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Oldest Bedford OY

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Not sure you understood my previous post as intended which was not a criticism, yes vehicle of this age would most likely go through a rebuild program as denoted unusually on the rebuild plate riveted to the frame.  My view is it’s up to the owner how they portray their vehicle, what if any genuine service history it may have is explained. Most importantly I think is the owner happy with their vehicle and its historical representation.

While I have as yet not owned an OY I have for some time looked after a few owned several QL’s a Dingo an Austin K-6 K-9 and K-3 a Scammell SV/S and numerous others. I have been doing this a long-time and on occasions been asked to judge comment and write leaving others to make their own minds up. As for a vehicle being 70, 80-years old and not undergone some form of restorative work is unlikely. As for the OY in the photo above from what I can see it looks good and one I’d make a point of taking a photo of should I come across it at a show, by the way I found a box of two new old stock sling plates.

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Hi Baz,

It was not meant as a criticism of your post, but an additional observation. I have also been working on and looking after military vehicles as full time occupations for the last 45 years so do know my way around British vehicles predominantly as they are my main interest., doing repairs, overhauls and restorations. In fact the actual Bedford in the photo I have worked on.

The overhaul plates on the chassis are mostly post-1949-50 when the registrations took over from census numbers. The dates on these plates of overhaul or rebuild are mostly in the Fifties. Prior to that there were smaller rebuild plates denoting rebuilds in the Forties that were placed in the cab, I recall one on a MW that I restored. I would think these were often removed on a subsequent rebuild, so these vehicles may well have had two or more rebuilds in their service life that current owners would not be aware of. A long part of my working life was in a REME workshop and I am well aware of what went on as at the time I started there were still the odd WW2 vehicles coming in.

All fascinating stuff and always interested to read what comes up on here.

cheers Richard

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4 hours ago, Baz48 said:

The one above may be on singles and it may be 1940 production while its engine side panels are post 42 singles all round I understand came in end of 40 early 41 for OY's while OW's kept 32x6 single fronts 34x7 twin rear's 

I do however have the correct one on the other side, she also has a heavily modified gs body done by the Dutch fire brigade in 1951. 😀

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That's great reff the side covers and that's how I would keep it if I was lucky enough to own it. The rear body how was it modified purely out of interest 

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Hi I didn’t take it as criticism and nether was my post a criticism of the OY but an observation of its service mods.  Like you my interest is British and I include Commonwealth as amongst others I help rebuild and look after is a CMP C-15A which still has its 40’s mod plate riveted onto the back of the engine cover in the cab. I am always open to persuasion and happy to learn something new and have been since first working to install equipment into military vehicles as an apprentice in the early sixties and been working on restoring conserving ex-military vehicles ever since. Its great you get to know nice people.   

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1 minute ago, Baz48 said:

Its great you get to know nice people.   

Baz, you are right there, I have friends across the world due to our shared interests in MV's. 👍

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14 minutes ago, john1950 said:

A question, What is on the trailer? 2nd photo last batch.

Its a aircraft detecting device . Acoustic location devices were used by military services from mid-World War I to the early years of World War II for the passive detection of approaching enemy aircraft by listening for the noise of their engines. 

Here is a link

https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/01/27/vintage-sound-locators/

 

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