripped down, the heap of rust came out of the waterways, the water distribution tube had basically disintegrated and the aperture where it should have been had to be drilled out with a 24" drill bit to loosen the rust followed by turning the engine 180 degrees and banging the block onto a lump of wood to dislodge the crud!

Kevin

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Well how is warranty 😉

Nice beast though, good luck in bringing it back to life.

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Interesting comment regarding the desert colour you found.

Iv'e found a similar thing on my D15 cab under the data plates and some of the cab fittings other parts are standard G3.  I wonder if early contracts destined for North Africa and Britain were run simultaneously on the assembly line leading to a mix of paint finishes on sub assemblies prior to the application of the final top coat.

Pete     

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Pete that may well be the case, but surely it would mean extra man hours and poor productivity? However I have got a picture of a truck from the the same contract as mine which appears to have the Mickey Mouse paint scheme. I have decided to go with the desert sand colour based on it being the first colour applied.

The rear springs have been pulled apart, cleaned up and repainted complete with new center bolts and Spring shackle bushes, both springs were found to have date stamps, the springs also had an extra leaf fitted presumably fitted when the tipper conversion was carried out for additional overloading capacity! You can see that the rogue leaf doesn't have the tapered edges at each end, these pieces were left out during the reassembly, I think the ride will be sufficiently hard without them.

The chassis has been blasted, under coated and the first top coat. I am going to have a gloss coat between the undercoat and the final matt finish, this is to provide an extra layer of protection being as the matt finish paints at porous, I saw a restored Staghound in the Netherlands last year which had used the same method, the finish was excellent, hopefully we will achieve similar results.

Kevin

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I knew an old guy who went into raptures over my Dodges. He'd had one of those trucks post war. Used to tell all sorts of tales of overlaoding, and driving 36 hours at a spell. He claimed the truck bought his first house and brought up his family.

Edited by Tony B

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Posted (edited)

Hi Tony, it's always nice to hear the tales from the older generation, and you always end up learning something new.

Here are a few more details of the progress so far,  the first couple are of the chassis in its current state, Howard has blasted, under coated and glossed, it will be finished in the matt prior to assembling the rolling chassis.

The cab front scuttle vent surround had seen better days, luckily I know a very clever man that had the same problem with his Dodge WC54, he made some tooling to press out some basic blanks from which the surround could be made, it took a bit of 'fettling' to produce and I am pleased with the finished result.

Kevin

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Edited by 253cmg
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Kevin that is a very neat job on the vent,  is there any chance of some photos of the press tooling you used as mine has gone in exactly the same place as yours so I will have to do an identical repair.

Pete

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Hi Pete, I will see what I can do, I will be seeing the chap concerned this coming week.

Kevin

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The following pictures show the engine being stripped down prior to the machine work and rebuild, I decided to carry out the rebuild myself to save on costs plus have a greater degree of control over the process, hopefully it will prove the correct decision!

I bought an engine stand off the Internet and selected a greater design weight than required, however it became very clear that the stand would not support the weight of the block, rather than send the stand back I elected to make it 'fit for purpose' based on the assumption that the majority of these products are imported from the same place. As can be seen the engine now sits in a rotisserie, to withdraw the camshaft the block was temporarily supported at the far end. As each part was removed it was cleaned, inspected and laid out on a bench. Various photos were taken to aid reassembly in an attempt to reduce head scratching during reassembly!

Kevin

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