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Etching Paint

Question

I have read a lot both here and elsewhere regarding Etching Paint.

If I have read correctly its to be used on bare metal, not metal already painted, is this correct?

Assuming Correct I assume I need to clean all paint, not clean rust areas then etch?

Can any one advise a good supplier for the novice

Thanks

Richard

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If you are painting that Land Rover, then for an authentic finish, wet down vehicle thoroughly, drive for 5 miles down a dusty track, then apply Nato green from a 20 litre can using a worn out yard brush.  As lumps fall off later, remedy with the special touch-up kit (1 litre can of Nato green and ball of cotton waste).  Repeat every year until weight limit is reached then sell to someone who likes spending three months removing paint layers.😁

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Tecnically you'll only need etching primer for non ferrous surfaces. You can spot prime areas without removing large amounts of paint, then when topcoating do the primed area then a slight blow over the surrounding paint to match. For steel a good zinc rich primer is usually used.

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Many thanks, just trying to get my head around this as never done before but considering it for repairs tec

Richard

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Etching primer is brilliant, it will even etch into plastic as it marked my microwave. I use it for most things now, I found the spray (CAN) etch isn't that good though.

Diana

Edited by Diana and Jackie

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The acid burns in to get GRIP,  often these primers are water based.

There are chemical 'pre-treatment' for difficult metals such as aluminium and stainless steels, used at wash stage prior to dry-powder or wet stove enamel. Then you just use the finish coat , so similar acid chemical(s) within a primer.

You may read about 'shop-primers' on new body panels , just a anti-corrosion primer for storage as spares - you may come across these on very cheap aftermarket body panels, up to you to strip and re-prime.  Better aftermarket panels have quite a good primer - same as OEM - that you can't better.  Land Rover 'Birmabright' panels (genuine) have had a good primer that you just de-nib & clean since late '70's.   I understand most are alonized (not anodised) in any case prior and you don't wish to damage that.

Aluminium grades - without use of acid etch ,  You just well rough with a course production paper (not under P220)  and apply primer (I always used a cellulose basic).

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Upoxy  SUPER ETCH  , is just that  !  the best of all..

Upoxy Research Ltd , nr Edinburgh have been around many years for good reason(s).   The trade use it for wings , plastic bumpers etc.

Edited by ruxy
spelling

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22 hours ago, ruxy said:

The acid burns in to get GRIP,  often these primers are water based.

There are chemical 'pre-treatment' for difficult metals such as aluminium and stainless steels, used at wash stage prior to dry-powder or wet stove enamel. Then you just use the finish coat , so similar acid chemical(s) within a primer.

You may read about 'shop-primers' on new body panels , just a anti-corrosion primer for storage as spares - you may come across these on very cheap aftermarket body panels, up to you to strip and re-prime.  Better aftermarket panels have quite a good primer - same as OEM - that you can't better.  Land Rover 'Birmabright' panels (genuine) have had a good primer that you just de-nib & clean since late '70's.   I understand most are alonized (not anodised) in any case prior and you don't wish to damage that.

Aluminium grades - without use of acid etch ,  You just well rough with a course production paper (not under P220)  and apply primer (I always used a cellulose basic).

---------------------------------------

Upoxy  SUPER ETCH  , is just that  !  the best of all..

Upoxy Research Ltd , nr Edinburgh have been around many years for good reason(s).   The trade use it for wings , plastic bumpers etc.

Thanks, not far from Edinburgh

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Super ETCH =  2 pack.    I now try and avoid all 2 pack ,  I use a good breathing mask & always spray outside in open-air.   I find the spray-gun hose enough to cope with  (esp. if using a gravity gun) , may sometime go for a belt/filter unit.

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The acrylic single pack primers ,acid etch(s)  - I have used have stayed fluid in the cans for ever.  Handy to have for small area repairs.

The alkyd primers , acid etch(s) - I have used , part used cans have gelled but that was leaving them abt. 1 year.

 

 

 

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I was told Upoxy Super Etch is 2 part not 2 pack, because it is isocyanate and chromate free.

I stand to be corrected.

Richard

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45 minutes ago, Scammell4199 said:

I was told Upoxy Super Etch is 2 part not 2 pack, because it is isocyanate and chromate free.

I stand to be corrected.

Richard

Yes , you are correct , the bottle liquid may in fact just be the acid ? or a activator.   I have used it because it is far safer than a real 2K

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Reading the response I need to do some more research before attempting anything. I am looking at small scale maybe 1m at a time. And occasionally, so wonder on shelf life of these products

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https://www.orionpaints.co.uk/product/international-special-metal-primer-white-750-ml/

 

I keep a tin of this by International for small jobs , stays OK in the can for years and years. White is a good colour for a primer although out of choice I would not normally go for it.

Another leading manufacturer (no names no pack-drill) also has a paint called 'Special Metals Primer' , also water based and is a red-oxide shade - however it does not have a long storage life after the tin has been opened in my experience.

Edited by ruxy
spelin

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I've used this stuff quite a bit and I used it on my Jeep with good results. I've had a tin on the shelf for several years went to use it a couple of weeks ago and all fine.

I have recently re-skinned the Scammells cab using galv sheet and I'm considering using either the Upoxy Super Etch or Acid#8 if anyone has any useful comments on that plan.

Thanks, Richard

 

paint.jpg

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On ‎9‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 6:43 PM, Surveyor said:

Reading the response I need to do some more research before attempting anything. I am looking at small scale maybe 1m at a time. And occasionally, so wonder on shelf life of these products

They have the Upol Aicd#8 stuff as an aerosol in Halfords. Good for small bits and to do a test.

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1 hour ago, Scammell4199 said:

They have the Upol Aicd#8 stuff as an aerosol in Halfords. Good for small bits and to do a test.

Yes thanks for the reminder, will see if I can get some from scrap to try first

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A  'single-pack'  will always have limitations, a "two-pack" (loose activator / acid) will always have more GRIP , and this is what is needed - obviously starts at commercial sized cans for spraying. Upol have some good stuff  - so their rattle-cans may have what is needed.   The modern (I have a small sample can - unopened , now 41 years old, it was in fact license Corroless by manuf. by Finnegans)  glass-flake technology with acid in theory should give best anti-corrosion, a few are around - mainly for steel. However I don't think they are anywhere near as good as Upoxy Super Etch.

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Thanks for the answers, I read about the paint in the LRO Magazine and thought would ask

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