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Deathwing

FV432 driving on street query

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Posted (edited)

I passed my category H some years back, and am presently thinking about buying a small piece of land near where I live to build a garage on to house an FV432. However, access to the land is over the pavement and I am very wary about the potential to cause damage to the paving/roads. You can see the pavement in the attached image.

Does anyone with experience of driving FV432s know if (with proper pads fitted and driving at the 20mph limit) they are likely to cause any damage to the roads, and furthermore whether they are likely to wreck that pavement if they mount it to access the garage? I am thinking about asking the council for a dropped kerb (perhaps without mentioning I intend to put a tank there!)

Merlin

1.jpeg

Edited by Deathwing
Added image of pavement

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crossing a tarmac path without turning should be ok, but.........

not advised in this heat as tarmac will be too soft

DO NOT turn, as it will lift the tarmac.

with my council, it is illegal to cross a pathway to gain access, unless an authorised  dropped kerb has been constructed (here they have to be concrete) oh, and you have to pay for it!

There was an instance some years back, where a chap damaged a tarmac path by driving a 432 across it at 45 degrees-got sued for £6700 plus costs...........

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I think a dropped kerb is a requirement everywhere and certainly sensible in this situation. Could save problems in the future, as you will have done it legally.

Good luck with the project.

Steve.

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Thanks - I'll try and persuade the council that a dropped kerb will be necessary to park my tank (and that I've made the request while sober!)

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You will needs roads consent assuming the road and footpath have been adopted also you may need planning.

For the crossing you may have to employ an approved contractor 

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You may also have fun getting planning permission for the garage ...

Andy

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On ‎7‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 10:30 PM, andym said:

You may also have fun getting planning permission for the garage ...

Andy

Yes, you might have been better mentioning Tracked vehicle access. Rather than 'Tank'!......

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Strange my son calls my Land Rover a tank, think I could confuse the planners, wonder what he would say if I did bring home a tracked tank?

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I’ve come into this topic a bit late, but here’s my thoughts as a person who used to agree to dropped kerb applications for a local authority....

Be honest up front, a track-laying vehicle is fine provided it is road legal. If the jobs done correctly the neighbours can’t complain!

Planning application normally only required if you are on a classified road.

It’s not just a dropped kerb you get for your money, it’s also extra protection to the numerous utilities that lie just below the footway.

You will definitely need the highway authority, or it’s approved contractor to carry out the work, due to public liability insurance reasons ( usually a figure of £5m) . This won’t be cheap and at the end of the day you won’t end up "owning" the section of altered footway, it’s still the highway authority's.

One advantage of doing the job correctly is that the dropped kerb "protects" your right of access to your land and any vehicle parking across it is causing a legal obstruction.

Good Luck.....

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Personally I would get the kerb dropped and apply for a garage I am no expert but why would you mention the vehicle type?

I feel it may give some one more to object to, but its just a vehicle and as long as the estate has no covenants on vehicle type / weights I dont see a problem, often the said covenants are never enforced as no one wants to pay the legal costs.

Until recently we had a local bloke with the biggest Zil I have seen in the garden

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15 hours ago, Stanley01 said:

 

You will definitely need the highway authority, or it’s approved contractor to carry out the work, due to public liability insurance reasons ( usually a figure of £5m) . This won’t be cheap and at the end of the day you won’t end up "owning" the section of altered footway, it’s still the highway authority's.

 

Admittedly this was 18 years ago but when I dropped the kerb (and lowered the footway) for access to my drive, the local authority allowed me to carry out the work myself; the only work carried out by an outside contractor was the final surfacing. All that was involved was a site visit from a man from the highways department, who listened as I explained what I proposed to do, expressed surprise that I wanted to do it myself, gave me a specification to follow and told me to go ahead. I'm pretty sure that nobody ever even came back to check that it had been done properly.

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That was true, but now you need a ticket to dig and reinstate, it is supposedly to prevent holes in the highway having to be dug up several times to sort

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14 hours ago, Surveyor said:

That was true, but now you need a ticket to dig and reinstate, it is supposedly to prevent holes in the highway having to be dug up several times to sort

Anyone digging on a street or highway under the Roads and Streetworks Act 1991 has to have a licence.  In a nutshell this was introduced by the Government in order to prevent a road or pavement being incorrectly re-instated, thus causing subsidence or potholes. It was also to prevent a road or pavement being dug up, reinstated and dug up a few months later by a different utility to the first.

The fact of the matter is the dodgy practices of the past still continue with some contractors totally ignoring the legislation - especially some councils own staff !!!!

Diana

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15 hours ago, Diana and Jackie said:

The fact of the matter is the dodgy practices of the past still continue with some contractors totally ignoring the legislation - especially some councils own staff !!!!

Well there's a surprise!!! NOT

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