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HotBed

Coker 10.50x16 track grip tyres

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Posted (edited)

Hi all, 

has anybody brought any of these tyres from Northants tyres, and fitted them to British rims, I’ve been told that the chamfer on the British rim is 3 degrees and the American made tyre is 1.5 degrees, does the British rim need to be machined or maybe take a sanding disc to the tyre, they are quite a lot to buy so I really need to get it right.

TIA

737A7A97-DED3-4563-80FB-E463453BC604.png

Edited by HotBed

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Those look nice, very much like one of the WW2 patterns. I think that the bead as shown in the photo is narrow enough that it won't matter what angle it is at but the diameter will be critical. There is a debate about this in the recent ongoing thread about Trak-grip tyre  re-manufacturing.

David

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Thanks Richard, I was reading the wrong thread on the MLU 😃

righto,  decision made I’m ordering 5 😬

 

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Posted (edited)

are these 10.50 x 16? if so how much are they and are they rated for road use? Radial or crossply?

Thanks

 

 

Edited by jim fl4

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20 minutes ago, jim fl4 said:

are these 10.50 x 16? if so how much are they and are they rated for road use? Radial or crossply?

Thanks

 

 

Yes they are 10.50x16, 8 ply rating and I think they are crossply, look on the Coker website for more info, I’ve been quoted £280 each.

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Posted (edited)

I needed to fettle the rim with a 5 inch grinder to the inner edges of both half’s, to get the rough pitting off and just slightly chamfer it

I also took a Stanley knife to the outer edge of the bead of the tyre, just a small amount as there is woven fabric not far underneath, then it slipped on nicely.

The middle picture is of my 1100x16 Michelin XL for a comparison, these Coker tyres are a lot taller than the Mitas equivalent.

Edited by HotBed

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Are these tyres road legal? speaking to a gentleman in Canada who informs me that if they are the one manufactured in the USA they are not DOT approved and therefore not road legal. Is this the case for the UK?

 

Jon

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1 hour ago, johann morris said:

Are these tyres road legal? speaking to a gentleman in Canada who informs me that if they are the one manufactured in the USA they are not DOT approved and therefore not road legal. Is this the case for the UK?

 

Jon

Jon,

As I understand it, tyres made for vintage vehicles (I seem to recollect before 1949)  do not need the European rating ........ or DOT it seems, as I have just found this on a UK Classic tyre supplier's website,( I underlined relevant phrases):


The Blockley Tyre Company’s objective is to produce the highest quality tyres with authentic appearance and handling characteristics for Vintage, Veteran and Classic cars to use on both the road and track.

Tyres manufactured for older cars are exempt from the legislation expected of tyres for more modern vehicles but despite this Blockley have chosen to attain:

  • Speed rating from S (113mph) to W (168mph); see individual tyre entries in our Shop for details
  • US Department of Transportation (DoT) coding for the manufacturing processes
  • European standard 'E' marking for all 15", 16" and the 600/650 x 18 crossply tyres and all the radial tyres in the range

The reason for voluntarily adopting these measures is to ensure Blockley Tyres maintain the highest standards of quality and performance. As far as we are aware Blockley Tyres are the only range designed for historic vehicles on the US market which are DoT marked.

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Posted (edited)

 

Thanks for clarifying this Richard

Edited by HotBed

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Probably a silly question but is the tread pattern on your fitted Coker tyre facing the wrong way? 

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IF l remember correctly when fitted to non driven axle the method shown is correct as there is no advantage to fitting the same as to a driven axle and it would wear less

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MatchFuzee said:
Probably a silly question but is the tread pattern on your fitted Coker tyre facing the wrong way? 

No, on British vehicles the tread is backwards to help braking and wear, the old wheel driven muck spreaders had their tyres on backwards to what the tractors were, this gave the spreader extra grip, so if you brake hard on soft ground you will have better braking, also if your lorry is 4WD you’ll have more traction in reverse when you are stuck.

But there maybe some other military reason as to why their on backwards !.

Edited by HotBed

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The original intention was point first as that way, the tread self cleans of mud better. However, they wear much less if fitted open end first and it was argued that if you looked like getting stuck, you would tend to reverse out and find a better route so self cleaning in reverse would be more useful! There was some period discussion on the net in the last few days, can't remember where.

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I can only find a few images of vehicles fitted with Michelin XLs tyres (non of Coker) and they are all point forward.

From the Coker site:-

Military Directional Tread | 1050-16

High-quality tires for your refurbished jeeps and older military vehicles as well as general purpose tires for cranes, shovels and dump trucks. The directional tread design on these high-quality tires provides equal traction in either direction.

So no need for point backwards for reversing if stuck but I hadn't heard about less tyre wear when fitted point backwards.

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I always understood that it should be open end first - like an animal's hoof moving on ground - so as to give maximum traction.  But as has been said, some tyres have rotational symmetry.

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Michelin XLs are radial and are now made of unobtainium. 😃

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23 hours ago, Runflat said:

I always understood that it should be open end first - like an animal's hoof moving on ground - so as to give maximum traction.  But as has been said, some tyres have rotational symmetry.

If it were a tractor tyre (similar directional tread pattern) then it would be pointed end of chevron touching the ground first. But I think it was found that the tyres wore quicker this way and thus instructions to reverse the tyres. Bearing in mind the rubber situation during the war, anything to make the tyres last longer.

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On ‎8‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 11:56 AM, MatchFuzee said:

Probably a silly question but is the tread pattern on your fitted Coker tyre facing the wrong way? 

I was correct, it was a silly question but nice to see the fitting instruction in black and white.

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No question is silly if you don’t know the answer. 😃

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13 minutes ago, HotBed said:

No question is silly if you don’t know the answer.

Thank you.

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